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jump to last post 1-3 of 3 discussions (9 posts)

What is the best way to determine the value of a baseball card?

  1. Faith Reaper profile image85
    Faith Reaperposted 3 years ago

    What is the best way to determine the value of a baseball card?

    My dad was a huge baseball fan, and I am just wondering how to find out how valuable baseball cards are today.

    Thank you for answering.

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/9151688_f260.jpg

  2. tsmog profile image81
    tsmogposted 3 years ago

    Baseball cards are graded. It is a finicky business. Things like sharp corners count and no mars on either face of the card. The best way to get an idea of a card's value is go to Beckett.com. There you will see guides for grading. There are grading services too. If there is a hobby store where the owner is into that then you may get some advice if you purchase something for the favor. However all collectors are looking for a great bargain or deal . . . caution to the wind smile

    1. Faith Reaper profile image85
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi tsmog, thank you so much for your wonderful insight into determing the value of a card! Yes, I thought that to be the case about all collectors looking for a great bargain and I appreciate the headsup. Thank you for the site too. You are a great.

    2. tameka carodine profile image61
      tameka carodineposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Take the base baseball card to a dealer and see how much you can get for it.A collecter of cards can tell you if it is valuable item.

    3. Faith Reaper profile image85
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you so much again, tsmog. I appreciate your help.

    4. tsmog profile image81
      tsmogposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hello. I sold and traded cards for about 5 years. You can research cards at eBay for the going values and Becket too. There are gatherings for sports memorabilia too. Sometimes cards have more value by complete sets too.

    5. Faith Reaper profile image85
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      @ Tameka, thank you for answering.
      @ Hi tsmog, Oh, that is great to know and thank you for sharing that info. My dad was a huge Red Sox fan, well, he loved ALL sports, especially baseball.  You are so kind to return to share more of your knowledge.

  3. Frank Atanacio profile image83
    Frank Atanacioposted 3 years ago

    I found this for you Faith:

    Some say that baseball cards had their heyday in the 1950s and 1960s, but there are still many people who acquire, trade, buy, and sell baseball cards on a regular basis. For these collectors, it is essential to know the values of their collections, yet values can change over time. For this reason, collectors must keep in mind several key factors that will help them to evaluate their baseball cards, even if values evolve. Things to take into consideration include a baseball card’s book value, market value, condition, scarcity, and personal value. By examining all of these elements, collectors can estimate the worth of their baseball cards in order to trade, sell, or simply cherish them.
    Book Value Versus Market Value of Baseball Cards

    In order to determine the value of baseball cards, collectors must first understand the difference between book value and market value. Book values are regularly published in price guides by sports specialists like Beckett and Tuff Stuff. By looking up a card by date, brand, player, and card number, a collector can find the book value of any card listed in these price guides. A price guide lists the low price and the high price of the card, representing the lowest and highest values that can be expected for the card. At one time, these price guides were the primary sources of information for collectors who wanted to know the value of their baseball cards; however, collectors now know that cards are often bought and sold at prices that greatly differ from their book values. The prices at which cards are actually bought and sold represent the market value.Thanks to the creation of online marketplaces, such as eBay, baseball card collectors now have constant access to real-time data on the market values of baseball cards. Even if a card has a book value of $100, it could still be sold on an online for $150 if a buyer is willing to pay that much. These transactions are on record for all to see, allowing collectors to identify the cases in which book values and market values differ. Market prices can easily be found by searching for baseball card auctions on eBay or by visiting forums for baseball card collectors. For this reason, when determining the value of their cards, collectors should research current book values as well as market values in order to have a full understanding of their cards’ worth.

    1. Faith Reaper profile image85
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Wow, you are certainly one in the know on this topic, dear Frank! Thank you so much for the awesome answer and taking time to inform me of such with your great knowledge here. You should write a hub on this topic. You are awesome, and I appreciate yo

 
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