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How about the dumbest book ever?

  1. Below-average Joe profile image61
    Below-average Joeposted 7 years ago

    Anyone ever read a book where at the very end as you close the back cover you say to yourself, "What a piece of crap" and had no idea why you stuck with it?

    For me, "The DaVinci Code".  It sold 8 bazillion copies and I was told it was really good by so many people. I finally read it to see what the hoopla was all about.  Never listen to the masses.  Terrible book.  It read like he knew he was writing it to be a movie.  The pace of the novel is quick, which is it's only redeeming value because it meant that it was over quick.

    Oh yeah, "Flowers in the Attic" was pretty bad too.  Never listen to your sister either.

    1. profile image0
      cosetteposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      yes that has happened to me. i can't remember the name of the book but i did have the same reaction..."what a piece of crap". hmm, maybe it WAS the DaVinci Code... neutral

    2. profile image60
      michael tposted 7 years ago in reply to this
    3. ssasa profile image61
      ssasaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      For me the book "The Great Horse Ride" is the dumbest in the world. The books goes like this: Jiahaa … ihiii … clip clop clip clop clip clop clip clop clip clop clip clop clip clop...

  2. profile image0
    L. Andrew Marrposted 7 years ago

    Twilight by Stephanie Meyer (Or however her surname is spelt)

    Or any of the Harry Potter books.

  3. Uninvited Writer profile image83
    Uninvited Writerposted 7 years ago

    I can't remember any really bad books, I usually don't get very far if I hate them smile I got some fantasy/mystery thing to review and barely got beyond the 1st chapter.

  4. profile image0
    bloodnlatexposted 7 years ago

    Dynanetix By L. Ron Hubbard

    1. profile image0
      cosetteposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      it is incredible to think that he spawned a whole "religion" after a bet with a friend.

      or so i have heard.

    2. Paradise7 profile image84
      Paradise7posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Big ditto.  What a waste of time!  That'd be my #1, too.

      Stephen King, "Desperation", comes in at an awfully close second.  I was a fan of Mr. King, and stayed a fan of Mr. King, but that book simply wasn't worth the paper it was printed on.

      1. deartfuldodger profile image62
        deartfuldodgerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I think all of Kings stories have been increasingly weak - im not sure about the chronology - but The Stand and IT and christine and drak half were awesome - it seem anything in the last 5 years hasnt been worth going past the first chapter

        1. Paradise7 profile image84
          Paradise7posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          Stephen King got me back again, with "The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon" and "Hearts in Atlantis", then he lost me again completely with that terrible collection of shorter stories, I forgot what it's called.  I think now he's shot his wad, that's ok, he did good while he was going.

  5. Holden Kennedy profile image59
    Holden Kennedyposted 7 years ago

    Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer.
    it was MUCH too experimental and had too little redeeming value. plus, the main character is a little bitch.

    1. deartfuldodger profile image62
      deartfuldodgerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Im sad to hear that
      Everything is illuminated by Foer, is also very experimental and may be the best modern story i have ever read.

      i was looking for to his next book very much

      1. Holden Kennedy profile image59
        Holden Kennedyposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        i know, and i LOVED Everything is Illuminated (and in most cases, Foer's experimentation supplemented the story). But I just wasn't a huge fan of EL&IC.

  6. torimari profile image80
    torimariposted 7 years ago

    I TRIED reading "Pilgrim's Progress." I didn't know what I was getting into but it was a snooze...it was on a college reading list and bleh.

    Oh, Dreiser's (or whatever his name is) Sister Carrie is a book I despise. So droll.

    1. Uninvited Writer profile image83
      Uninvited Writerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I really liked Sister Carrie if I recall correctly smile

      I read Pilgrim's Progress also... I think I made it through, but just barely.

      1. torimari profile image80
        torimariposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        *cringe* smile

      2. profile image60
        Thirteenposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        That was a brilliant book, one of my favs !

        1. profile image60
          HealthTipposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          You silly girl as if you could get the meaning of John Bunyan, you sound like some silly college girl being given a reading list !

          1. torimari profile image80
            torimariposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            My bad if I'm wrong to assume this was for me but, yes, it was on my reading list from college last year. Regardless, though I didn't finish Pilgrim's Progress, I still graduated with my English BA and an overall 3.8. Maybe if I appreciated Bunyan's dry writing more I'd have a 3.9. Wah.

