Cutting My Dogs Nails

Jump to Last Post 1-5 of 5 discussions (19 posts)
  1. Rusticliving profile image86
    Rusticlivingposted 6 years ago

    I have cut my dogs nails over the years with no problem. That's because every dog I owned had light colored nails and I could see the quick very easily.
    Polka Dot Butt's nails are as black as black can be! I cut her nails but only a tiny bit because I fear I may cut the quick! I know her nails could stand to have a little more taken off. Does anyone know how to cut BLACK TOE NAILS??

    1. AEvans profile image77
      AEvansposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I use the machine that sands them down. It really does work. You can find them in your local pet store. smile

      1. Rusticliving profile image86
        Rusticlivingposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        We have that little gismo. Thought it would be perfect. She hates it and won't tolerate it. (Neither will my cat) But she will tolerate me clipping. I sure wish I could use it. Would make it so much easier! smile

    2. homesteadbound profile image86
      homesteadboundposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      One thing I know for sure - Have the styptic available.

      1. Rusticliving profile image86
        Rusticlivingposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        I do. Just in case! smile

    3. NatalieSack profile image61
      NatalieSackposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I worked in a pet store during college and ran into this a lot.  The vein inside a dog's toe nails recedes a little bit each time you clip it.  Continue trimming just a small amount of each nail--about a quarter inch.  However, do it more often than you had been doing.  Try clipping a little every other week for about six weeks, or until the nails are at the length you want them to be.

      From that point on, monitor the nails and clip them as needed when they are visibly longer than that ideal length you want them.

      Good luck!

      1. Rusticliving profile image86
        Rusticlivingposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        I've heard that the vein will do that. I have been cutting just a little at a time, just not as often. Perhaps that will be the trick. A little off at a time and more often. Thanks for reminding me about that! smile

        1. Rosie2010 profile image74
          Rosie2010posted 6 years agoin reply to this

          @Rusticliving - good question.  I used to cut my dogs' and cats' nails, but sometimes I cut too much and felt really guilty.  I recently adopted a mix spaniel with black toe nails.  When I took him to the vet, they cut his nails and charged me $12.  Straight cut, not sanding or anything sophisticated.. $12?  Seriously?  I'm doing it myself next time.  So, your question helps me too.  Thanks.

          @Natalie Sack - Thanks for the great info and advice.

          1. Rusticliving profile image86
            Rusticlivingposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            You are so welcome Rosie. I know a lot of people can get nervous about cutting animal nails, but it's something that we can learn. Just another saving tip to be used! Thanks for your comment! smile

    4. couturepopcafe profile image60
      couturepopcafeposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Your dog's name is Polka Dot Butt? lol How do you call her/him? Here PD?  Here Butt/Butty? Here Polka? Here Dot? Here P-Butt?

      I'm not making fun of you. I think the name's adorable.

      1. Rusticliving profile image86
        Rusticlivingposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        hahaha! Polka Dot Butt is her "Nickname." Her real name is Bridgette. She's Dalmation/Retriever Mix, hence the name Polk Dot Butt! We do call her PDot or Polka Dot once in awhile. smile

  2. JayeWisdom profile image92
    JayeWisdomposted 6 years ago

    My dog's nails are black, and she hates to have her feet handled. She likes her groomer and lets him cut them; also, whenever I take her to the vet's, a vet tech cuts them (no extra charge). I stopped trying to cut them myself several years ago because it made both of us nervous! I bought all those gadgets that are supposed to make the process easy, but none of them work for us. (She also doesn't like the buzzing noise of electronics.) I know her nails sometimes get too long between visits to the groomer, but just don't have the nerve to try doing it myself any longer.

    1. Rusticliving profile image86
      Rusticlivingposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I think that is my issue with my dog and the electronic cutters and sanders. She doesn't like the noise. She also doesn't like her paws being handled, by anyone, however, I have been working with her on a daily regimen of feet touching, holding petting and putting my fingers between her toes. She's getting really good about it now. smile

  3. mistyhorizon2003 profile image93
    mistyhorizon2003posted 6 years ago

    Walk her regularly on tarmac and concrete surfaces and her nails will rarely (if ever) need cutting. If this is impossible the advice you have been given about clipping little and often will work well too, (I have been a veterinary assistant at two different surgeries over the years). smile

  4. Rusticliving profile image86
    Rusticlivingposted 6 years ago

    Thanks mistyhorizon! When we adopted her, she had not been taken for many walks or have the opportunity to run so she was a bit overweight. We have been doing what you suggested and it has helped keep her nails from growing longer. They were pretty long to begin with. This has been an ongoing process for my sweet P Dot. All the advice sounds very logical. smile

    1. mistyhorizon2003 profile image93
      mistyhorizon2003posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      No problem, good luck, she has clearly found a loving caring home smile

      1. Rusticliving profile image86
        Rusticlivingposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Awwee.. Thank you misty. Truthfully, we are the lucky ones! smile

  5. NetBlots profile image44
    NetBlotsposted 6 years ago

    If I had to throw in my 2 cents, I would say just take off the tips.

    Hope that helps smile

    1. Rusticliving profile image86
      Rusticlivingposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you NetBlots!  Great advice! smile

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)