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Do you think most people over or underestimate the power of hurricanes?

  1. Mighty Mom profile image84
    Mighty Momposted 5 years ago

    Do you think most people over or underestimate the power of hurricanes?

  2. Homesteading profile image61
    Homesteadingposted 5 years ago

    Awesome question !!  It's actually strange.  They pay close attention to what is going on, but then underestimate it all, especially the strength behind any storm, let alone a hurricane.  I live in North Central Florida (Gainesville like area).  Majority of the time, we ride it out with winds of/to 50mph with extreme rain.  And even then, people forget trees fall, power goes out, roofs leak and ugh-oh ... they didn't store enough water.  Underestimate ... for sure!

  3. KK Trainor profile image61
    KK Trainorposted 5 years ago

    I think the only people who really underestimate them are the ones who have never ridden one out. It's easy to think it's just another big rainstorm until you've seen the aftermath first hand. And living without power is one thing, but not being able to drive down the street or call anyone even on your cell phone is another. Plus the fact that it's generally pretty hot when they come through, it can get pretty steamy in the house afterwards!

    1. Homesteading profile image61
      Homesteadingposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      KK Trainor ... I agree with the ones that have never ridden one out before.  Having never been through an actual hurricane where the eye is involved, all I can say is the bands alone scared me enough, to never want to be in the center of any storm.

    2. KK Trainor profile image61
      KK Trainorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Would you believe my friends in NOLA are saying they will be staying in town to 'ride it out' now that Isaac is coming? After everything, the old thinking still prevails! Hope they don't need federal help again; it's their own fault if they stay.

  4. teyeger82 profile image77
    teyeger82posted 5 years ago

    I think people underestimate. I think part of the reason for this is because many people stay on alert from June to November and many forecasts are broadcast warning of storms at sea that MAY impact land. People become numb to hearing the warnings and then when one does come ashore, they are either not prepared or have waited too long to prepare or leave. As KK Trainor said, unless you have ridden one out or seen the aftermath in person, you really cannot appreciate the destruction and inconvenience they bring.

    1. Homesteading profile image61
      Homesteadingposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Teyeger, excellent point.  The hurricanes of 2004, it was out of control with which way the meteorologist were predicting.  Say this, go there. Each of those 4 outer bands had me evacuating.  All was well outside of those winds, but why risk it?

  5. lburmaster profile image85
    lburmasterposted 5 years ago

    It depends on who is doing the talking. Once I heard, "a hurricane is coming! Board up your windows! What do we do?". The first thing to do is to understand the levels of hurricanes so you can know what to expect and how to be ready for them. Living in Florida for 11 years has shown me what to do. Then I moved to Texas where there are few hurricanes and no one was prepared for Katrina. Mainly because there are only light hurricanes here. The bottom line is: education.

    1. KK Trainor profile image61
      KK Trainorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Well I don't know what part of Texas you live in, but we have pretty bad storms here. Just tell the people of Galveston that the storms here are light...

    2. lburmaster profile image85
      lburmasterposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The Woodlands, near Houston. We hear about people from Galveston a lot because it's only an hour away. They are cry babies who whine after getting a cut on their knee.

    3. KK Trainor profile image61
      KK Trainorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Wow, that is a disgusting thing to say, I guess you didn't hear about Ike wiping Galveston off the map a few years back. Lucky the Woodlands is far enough north you can live without fear. Good for you.

    4. lburmaster profile image85
      lburmasterposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      No. I heard. It wasn't that upsetting. Calling Galveston a beach is insanity. Water should be clear and blue, not brown and black.

    5. KK Trainor profile image61
      KK Trainorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You are disturbed.

    6. Homesteading profile image61
      Homesteadingposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Iburmaster ... Are you trying to pick a fight?  If so, do it on your posts, okay?  You said education is the key, then turn and insult others due to location.  That's not education.  That's trash talking.  Please, do it on your wall & respect min

  6. profile image0
    Sarra Garrettposted 5 years ago

    I believe most people underestimate the power of hurricanes.  You can never estimate what Mother Nature is capable of doing with her storms.  Some are nothing and some are horrendous like Hurricane Katrina.  I worked storm duty as an insurance adjuster and we would go to the area before the storm and wait it out. I would stay in a hotel room on the 3rd floor with the carpet soaking wet. The people I would speak with were devastated by even just a small storm, not to mention that your homeowners policy puts a 10% deductible on the value of your home for storm damage.....you can have a $30,000 deductible or more.  It's worth putting up hurricane shutters or plywood on your home to protect it and yourself.....it's a small chore compared to having to pay for all repairs out of pocket.  When the authorities say get out, please get out.

  7. profile image0
    Larry Wallposted 5 years ago

    I have been through Andrew, Katrina, Rita and Gustav and a few less notable hurricanes.

    I do not think you really understand the impact of even a minor hurricane until you have lived through it. When I see news clips of people staying at beach front hotels and having "hurricane parties." My skin crawls. There is a good chance that resources that could be used elsewhere  for people who could not evacuate, because some people though it would be cool to watch one through a glass window.

    People die in hurricanes, homes are flooded, buildings are destroyed. It is one of the most powerful forces of nature. If you are near the coast and you get a warning about a hurricane, I recommend you pack your bags and leave as soon as possible.

    1. Homesteading profile image61
      Homesteadingposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Now this is a man that knows the power of a punch !!!!  Those were some vicious hurricanes.  And yes to getting out !!  If anyone is in doubt, watch some videos on the hurricanes named.  Andrew ... WOW!  Happy you are here to voice truth.  smile

    2. KK Trainor profile image61
      KK Trainorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I lived in NOLA for years, moved across the lake just before Katrina so only saw the wind. But had to leave because of other problems afterwards. Rita came to Houston just after, so saw that too, although only the edges of it. Part of life down here.

  8. tipstoretireearly profile image82
    tipstoretireearlyposted 5 years ago

    I think most people underestimate the power of hurricanes.  They get lulled into thinking they're not too bad because most of the time they don't suffer a direct hit.  So when they do get hit directly, it hurts.

 
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