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jump to last post 1-10 of 10 discussions (14 posts)

My Dog will not let anyone cut her nails what do we do?

  1. peeples profile image93
    peeplesposted 6 years ago

    My Dog will not let anyone cut her nails what do we do?

    For the last 4 months our 10 year old dog has refused to let us or the vet cut her nails. They even tried holding her down and just couldn't do it. We've tried all the different nail clippers and she won't let us anywhere near her nails. What can we do? She's 60 lbs.

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/6517313_f260.jpg

  2. Theophanes profile image97
    Theophanesposted 6 years ago

    Take her out for a loong day of exercise, wait until she's asleep, and I mean completely out, and then sneak up on her with cat clippers (the ones that look like scissors.) Be gentle and be quick and she won't know the difference. I've done this to a 60 pound pit bull numerous times. It works.

  3. ii3rittles profile image81
    ii3rittlesposted 6 years ago

    If she is healthy, most vets will use mild anesthesia and cut them for you. My mother's dog Laredo (a 10 year old 125lb German shepherd) has to have his clipped every time he gets his teeth cleaned. He won't let anyone near his paws. I was able to cut them once for her with my fiance' bear hugging him so he couldn't move, but its just easier for a vet. You don't want to risk cutting the vain or your dog injuring itself in trying to fight or get away.

    I worked as a vet assistant and it was not uncommon people bringing their dogs in for nail clipping. I believe it was around $25 (because of the anesthesia) and its done once every 3 to 6 months depending on the dog's age, breed, and nail growth.

    1. peeples profile image93
      peeplesposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      She can't have any anesthesia due to high risk medical allergies in the past. I wish we could go this route. Thanks for the answer!

    2. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image58
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      There are other non-pharmacological interventions you can use, for example Composure and an Anxiety Wrap.

  4. profile image0
    Tripawdsposted 6 years ago

    We had this issue with our Wyatt, an 80 pound German Shepherd. This is how we handled it, it works like a charm:

    http://amazon.tripawds.com/2011/07/14/c … t-phobias/

    All it took was one muzzle and a Calming Cap by Gentle Leader. I'm betting it will work for your dog too. Let us know!

    1. peeples profile image93
      peeplesposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Now that looks like a great idea!!! Thanks

    2. AJRRT profile image57
      AJRRTposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I have to try this. It is difficult to trim one of our dogs nails, although it is better than it was when we first got him. He was abandoned at our local animal shelter and it is obvious he was abused. I'll try anything to make things easier on him.

  5. PageC profile image61
    PageCposted 6 years ago

    It sounds like this is a new behavior? Does she possibly have arthritis in her feet? If so, and if she's able to take something for that, it may help her feel more comfortable having her nails clipped.

  6. Marble Sweets profile image59
    Marble Sweetsposted 6 years ago

    My dog is so afraid of getting his nails cut...which I think a previous owner did not do it right...that I can only have the petgroomer do it. He whimpers and cries very bad when it comes to anyone trying to cut his nails.

  7. Charlu profile image78
    Charluposted 6 years ago

    Whether it's clipping my horses (2 and use to have 9) ears or cutting my dogs (5) toenails the one thing I have learned is not to make a big deal out of it.  The main thing is that nobody gets hurt and it is not an unpleasant experience.  If either of the two happens I assure you every time you try it will be a big ordeal that nobody wants to be apart of.

    Start off slow by doing nothing more than lightly rubbing her feet and toes a little. This will accomplish two things. One it will show your dog that every time you go for her feet it is not to cut her nails and an unpleasant experience and two if she does have arthritis or some sort of inflammation in her feet or legs which is bothering her.

    After about a week or so graduate to having the nail clippers so she can see them when your gently petting her feet. Do not clip her nails the first or second time. Then clip one taking just a little off and making sure your clippers are sharp enough so that it doesn't pull or tear.  If you cut to far and hit blood I assure you it will ruin everything.  Do one or two at a time a day or every other day until they are done.

    I do this with horses whether it's a bridle path and ears being clipped which I now do without a halter or them being tied and with my dogs. My dogs I can do while I'm watching tv, after they get a bath or whenever because it's never been a big deal and I started slow. They also know I would never hurt them.

    Good Luck

  8. duffsmom profile image61
    duffsmomposted 6 years ago

    Take her to the vet.  A lot of vets will do it for free or a minimal fee.  My daughter took her Mastiff to a groomer and the groomer quicked 3 or 4 nails.  That is just cruel. Let the vet handle it.

  9. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image58
    Dubuquedogtrainerposted 6 years ago

    Use clicker training to desensitize and counter-condition her to the nail clipping process:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgEwiH8CeUE

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEFrHZbw6tQ

    Restraining her will only continue to make matters worse!

  10. Mountain Blossoms profile image75
    Mountain Blossomsposted 5 years ago

    My brother told me that his vet has a sling with holes for the dogs legs.  He places the dog in this, then cuts the nails.  The dog feels supported and comfortable but cannot escape. 

    I've not seen it myself but it sounds a sensible idea.

 
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