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Hub page score

  1. alekhouse profile image80
    alekhouseposted 7 years ago

    Is it true that you can never have a hubpage score of 100 unless you have Ad Sense or your hubs are making money? Just wondered.

    1. 60
      badcompany99posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      My guess is it's money making related because my Adsense one got to 100 and was making me like $60 dollars a month for the 2 months it was at 100 then as it faded away so did it's score. I sometimes actually use the top 20 Hubs as a guide as to what to write about next as they are the one's making Hubpages the money!

      1. emdi profile image71
        emdiposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I think its a good idea

    2. 0
      rednckwmnposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      that is interesting, but why would anyone care about thier score if they do not have adsene? ps hos your jellies n stuff? i am so jealous smile

      1. alekhouse profile image80
        alekhouseposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I guess it would depend on how competitive you are.

    3. darkside profile image80
      darksideposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      No, it's not true.

      I have a couple of hubs (ironically HubScore is the first hub I ever wrote that made it to 100) that have no Adsense ads and they managed to hit a HubScore of 100.

      It took me almost a year before I had a hub that made it to 100. The first time it happens it feels like a big deal, but it's really just a matter of getting everything else right (quality original content) and then a decent spike in traffic. If the traffic maintains and it becomes a stream it might stay at 100, otherwise expect it to drop.

      1. vancouver profile image60
        vancouverposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Just quickly, I know its a complicated process but how many words would you recommend, pictures, video etc?
        thanks for your insight.

        regards,
        JR

        1. darkside profile image80
          darksideposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          It would depend on the topic and how detailed you want to get.

          For instance, lets say I do a hub on the Roman Empire. We're covering about 300 or so years, so it could be really big. But you'd only want to be fairly general with your overview. You could do one on Augustus and you could really go to town with the details. A person could easily write 1,200 words on both. The first would mention Augustus, but if you got too detailed covering each and every emperor, it would be far too long.

          So when I cover a BIG subject area, I'm far briefer. I could very well have a larger word count if I focus in one specific points that is covered in the first instance.

          So my tip is, if it's a wide topic, keep it brief, and interesting. If you want to get specific, grab it and squeeze the hell out of it.

          300 words, I think, is far too short for any article. Unless it's just one small part of a lesson. Otherwise I like around 700 words. That's enough meat for a person to get a grasp of whatever is being discussed. You can go longer, but don't bore the reader. 1,500 words would be the most I'd aim for. Much larger than that and I'd be wondering how I could split it for the sake of making it easier for the reader to digest.

          When I write my hub on "How To Hub" I could have gone into detail about Capsules, but that would have been a very long and unwieldy hub. So I have a hub on Capsules that I link to from the How To Hub hub. If I were teaching it in a class room, I wouldn't want information overload. I think the same applies online.

          Photos help break up the text. If they're appropriate to the subject matter. I'd prefer to have too few than too many. At least one. Two is better. Three if it's going to be around 700 words. Four or five (I'm just coming up with this off the top of my head, I haven't stopped to check my own hubs) if it's going to be an epic. If photos or screenshots or graphics are to specifically illustrate a point, then it wouldn't be a problem how many there are. Just consider how they're arranged with the capsules so it flows nicely.

          Videos are very handy to explain information. My hub All Dumbbell Workout wouldn't have been the same without them. I explain each method, but the videos reinforce the learning.

          Experiment. Think about what works best for you, and also the reader. When I write I do so with humans in mind, not search engines. I'll tweak some headings for the benefit of search engines, as well as tags I think complement the subject matter, but otherwise I want it to be something that I'd enjoy reading if I was visiting it for the first time.

          1. vancouver profile image60
            vancouverposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Thank you for your very informative post, excellent food for thought. I will take what you have said and try it out myself. Now
            that being said. If the point of adsense is to get people to click away from your article. Do you want them to stick around and read a 700 or 1500 word article? or would you rather them read it briefly and then exit view an ad..

            Older SEO in training, 

            JR wink

            1. darkside profile image80
              darksideposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              I want to do the subject justice. If they're inclined to click, they will. But an article that isn't up to scratch isn't going to be forwarded to a friend, bookmarked or even indexed by Search Engines as well as the one that is of top quality.

              1. vancouver profile image60
                vancouverposted 7 years ago in reply to this

                I suppose it all depends on your target audience and agenda.

                regards,
                JR

          2. alekhouse profile image80
            alekhouseposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Darkside, This is really good advice. I pretty much take this approach. I rarely go over 700 words, but I use lots of graphics and videos.

          3. Ken R. Abell profile image85
            Ken R. Abellposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Thank you for this information.  I signed up three weeks ago & just started doing hubs this weekend.  The word count & info about pictures was very helpful to me.
            Blessings,
            Ken

  2. vancouverdentist profile image61
    vancouverdentistposted 7 years ago

    fascinating, i wonder if thats the case. Ill have to try that out.

  3. sparksdaniel2000 profile image79
    sparksdaniel2000posted 7 years ago

    hubscore is also rated by traffic, so adsense probably does account for some of he score...money = power

    1. alekhouse profile image80
      alekhouseposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I was talking about "hubpage" score, not hub score

  4. 0
    \Brenda Scullyposted 7 years ago

    i enjoyed reading that..... it has taken me a while to get to the stage where i can take on board all the technical stuff......

    Managed to get through that  as it was interesting and informative, usually don't read very long ones at all...... agree breaking up with pictures encourages the reader to keep going nice  thanks

  5. yoshi97 profile image87
    yoshi97posted 7 years ago

    My recommendation follows Darky's, with a bit of added info...

    Try to break up your text into several text modules with topics for each module. Write no more than 100 words per text box unless you can really justify it, as you are creating mini topics within the whole to capture the reader by the title transitions.

    Also, about every three or four text modules throw in something different - like a picture, a link, or a video. This keeps the reader's eyes from fuzzing together over the text. smile

    1. alekhouse profile image80
      alekhouseposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      These are good ideas. I've tried the breaking into several text messages approach, I think BC or Goldentoad suggested it, and it really worked well.

 
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