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Are teens being pressured into playing sports ?

  1. Wonder Referrals profile image38
    Wonder Referralsposted 6 years ago

    Are teens being pressured into playing sports ?

    Parents,teachers and coaches are they part of the problem?

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  2. Nettips profile image60
    Nettipsposted 6 years ago

    Probably for two reasons:

    1) Sports help teens stay active and avoid the adverse health affects of a sedentary lifestyle

    2) Becoming a successful athlete can lead to a life of lots of money and a free ride to college.

  3. mcrawford76 profile image81
    mcrawford76posted 6 years ago

    Yes. I speak from personal experience that not only was I forced to play sports (by my father) that I was severely punished when he found out that I had joined the tennis team because it was not a "manly" sport.

    Though in hindsight I do not regret playing football and recall fondly all the time I spent with my teammates and the privileges and status that it allowed me in high school. But at the same time I do feel that it was a choice that was not up to me.

  4. kestrana profile image77
    kestranaposted 6 years ago

    I think for some families and communities there is a huge amount of pressure to play sports, especially baseball, football and basketball for boys. This is partly because there a huge popularity boost for successful athletes in our communities especially at the high school level in suburban and rural areas. Others have a "family heritage" to uphold. Finally, in many impoverished communities, being a professional athlete is seen as their ticket out of the ghetto - and sometimes seems like the only viable option.

    In the Dominican Republic there are baseball "farms", training camps for children as young as 8 that are sponsored by professional baseball. These camps do a lot of good work educating kids as well as teaching them about baseball but because they're so competitive to get into, outside of the schools bad things happen to slant kids' odds of getting in.

 
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