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Would you write a hub about (and pardon my spelling please,) Kabookie dancers?

  1. Enelle Lamb profile image86
    Enelle Lambposted 6 years ago

    Would you write a hub about (and pardon my spelling please,) Kabookie dancers?

    Am I correct in understanding that Kabookie is a form of theater?

  2. thooghun profile image82
    thooghunposted 6 years ago

    I adore writing hubs about things I know nothing about, and this would be one of them. It gives me the chance to learn about it. That's what I love about writing, it's a learning process without peers.

  3. Patty Inglish, MS profile image95
    Patty Inglish, MSposted 6 years ago

    This would be a wonderful Hub. I studied about Kabuki in my Asian Studies core, when the art form was permitted only to be performed in Japan. Japanese No Theater (some called it "Kabuki Lite") was allowed to leave Japan and perform for other nations. Since that time, Kabuki performers and plays have been permitted to travel to other countries; just as the monks of Wushu/Kungfu were permitted to travel to USA for the first time to Indiana in the 1990s.   

    I would love to see this Hub on Kabuki, and one on Chinese Opera and other Asian theater traditions. Very good question, RedElf.

  4. Enelle Lamb profile image86
    Enelle Lambposted 6 years ago

    Thank you Patty, I saw the interview with Akbok in the newsletter and thought Kabuki would be a great subject! (Thanks for the spelling correction LOL)

  5. cat on a soapbox profile image96
    cat on a soapboxposted 6 years ago

    I'd say, yes!  Kabuki is very intetresting and rarely written about. Go for it!

  6. Jmarket Staff profile image61
    Jmarket Staffposted 6 years ago

    I think it will be a great topic to cover. Kabuki has so much history behind it. You will surely learn so much Japanese culture while researching and writing.

  7. profile image0
    gkanekoaposted 6 years ago

    I love your spelling.

    I have nothing to say about Kabookie (Kabuki) dancers, but this reminds me of what my friends and I noticed while we lived in Japan.

    Americans tend to emphasize the middle the word
    Example: ShiBOOya (as in booya in your face) vs. the correct pronunciation: Shi-bu-ya

    Well, I guess I could say one thing about Kabuki:

    check out Takarazuka Revue: http://kageki.hankyu.co.jp/english/ . Instead of the men dressing like women the women dress like men.

 
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