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America the christian nation

  1. profile image0
    Baileybearposted 6 years ago

    From reading hubs and forum posts, I was surprised that America considers itself a christian nation, & many american christians were very intolerant of other views (eg saying things like "all atheists are evil", attacking people of other religions, saying, "we were here first" etc)

    I also notice celebrities seem to be over-rated in America too (and overpaid)- TV personalities, actors, sports-people, rich people with no talent etc

    Heard terrible things about the hatred in the bible belt (eg of homosexuals)

    What's so christian about america?

    1. Jerami profile image78
      Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Does any other country exercises the right of freedom of expression as America does?
        I think that maybe in America we have taken this right to extreme. And therefore we may seem to be that which we seem to be.

        And concerning racism ..  Racism is but one form of many prejudices.  I have never been in any group that everyone there were not prejudice concerning some issue  or  group or thing.

      It seems to be human nature that the more abundant that issue of your prejudice becomes in your life the more reactive you become to it. The more verbal.

         Everybody does it!  But most do not admit it. It just isn't as noticeable when the object of your prejudice isn't starring you in the face every day.
          That old -fight or flight- instinct.
          Everyone is prejudice of something, to some degree.
      If you do not know what yours is yet, just wait until it comes up and stares you in the face. You will recognize it then.

          Just saying that it is easy to recognize my faults and become prejudiced against them.

      Everyone is doing it so it must be OK.

      1. stilljustwonderin profile image60
        stilljustwonderinposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Good Morning Brother!  I'm prejudice against alarm clocks!!!

        It is true.  I think most people have a little prejudice in them.  I think a lot of it depends on their upbringing.

        1. Jerami profile image78
          Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Morning...  you going to work today? 
            If so must be second shift ...  don't sound like you had your coffee yet.   

             I'm also prejudiced against empty coffee cups.

          1. stilljustwonderin profile image60
            stilljustwonderinposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            No, no work today, but my coffee cup is empty.  I do need to fill it back up.
            I worked 1st shift last week ( I hate alarm clocks!! )  I think it should be illegal to get out of bed at 5 am!!!!  2nd shift next week.
            You working today?  It is coooooooold here!

            Love ya

            1. Jerami profile image78
              Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Sorry   was over in hub land. 
              No not been working out in the world much for about a week and 1/2 ..  Working around the place though.

                YEP it is cold this AM  down to freezing 70 for a high.

                I'm prejudice against cold.

      2. profile image0
        Baileybearposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        freedom of expression - you mean "free speech"?  As long as you're not someone like Oprah when she made her never going to eat a hamburger again statement which upset beef farmers?
        From outside America, it was reported that most Americans thought going to war was a good idea and people were afraid to speak out against Bush - any truth in that (guess there is some, given the way the Dixie Chicks? were slaughtered for saying something)

    2. Jeff Berndt profile image91
      Jeff Berndtposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      "What's so christian about america?"

      Nothing. It's an officially secular Constitutional Republic that officially guarantees the freedom to believe (or not) and worship (or not) as you see fit, as long as you do not violate another person's rights.

      We were founded by Christians, yes, and we have a Christian majority, yes. But we do not have a Christian foundation, nor are our laws and/or Constitution based on the Ten Commandments or any other Biblical excerpt, no matter what the ideologues agitating in favor of theocracy would have you believe.

      The founders, though most of them were Christians of one stripe or another, deliberately chose not to make the US a "Christian nation," believing that both the church and the state would be better off if they didn't mix.

    3. Beelzedad profile image60
      Beelzedadposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The constitution starts out, "We the People" and there is no mention of Christians or God contained within it. Further to that, in 1797 America made a treaty with Tripoli, declaring that "the government of the United States is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion." smile

  2. ediggity profile image59
    ediggityposted 6 years ago

    We are a Constitutional Republic , with a Christian foundation.Not a Christian Nation.  People are free to practice whatever religion they like.

    We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness

    1. profile image0
      Baileybearposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I get the impression that America is more racist than other western nations too

      1. ediggity profile image59
        ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I guess it depends who you ask, and what race you are.

    2. Pcunix profile image87
      Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Why do you assume "Creator" implies Christian?

      Some of the people involved in that document were Deists, not Christians.  Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin,  Hamilton and others were such.

        "Creator" means what it says and by itself only says that the person using the term can't imagine that something exists without being created.   It doesn't automatically imply gods and even if the person does think the "creator" was some sort of god, it certainly doesn't say that god has all the Christian nonsense attributes.  In the case of Deists, Christian clap-trap was rejected outright.

      1. ediggity profile image59
        ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Who said I assumed anything?  I think that is what you just did.