            Just because they are classics, doesn't mean they are always masterpieces to everyone or hold everyone's interest.

            1. profile image60
              HealthTipposted 7 years ago in reply to this

              Just messing with you my friend, no offence meant for some reason I actually liked this book, I blame a sad religious period in my mid teens, please don't take offence smile

  7. MadWhiteWaitress profile image60
    MadWhiteWaitressposted 7 years ago

    It really depends on the individual who is reading said book.  Their age group, religion, personal taste, and even how much the book has been 'hyped up' by others.  One rule of thumb I live by is: keep your expectations low & you can never be dissapointed! wink

  8. profile image0
    TMinutposted 7 years ago

    The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka. My son just had to read this, he begged me to read it to him because he didn't think he could stand it. I see what he meant.

    One of the questions he was asked on it was: Do you think it should have ended differently? His answer was: No, this was the right ending, any other ending might have made sense and that wouldn't have fit with this story.

  9. rebekahELLE profile image91
    rebekahELLEposted 7 years ago

    if after the first 50 pages it doesn't grab me, I put it down.

  10. M Burger profile image60
    M Burgerposted 7 years ago

    1984 by Orwell. It was boring. I still don't understand the hype about it.

    1. profile image0
      L. Andrew Marrposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Try having to study it...it's awful.

  11. profile image0
    YellowBrickRoseposted 7 years ago

    Breaking Dawn, by Stephenie Meyer.

    Let's count the ways: Biologically impossible baby, most horrifically graphic birth scene ever in which the situation is fraught with medical inaccuracies (placentas can detach without the baby suffocating OR the mother projectile-vomiting blood, FYI) then Death Baby is immediately snatched up by a pedophile who used to be hot for her mom. Cue Death Baby's parents pretending to care about her while foisting her off on the other Mormons--I mean vampires--while they go off and have sex.
    And Bella turns into the biggest Mary Sue vamp of them all.

    Oh, and all the tension leads up to...a non-battle, in which once the Baddies realize their mistake, it's all "Oh. Okay. Bye, then." And then it's "perfect circle of forever."

  12. Pearldiver profile image87
    Pearldiverposted 7 years ago

    For me it was the Queen Victoria birthday edition of Hustler ... by Larry Flintstone big_smile

    1. profile image0
      Justine76posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      lol you toatlly beat what i was going to say....too funny...

  13. EmpressFelicity profile image83
    EmpressFelicityposted 7 years ago

    Lady Chatterley's Lover by D. H. Lawrence.  He really should be given a posthumous Bad Sex Award, if he hasn't been already.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2004/de … adsexaward

    1. Paradise7 profile image84
      Paradise7posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Hah!  lol

  14. deartfuldodger profile image62
    deartfuldodgerposted 7 years ago

    I think James Patterson and Dean Koontz are tied as being the most terrible writers who receive to much acclaim.

    Good stories, but horrific writing - they should have both just itched their ideas to some writers with skill in the craft

    stephanie meyers stories are rather bad, ut unless your a preteen girl, its just something to be avoided

    i didnt like pilgrims progress either, but read the whole thing - think 1984 and anthing by huxley or orwell is amazing

    some people are thinkers, others like to be spoonfed, that doesnt speak to the quality of the writer

    bad books just arent memorable unless overhyped

    just to show im not overly pretentious, i enjoyed ALL of dan browns books

  15. rebekahELLE profile image91
    rebekahELLEposted 7 years ago

    I'm amazed at what get's published. hmm

    1. Paradise7 profile image84
      Paradise7posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Oh, yes, agreed.  I'm amazed at what doesn't get published, too.  I've read some mighty good hubs that never had a look-in from print media.

      1. rebekahELLE profile image91
        rebekahELLEposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        there are excellent writers here, I'm so impressed. in fact, my book reading has taken a nose dive, not because I don't want to finish the books I started. I get involved reading here.

        it's like they're sitting on the counter looking at me... hmm

      2. bonny2010 profile image60
        bonny2010posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Iagree with that, but if you every read any of my hub please be truthful but very very gentle lol.

