Wy do womens shirts button left?

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  1. qwark profile image54
    qwarkposted 7 years ago

    Who thought of this and why?
    Is there a purpose for it?
    What might the purpose be?

  2. Reality Bytes profile image79
    Reality Bytesposted 7 years ago

    Seperating the clothes after laundry?

  3. relache profile image86
    relacheposted 7 years ago

    When I studied costume in college, this was one of those thongs that got explained on day one.

    Historically, women's fashion was much more complicated up until modern times and they frequently had dressers to assist them.  Since the majority of humans are right-handed, button sides developed to play to that.  Men, who tended to dress themselves have garments that button on the right.  Women, who tended to be dressed by some standing in front of them, facing them, have garments that button on the left...which facilitates a right-handed person doing the dressing.

    1. Ivorwen profile image71
      Ivorwenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      This is what I learned too.

    2. Shadesbreath profile image84
      Shadesbreathposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      THAT is freaking cool.  I love tidbits like this.  Thanks for sharing!

      1. John Holden profile image59
        John Holdenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        If you like that then how about the reason for most spiral staircases going in a clockwise direction?

        Most people are right handed and most attackers will be trying to go up the staircase which means that their sword arm will be tightly hampered by the centre pole allowing only half hearted swipes at ankles.
        The defender on the other hand will have his sword arm in plenty of free space enabling him to aim forceful blows to the opponents head.

        1. Shadesbreath profile image84
          Shadesbreathposted 7 years agoin reply to this

          Oh, that is interesting!  I write fantasy, and that's a fun sort of detail that will make its way into a fight scene.  Where did you learn that?  Do you have a book of such things you can recommend?

          1. John Holden profile image59
            John Holdenposted 7 years agoin reply to this

            I'm not really sure where I picked it up, possibly at school but I do have an interest in history. I can't think of a specific book at the moment but I'll have a think.

            Probably a book on castles would be the thing, the designs are generally very clever. For example, think of a square or round castle. You are one the battlements, I'm on the ground. If I manage to make the foot of the wall I'm virtually inaccessible to you and can tunnel through at my leisure. If the bottom of the wall is flared out, I'm more vulnerable but still have some protection from you. If however the ground plan is a multi-leaved clover leaf. There is no shelter at all, anywhere. If I try to scale the wall there is no point where you can't put an arrow in my back. If I try to tunnel, you are always behind me.

    3. qwark profile image54
      qwarkposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Relache:
      I'll be! Thanks!
      Sounds plausible.    :-)

  4. profile image0
    Brenda Durhamposted 7 years ago

    Distinguishing them from men's clothing perhaps?

    Oh, relache already explained it, even better than I could've for sure.

  5. John Holden profile image59
    John Holdenposted 7 years ago

    Yup, Relache gives the most common and most logical explanation. Women have dressers, men don't.

  6. jondav profile image74
    jondavposted 7 years ago

    I was always told it was from the time when men used to carry swords. If the garment buttoned up the other (female) way the hilt of the sword could get caught as you draw the sword from its sheath.

    This is a bit of a pain if you were left handed though lol

 
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