jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (12 posts)

What is the Vineyard Principle and how does it pertain to the cruelty of man?

  1. mintinfo profile image74
    mintinfoposted 5 years ago

    What is the Vineyard Principle and how does it pertain to the cruelty of man?

    Fruits spoiling on the vine......perhaps?

  2. Juliet Christie profile image80
    Juliet Christieposted 5 years ago

    The vineyard principle is  growing and nurturing fruits  such as grape till it reaches maturity. Not done correctly will results in grapes that are rubbery and not succulent. Using this principle can apply to humans when rearing them as children.

    The mind of men need to be properly trained in order to be of benefit to himself and society. People live what they learn. Not  correctly nurturing  the young  child's mind and not handling it with care  and love can result in the transference of this harsh treatment.
    This may manifest itself to others and  may sometimes even to  extreme  cases  seen as cruelty .

    1. loveofnight profile image80
      loveofnightposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I have never heard of this expression before but you have explained it beautifully.Thanks

  3. MickS profile image72
    MickSposted 5 years ago

    I don't know, but perhaps it refers to Steinback's, Grapes of Wrath (is that right, Steinback?)  When the vinyard owner took the rate of pay to a level for which no one would work, then raiserd it by a cent so they would, that could be considered as cruel, especially to casual workers.

  4. Chuck Bluestein profile image64
    Chuck Bluesteinposted 5 years ago

    It teaches that when people cannot eat grapes, they say that the grapes are sour. Just a guess. Have no clue. How come people who have no idea about something speak about it?

    1. MickS profile image72
      MickSposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Because we are all intelligent and have thoughts on the matter.

  5. SidKemp profile image95
    SidKempposted 5 years ago

    I see two ways of looking at this. One is that a Google search turned up only one reference to the Vineyard Principle, and it was in business marketing. It is, as Juliet Christie says, about nourishing all the grapes on the vine, not only the ones that ripen first. The idea in marketing is to build relationships with customers who don't buy immediately. The grape is the customer, and you want to nourish them until they are ripe to buy.

    But the metaphor of the vineyard goes much deeper than that, back to the Bible, and it is connected to developing human goodness and leaving cruelty behind. It is "As you sow, so shall you reap." This teaches the lessons of the farmer (or grape-grower) with regard to all of life. We must plant good seeds. We must be patient. We must weed daily, water well, and keep pests away. And, once the harvest begins, we must wait for ripeness, but then pick quickly, before the fruit rots on the vine, and before it is eaten by animals or bugs. Lots of attentive care of our good crop is essential to produce goodness - in ourselves, in our children, and in all life around us.

    Focusing on the vineyard, in particular, one might add two things. A grape vine can be cut all the way back to a bare stem, and still regrow. Just so, a person who loses everything, like Job, can return to prosperity if he remains faithful. And, at the end of the process, at the time of harvest, especial care must be taken. The vine is full of riches that many will want to steal, and also will rot quickly.

    Let us learn to nourish goodness all the way through life, to be patient, and to take especial care in the harvest.

    Only then will human cruelty and indifference pass away. And then "each man shall live beneath his vine and fig tree, alone and unafraid" as the old song, based on Isaiah, says.

    My hubs on Stephen Covey's 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, and my hubs on Zen all talk about this. In the East, it is called the Law of Karma.

    1. msorensson profile image72
      msorenssonposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      "each man shall live beneath his vine and fig tree, alone and unafraid" as the old song, based on Isaiah, says....
      Indeed..

    2. loveofnight profile image80
      loveofnightposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      "Let us learn to nourish goodness all the way through life" I like that, a good share indeed.

  6. starsofeight profile image60
    starsofeightposted 5 years ago

    This is not really an answer to your query -- I merely wish to offer an insight that you might find interesting in regard to your topic.

    In the Bible, mankind is often portrayed as a commodity. He is not only the grape that will ultimately be squeezed into wine, he is also the wheat that will be gathered into the barn. Again, he is the fruit tree that must be pruned to produce more, or be shaken so that all the fruit that will fall does fall. Also, man has been referenced as the sheep that is regularly sheared.

    In all, it appears that mankind is a tasty or useful product. We are tended or cared for only to collect and consume what develops in us. We are God's sustenance. Finally, if we are the field that is harvested, what does that say of those deliberately left behind for the gleaners?

  7. mintinfo profile image74
    mintinfoposted 5 years ago

    Thanks for your answers so far but further insights may be found if you substitute Principle with Parable.

    1. SidKemp profile image95
      SidKempposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Ah, Yes! The parable of the vineyards (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parable_of … e_Vineyard) is a different story. It is not about cruelty, but about God's grace awarding Heaven to all, whenever we are willing to start work for Him.

 
working