  16. retellect profile image79
    retellectposted 7 years ago

    men are from mars women are from venus - utter rubbish! I was quite impressed at first and tried the methods for several years with unsuccessful results. Pity sad

    1. EmpressFelicity profile image83
      EmpressFelicityposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I've read this and I think it's bollocks as well.  It might work for some couples, but it doesn't apply to any of the relationships I've had (if anything, it's always been me who's the cave dweller, not my male other half).  Verdict: about as much use as an ashtray on a motorbike.

  17. gracenotes profile image92
    gracenotesposted 7 years ago

    Hmmm....
    My problem with current fiction is that the authors seem to start their stories brilliantly, but just don't know how to wrap them up.  It's a shame, but I'm seeing a lot of that.  Therefore, I can't rate such books very well.  Another thing, at least with American fiction, is that they all seem to write 400-page books.  What is up with that?  Is that becoming a standard part of a book contract?  I'm sorry -- writers should use only as many words as they need to tell their stories!  It is ridiculous to pad a book.

    Examples of books I can't rate highly because of the mess the authors made of the endings --

    1.  Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks
    2.  Plain Truth by Jodi Picoult
    3.  The Memory Keeper's Daughter by Kim Edwards

  18. Stimp profile image80
    Stimpposted 7 years ago

    hands down:  Dianetics.  Sorry, Scientologists.

    He makes a bunch of "factual" statements but does not have a reference of where this factual psychological info came from.  I did not finish it.

  19. Lisa HW profile image81
    Lisa HWposted 7 years ago

    It may not quite be the dumbest ever, but it as pretty darned dumb...

    "Love Story" by Erich Segal.

  20. LRobbins profile image79
    LRobbinsposted 7 years ago

    The Shopaholic Series.  I'd heard great things about it, they're all best sellers and I was looking for a light read, but never made it past page 50 - couldn't relate and didn't see what all the fuss was about.

  21. Fugitive From Now profile image60
    Fugitive From Nowposted 7 years ago

    Forgive me but I can't read James Joyce to save my life.

    1. twalker74 profile image85
      twalker74posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I don't believe anyone can REALLY read Joyce. I think Ulysses was his big middle finger to the establishment at the time. He did say something like, "I wrote this solely for critics to [chew] on for the next hundred years." Not a direct quote, but close. It is an interesting read, but I will never attempt to claim I got it. I actually spoke to a lit professor a month or so ago about this and she claim that anyone who said they understood was full of [expletive].

      Worst Book Ever- The Da Vinci Code. At least I forgot for like ten pages that Dianetics was about scientology. so that's second cause I never forgot for a second that Brown couldn't write. and if anyone wants to hate a writer for stealing time away from their life I read a book called Manifest Destiny a while back. That was awful too.

      1. Jackson Riddle profile image66
        Jackson Riddleposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I respect a man that can do that (in regards to the quote [the one that Joyce alledgedly said]), although I haven't read the book( I know the general gist of it though)...yet.

        1. twalker74 profile image85
          twalker74posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          I am right there with you. The only way I kinda remember the quote was due to the fact the I was in utter awe when a teacher told me. Right away I thought...That guy is the man!

  22. profile image0
    Ghost32posted 7 years ago

    The Black Tower series of books by Stephen King.  I read through the whole thing, actually enjoyed one of the volumes, finally found the final book in a used bookstore and made it to the ending, and--decided to provide King with a lifetime boycott.  Haven't touched another page of his prose since that third rate (or maybe 56th rate) ending.  He's often referred to himself as a "hack who got lucky".  After that one, I finally understood why.

  23. Jackson Riddle profile image66
    Jackson Riddleposted 7 years ago

    I really want to read it now. I think though I should also tackle Mein Kampf , to see the overall mindset of Hitler would be fascinating, not nessacarily good, but fascinating.

  24. twalker74 profile image85
    twalker74posted 7 years ago

    Ghost 32-- I hate King's novels and I am constantly berated for it. I know what you mean. But if you want a book on writing his is by far the best I have read. I took me over a year of people telling me they would refund the cost if I didn't like it. It is really good. Still won't touch his fiction though.

    Jackson--if you can get through Mein Kampf, more power to you. That was my intention when I picked it up, but just got sick of it. Maybe it'd be different if I could read German.

  25. habee profile image90
    habeeposted 7 years ago

    I guess I'm a nerd. I like the short stories of James Joyce. My favorite is "Araby."

