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jump to last post 1-20 of 20 discussions (22 posts)

Have you ever used a typewriter?

  1. CatsPage profile image77
    CatsPageposted 5 years ago

    Have you ever used a typewriter?

  2. multiculturalsoul profile image81
    multiculturalsoulposted 5 years ago

    I started my writing career at age 6 with an Underwood Olivetti (ca. 1952). It was tough on the pinkies, but I managed. Correction fluid and I were old friends.

    I graduated to a Smith-Corona (with the then-fancy correction cartridge) in the early 1980s. I took that typewriter to college, charged $3 a page, and had plenty of pizza money because so many of my peers couldn't (or wouldn't) type at all.

    My grandfather typed most of his sermons on a 1920 Underwood Standard Portable that had its own case. That thing still works ... if you don't mind the keys sticking every now and again.

  3. PDXBuys profile image77
    PDXBuysposted 5 years ago

    Yes, but not for a long time.  I think I have an antique black Underwood in storage.  It is a work of art.  I had good student typewriter in 80's.  Had my mom ship it to England when I was stationed there in the Air Force.  Sadly, it was damaged in shipping.  But I was so attached to it I still have it, just to look at.  Mom had a lime green Wards Signature typewriter in the house when I was growing up.  Wrote a few school papers on that one.  It had the pushbuttons on the right side so you could select the black, red, or correction ribbon.

  4. janshares profile image96
    jansharesposted 5 years ago

    Yes, up until the late eighties I think. Funny question.

  5. dailytop10 profile image92
    dailytop10posted 5 years ago

    When I was just a kid. My grandfather let's me play with an old typewriter.haha

  6. JimTxMiller profile image78
    JimTxMillerposted 5 years ago

    Made my living on a typewriter for years as a print journalist.

  7. John MacNab profile image84
    John MacNabposted 5 years ago

    I have.  I've used old manual typewriters like Royal and Underwood and electric typewriters.  The electric one I was using right up to my first computer.  You may find this hard to believe, but a doctor's secretary near us still uses an electric typewriter.
    The last time we were in the waiting room, we heard her typing and a young lady beside us had no idea what the sound was.

  8. elayne001 profile image81
    elayne001posted 5 years ago

    I wrote a hub about it some time ago:

    http://elayne001.hubpages.com/hub/What- … -Secretary

  9. moonfairy profile image80
    moonfairyposted 5 years ago

    Yes, and it seems like eons ago! I took typing in high school and I still remember the "a s d f j k l ;" rants from my instuctor!!!! I also took shorthand but remember absolutely nothing of that!!

  10. Glimmer Twin Fan profile image99
    Glimmer Twin Fanposted 5 years ago

    Definitely.  I took typing at the local community college in high school and I remember the teacher would give us stars on a chart if we did well each class.  I loved using a typewriter.  Years ago at a job, we hired an office assistant.  At the time we still had forms that needed to be filled out by typewriter, and when she first started she did not know what a typewriter was and could not figure out how to turn it on.  I remember feeling a little bit older that day.

  11. Vacation Trip profile image70
    Vacation Tripposted 5 years ago

    Yes, in my school days when I was in my 7th standard.

  12. pagesvoice profile image84
    pagesvoiceposted 5 years ago

    While in high school my best friend and I had brainstormed on various ways to meet girls. Yes, we were typical teenage goofy boys. Well, we decided where better to hook up with some female classmates than in a typing class. We were taught on the old manual typewrites and lo and behold, my friend and I became so competitive that we actually ended up being quite good at speed and accuracy of typing. Truth be told, we became so proficient in typing class that both of us won awards from New York State. Oh, and in case you are curious, we never did meet any girls in that class. Alas, the saga of two boys seeking two girlfriends continued for quite some time and we could have starred in our own "Happy Days" episode.

    1. JimTxMiller profile image78
      JimTxMillerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Perhaps you should have tried Home Economics?

    2. pagesvoice profile image84
      pagesvoiceposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Good point. Although I loved my wood and sheet metal classes there were sadly no females to be found in those areas, back in the day.

  13. business-stuff profile image58
    business-stuffposted 5 years ago

    Yes, but i was about 10-12 year ago, when i go for training to learn english typing.

  14. howtobeasuccess profile image72
    howtobeasuccessposted 5 years ago

    I have seen a typewriter used by my Grandfather, but sadly i was not able to use it for anything. That was a time that i was still too young so i see the machine more as a toy rather than something that is useful to me..

  15. Efficient Admin profile image93
    Efficient Adminposted 5 years ago

    I learned how to type on a typewriter including using those white strips whenever a typo needed correcting. In high school we didn't have computers but going into college the PC was just starting to come on the scene, but even then in college we were using the IBM Selectric typewriters and IMHO to this day those are the finest typewriters IBM ever created.

  16. theryanpride profile image78
    theryanprideposted 5 years ago

    Yes when i was a little girl i would think it was the best thing ever. I could write letters on it know it is all digital and you have to have a printer to print your letter.Unlike the typewriter you hit a button and it is on the paper easy no fight getting the printer to work.

  17. asiacube profile image42
    asiacubeposted 5 years ago

    Yes, but it is long time ago.. love hear the voice from typewriter.. big_smile

  18. moronkee profile image78
    moronkeeposted 5 years ago

    oh yes! I like it . I still have my portable typewriter at home and I use it to type letters.

  19. Mike Marks profile image74
    Mike Marksposted 5 years ago

    so just how old are you trying to make me feel?  Yeah, and my first typewriter weighed a ton.  In the late sixties I used one to lay out a fanzine I was publishing via offset printing, and typing every page one mistake, one misstruck letter, and I'd have to type the whole page over again, I mean I could use this white powder strip stuff to cover up the error, (I'm not sure Mike Nesmith's mom even invented "whiteout" yet... and don't tell this old man you don't know who Mike Nesmith is, or "whiteout")  but then the printed page would look sloppy and unprofessional... the first time I used a word processor it felt like heaven... and I've used rotary phones (man, when you dialed that furthest digit, 0, and had to wait for the dial to rotor all the way back in place before you could dial the next, man dialing 7 digits would probably seem like it was taking forever to a modern person like yourself... and I even remember having to get out of my chair to switch my tv to another one of the three b&w stations before remotes were invented.... so, have you ever had dinosaur bone soup?))

    ...

  20. SunkistGirl profile image61
    SunkistGirlposted 5 years ago

    Aaahhhh.....the memories come flooding in!! My mom had an "old" (considered antique nowadays) typewriter. The kind with the open center and ink ribbon, where the keys used more often than others would stick and you would have "pick" them back into place. I think they called these manual typewriters. I "wrote" my first story on that ole typewriter. I was younger than 10 yrs old. Later on, mom got an electronic typewriter, creatively called a electronic word press. She loved this because there was a built in word corrector. When a word was missed spelled, the system would beep. Of course, you had to figure out how to spell the word correctly. After high school and for college, I bought my first computer and have never turned back to the typewriter since. I have had to use the typewriter for a few projects, but mostly just collects dust and remains a happy memory!

 
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