        1. Pcunix profile image87
          Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          You said "We are a Constitutional Republic , with a Christian foundation"

          You then quoted the part of Declaration of Independence that includes that "Creator" bit.

          You want to explain why it is unreasonable to assume you were trying to say that the quote supported your assertion?

          1. ediggity profile image59
            ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            It was actually to support the fact that people are free to practice whatever religion they like no matter what creator they believe in.  You conveniently left out the rest of what I said and then made an assumption.  In fact, it was the very last sentence I wrote, which was then directly supported by a quote.  Get your facts straight and don't assume.

            1. Pcunix profile image87
              Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Then you simply presented your argument poorly by adding that "Christian foundation" nonsense.  If you had left that out, I wouldn't have said a word.

              Nor did I "conveniently" leave anything out. I quoted you in full.

              1. ediggity profile image59
                ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Oh yeah?  You misinterpreted, so it's my fault.  LOL, you left out the whole last sentence.  I wasn't making an argument, I was stating a fact.  Lastly, it's no secret that there was a strong Christian foundation behind the establishment of the United States.  Discussing this with you is pointless, because you obviously already have your mind made up. God Speed.

                1. Pcunix profile image87
                  Pcunixposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  I left out nothing.   I didn't edit your post in any way.  Go back and look again.  Nor did I "misinterpret".  You assert a Christian foundation; I say  you are mistaken.


                  It is your "fact" that I object to.   The Deists among the Founders were not Christians.  That undermines your assertion of a Christian foundation.   In fact, the foundation was Christians (Christians of competing sects, of course), Jews, Deists, atheists, agnostics and no doubt others if we don't ignore those who sent these representatives to form the Nation -Muslims, Buddhists, Druids, Wiccans...

                  No monolithic Christian foundation no matter how much you want it to be so,.

                  1. Jerami profile image78
                    Jeramiposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    I studied in school (OH so long ago)  that most everyone that came here were running away from the Church organization such as it was at the time.  They were called misfits of every sort. 
                        My teachers taught that the freedom of religion was centered around having a choice as to which ONE.
                       I think that history leaves out the  OR  NOT part.

                  2. ediggity profile image59
                    ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Sorry, but our Founding Fathers disagree with you.


                    http://www.adherents.com/gov/Founding_F … igion.html
                    Religious Affiliation   
                                      # of signers % of signers
                    Episcopalian/Anglican    32    57.1%
                    Congregationalist    13    23.2%
                    Presbyterian            12    21.4%
                    Quaker                     2    3.6%
                    Unitarian or Universalist2    3.6%
                    Catholic             1    1.8%
                    TOTAL                    56    100%

                    Name of Signer    State    Religious Affiliation
                    Charles Carroll    Maryland    Catholic
                    Samuel Huntington    Connecticut    Congregationalist
                    Roger Sherman    Connecticut    Congregationalist
                    William Williams    Connecticut    Congregationalist
                    Oliver Wolcott    Connecticut    Congregationalist
                    Lyman Hall    Georgia    Congregationalist
                    Samuel Adams    Massachusetts    Congregationalist
                    John Hancock    Massachusetts    Congregationalist
                    Josiah Bartlett    New Hampshire    Congregationalist
                    William Whipple    New Hampshire    Congregationalist
                    William Ellery    Rhode Island    Congregationalist
                    John Adams    Massachusetts    Congregationalist; Unitarian
                    Robert Treat Paine    Massachusetts    Congregationalist; Unitarian
                    George Walton    Georgia    Episcopalian
                    John Penn    North Carolina    Episcopalian
                    George Ross    Pennsylvania    Episcopalian
                    Thomas Heyward Jr.    South Carolina    Episcopalian
                    Thomas Lynch Jr.    South Carolina    Episcopalian
                    Arthur Middleton    South Carolina    Episcopalian
                    Edward Rutledge    South Carolina    Episcopalian
                    Francis Lightfoot Lee    Virginia    Episcopalian
                    Richard Henry Lee    Virginia    Episcopalian
                    George Read    Delaware    Episcopalian
                    Caesar Rodney    Delaware    Episcopalian
                    Samuel Chase    Maryland    Episcopalian
                    William Paca    Maryland    Episcopalian
                    Thomas Stone    Maryland    Episcopalian
                    Elbridge Gerry    Massachusetts    Episcopalian
                    Francis Hopkinson    New Jersey    Episcopalian
                    Francis Lewis    New York    Episcopalian
                    Lewis Morris    New York    Episcopalian
                    William Hooper    North Carolina    Episcopalian
                    Robert Morris    Pennsylvania    Episcopalian
                    John Morton    Pennsylvania    Episcopalian
                    Stephen Hopkins    Rhode Island    Episcopalian
                    Carter Braxton    Virginia    Episcopalian
                    Benjamin Harrison    Virginia    Episcopalian
                    Thomas Nelson Jr.    Virginia    Episcopalian
                    George Wythe    Virginia    Episcopalian
                    Thomas Jefferson    Virginia    Episcopalian (Deist)
                    Benjamin Franklin    Pennsylvania    Episcopalian (Deist)
                    Button Gwinnett    Georgia    Episcopalian; Congregationalist
                    James Wilson    Pennsylvania    Episcopalian; Presbyterian
                    Joseph Hewes    North Carolina    Quaker, Episcopalian
                    George Clymer    Pennsylvania    Quaker, Episcopalian
                    Thomas McKean    Delaware    Presbyterian
                    Matthew Thornton    New Hampshire    Presbyterian
                    Abraham Clark    New Jersey    Presbyterian
                    John Hart    New Jersey    Presbyterian
                    Richard Stockton    New Jersey    Presbyterian
                    John Witherspoon    New Jersey    Presbyterian
                    William Floyd    New York    Presbyterian
                    Philip Livingston    New York    Presbyterian
                    James Smith    Pennsylvania    Presbyterian
                    George Taylor    Pennsylvania    Presbyterian
                    Benjamin Rush    Pennsylvania    Presbyterian