    I also liked Pilgrim's Progress, 1984, and The Metamorphosis. Lady Chatterly was okay, but I prefer Lawrence's short stories. BTW, did you know Lady Chatterly was banned in the US for years?

    I agree with Ghost about King's Dark Tower series. His early novels and short stories were so imaginative - then I think he just ran out of ideas and got burned out.

    1. twalker74 profile image85
      twalker74posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      THe Dead was good and Metamorphosis is one of my two favorite shorts of all time (the other being A Clean Well Lighted Place). Heard about Lady Chatterly, but can't say I'd like to read it.

  26. apricot profile image60
    apricotposted 7 years ago

    'Mutant message down under' - the dumbest thing was I fell for it on first reading.sad  Won't get fooled again as the Who say.

  27. topgunjager profile image61
    topgunjagerposted 7 years ago

    The "Bible" by the craziest people who ever walked the earth=)

  28. habee profile image90
    habeeposted 7 years ago

    The Bible has some beautiful verses in it - even if you don't believe or follow the religious aspects. Strictly from a literary standpoint, the Bible is a great read.

  29. profile image0
    Crazdwriterposted 7 years ago

    Anything by Virgina Woolfe and Jane Austen. *gag*

    1. bonny2010 profile image60
      bonny2010posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I agree now - i rebelled against it when i was at school and I am still rebelling against it - tried to watch a couple of the movies - couldn't cause I was too busy gagging over the script

  30. Jonathan Janco profile image82
    Jonathan Jancoposted 7 years ago

    Peyton Place by Grace Metalious
    such absolutely meaningless f***ing drivel

  31. fishtiger58 profile image81
    fishtiger58posted 7 years ago

    Anything by Tom Clancy, takes him 2 chapters to describe a tree. Boring!!!

    1. twalker74 profile image85
      twalker74posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Haha, I so agree. Steinbeck's "East of Eden" must be your Kryptonite!

  32. profile image0
    lyricsingrayposted 7 years ago

    The Dictionary.  That's dumb alright. sigh. hmm:

  33. profile image0
    Jared in Vegasposted 7 years ago

    I never read The Da Vinci Code, because I read Angels and Demons and thought it was terrible.

  34. bonny2010 profile image60
    bonny2010posted 7 years ago

    yeap I've read plenty of them, can't remember their names,butfor some reason I have slogged on through them.I agree about the DaVinci Code,but I read somewhere that he cleaned his act up with Angels and Demons...saw the movie and hated it. I tried to read Harry Potter, didn't get far, felt I was degrading myself

  35. Happyontheinside profile image74
    Happyontheinsideposted 7 years ago

    It's got to be the little book of calm...

  36. khmohsin profile image60
    khmohsinposted 7 years ago

    "One Hundred Years of Solitude" this book is in Spanish and won Nobel Prize, I read the translation and it was a crap !

  37. i scribble profile image82
    i scribbleposted 7 years ago

    I never made it through the Da Vinci Code. Checked it out of the library (maybe twice) but didn't make it past chapter 3. Some of the sub-plots were interesting, but the part about the monk self-mutilating was just gross to me. The library book was the hardback with oodles of pictures historic places and classic artwork. The problem with that was I couldn't read propped up in bed; the book was just too heavy. Finally saw the movie & wasn't that impressed. And Angels & Demons was even less impressive. Left me with the impression that Dan Brown is just another hack writing sequel after sequel, selling out to what publishers like.

    Why do you think this book series is so popular? What books do you really like?

  38. PrettyPanther profile image84
    PrettyPantherposted 7 years ago

    The worst book I ever read was something by Dean Koontz.  Don't remember what it was called, but it was horrible.

  39. PrettyPanther profile image84
    PrettyPantherposted 7 years ago

    Oh, I just realized you said DUMBEST book ever.  That would have to be "Atlas Shrugged."

    1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
      Ron Montgomeryposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I second, third, and fourth that!  It keeps coming back like a foul fungus.

  40. A2shley profile image61
    A2shleyposted 7 years ago

    I got the idea from a friend to read through Time Magazine's Top 100 novels (http://www.time.com/time/2005/100books/ … _list.html).  I just finished reading "Herzog" by Saul Bellow and was so frustrated.  I stuck it out b/c this book is supposed to be amazing but it was awful. I couldn't feel anything for the characters which made it hard to appreciate the novelty of the writing style.

 
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