                2. Jeff Berndt profile image91
                  Jeff Berndtposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  "Lastly, it's no secret that there was a strong Christian foundation behind the establishment of the United States. "

                  No, you've used true data to reach an erroneous conclusion.

                  While its true that the founders were Christians of one kind or another, (and with varying degrees of devoutness, orthodoxy, and heresy, rather like folks today) it's also true that they deliberately did not give Christianity any privileged status, nor did they even acknowledge its existence, in the Constitution. In fact, they made it clear that there would be no established church, and that the people's would not be stopped from worshipping (or not) according to their own conscience.

                  This whole "Christian Nation" movement is based on distortions and falsehoods, and I'm beginning to think that those distortions and falsehoods are not mere errors of understanding or differences of opinion, but deliberate distortions and falsehoods, designed to give Christianity some kind of privileged status at the expense of every kind of non-Christian, and of every non-orthodox* Christian.

                  This is insidious, tyrannical, and a vile perversion of the intent of the founders (whom the members of the Christian Nation Movement claim to respect and value).

                  Pcunix may have made up his mind, but at least he's not making up facts to suit his argument.

                  *That is, small-O orthodox, meaning 'mainstream,' not the big-O Orthodox Church descended from the church of the Byzantine Empire.

                  1. ediggity profile image59
                    ediggityposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    There is no erroneous conclusion, which is further supported by your indistinguishable contradiction:

                    "We were founded by Christians, yes, and we have a Christian majority, yes. But we do not have a Christian foundation"

                    So, we were founded by Christians, but have no Christian foundation?  Yeah, that makes a lot of sense.

                    Lastly I made no reference to any, "Christian Nation" movement (sic)
                    or any "privileged status"

                    I specifically stated that the United States is a Constitutional Republic with the freedom to choose whatever religion one wants, or none at all.

                  2. dutchman1951 profile image60
                    dutchman1951posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    very well said Jeff, spot on.

    3. Anesidora profile image83
      Anesidoraposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Christian foundation? No, I don't think so. A christian background, I would agree, but not a christian foundation.

  3. profile image60
    exorterposted 6 years ago

    we are not a Christian Nation, just because some one goes to church does not make them Christians, The tares will grow with the wheat,
    Christians are a minority in the U.S.
    It is easy to take the talk.
    But walking the walk is another thing in itself

    1. Castlepaloma profile image23
      Castlepalomaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      USA is a Christian nation by attitude and by number of members and public office leaders.

      The Government and the constitution is science base as the god word is not written in the constitution

  4. Onusonus profile image86
    Onusonusposted 6 years ago

    One of the most influential aspects of American tradition that shapes our thinking is the concept of Freedom of religion. Historically speaking, the only group which has made this trend popular are the Masons. However the fact remains that this country was first settled by seekers of freedom of religious oppression by the English. Those first settlers were all different denominations of Christianity.     

    Always trying to re-write history......

    1. Castlepaloma profile image23
      Castlepalomaposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Columbus was the first European to bring piracy, slavery, Christianity and the gold rush.

      The Mayflower Compact was the basis for a Christian nation based upon Biblical precepts and founded upon a covenant relationship with God.

      The creation of the United States of America involved a significant number of Freemasons, George Washington most prominent among them. One symbol is the cross and bone society

      What will they evolved to next

 
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