Do your dog eats chicken bones ?

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  1. afriqnet profile image52
    afriqnetposted 6 years ago

    Do your dog eats chicken bones ?

    Chicken bones are dangerous to dogs but when growing Up I saw our mixed breed mongrel, chew chicken bones and nothing ever happened. Do your dog eat chicken bones. Have you ever had an emergency due to your dog eating chicken bones?

  2. Millionaire Tips profile image92
    Millionaire Tipsposted 6 years ago

    My dog loves chicken bones.  Chicken bones, especially when cooked, are brittle, and it is possible for them to break and cause damage to the digestive system. I won't give him any, but he winds up finding them when we go for walks - it is amazing how many chicken bones are on the ground!

    1. afriqnet profile image52
      afriqnetposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      There are so many chicken bones on the ground. What would happen if your dog ate one accidentally?

    2. Millionaire Tips profile image92
      Millionaire Tipsposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      So far, nothing bad has happened to my dog from eating chicken bones he finds on his own.  At first, I tried to get him to stop eating them, but then he just ate them faster, which would probably cause more problems.

  3. Faithful Daughter profile image85
    Faithful Daughterposted 6 years ago

    No. You should never feed chicken bones to your pets as they are very dangerous.

    1. afriqnet profile image52
      afriqnetposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for taking time to answer

  4. agilitymach profile image97
    agilitymachposted 6 years ago

    Cooked chicken bones can break into shards that can damage your dog's intestines.  However, uncooked chicken bones are used heavily in the probably millions who feed a raw diet to their dogs.

    I, personally, do not feed raw due, and thus my dogs get no chicken bones.  If they happen to grab one, I remove it from them.

    1. afriqnet profile image52
      afriqnetposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Have your dog ever eaten the bones accidentally ? What happened?

    2. agilitymach profile image97
      agilitymachposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Only a few times. I think the issue isn't that dogs or times have changed. It's that it is a rare occurrence. But if your dog is the one in 10,000 to get hurt, then it's a big deal. Better safe than sorry.

    3. Mazzy Bolero profile image78
      Mazzy Boleroposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      My friend's little dog ate some chicken bones and had to have surgery to save her life.

  5. Justin Muir profile image95
    Justin Muirposted 6 years ago

    Back in my parent's native home of Jamaica; dogs eat the bones, skin, etc of any edible thing they see.  And it never seemed to hurt them much.  However, dogs on that island seem to be of a much rougher breed on average.  Our vet warns us time and time again to monitor what our Cavalier King Charles eats (i.e. no bones as the bone shards can damage the lning of the stomach and other internal things).  Maybe it depends on the breed?

    1. afriqnet profile image52
      afriqnetposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I also observed that when growing up with dogs that were mixed breeds. They chewed all the chicken bones and they never got a problem. So I also think its all about the breeds

    2. agilitymach profile image97
      agilitymachposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      It isn't about the breed as the anatomy of dogs is all the same. It is about percentage of risk, though. Most will be fine, but a small percentage will not.  Better safe than sorry!

  6. profile image0
    JThomp42posted 6 years ago

    Absolutely not. They can splinter in their throats and cause the dog severe harm.

  7. toknowinfo profile image88
    toknowinfoposted 6 years ago

    Chicken bones are actually quite dangerous for dogs, no matter what size the dog. The chicken bones can splinter easily and make tears all the way down the digestive tract of your dog. It is much better to give your dog the thick marrow bones from meat. Always take the cautious route and stay away from the chicken and turkey bones for sure!

    1. afriqnet profile image52
      afriqnetposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Sometimes staying away from the chicken bones seems the safest way  out here but if they ate the bone accidentally would you take this as an emergency case?

    2. toknowinfo profile image88
      toknowinfoposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I would watch my pet cautiously to make sure they have no adverse effects from eating the bones. I would not treat it as an emergency, unless there is severe rectal bleeding or it appears something is wrong.  The bone could pass through harmlessly.

  8. Brett Winn profile image88
    Brett Winnposted 6 years ago

    My dogs do eat chicken bones, but probably not in the way you're thinking. I have let them eat chicken carcasses (minus any "long" bones from legs/thighs) without problems. I also will let them eat the long bones, but only when I hold them tightly in my hand, let them gnaw off first one cartilage end, then the other, then 1/2 inch sections of the bone itself. I also save my carcasses and long bones in the freezer, and when I have a bunch, I cook them down with water in a pressure cooker until they are mushy, and thus render them into my equivalent of canned food, something I can add to kibble for flavor.

    1. afriqnet profile image52
      afriqnetposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I think your way of feeding them with the chicken bones while strictly supervising makes the chicken bones safe. Otherwise do you think they would be safe if they ate them accidentally since they are already used to eating chicken bones?

    2. OTEE profile image66
      OTEEposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, it's the long bones that one has to worry about. As long as they are supervised there should be no problem.

    3. Brett Winn profile image88
      Brett Winnposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      @afriqnet ... while dogs at times eat cooked chicken bones without problems, they still might one day have a problem. I personally would not risk it. For a period of time I fed my dogs only raw food, I still avoided thigh and drumstick bones.

  9. habee profile image93
    habeeposted 6 years ago

    No, we never give our dogs chicken bones or any type of bones. The Great Danes can munch right through ANY type of bone, and it makes them sick for a couple of days. When I was a kid, many people fed their dogs chicken bones. We had a fox terrier and a Chihuahua at the time, and eating chicken bones never bothered them at all. Both lived 17, 18 years. Still, better safe than sorry. Chicken bones splinter and can cause serious problems.

    1. afriqnet profile image52
      afriqnetposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I also remember my childhood dogs two of them used to eat chicken bones without a problem. Possibly times have change smile

  10. Joan King profile image71
    Joan Kingposted 6 years ago

    Both my dogs eat chicken bones and never had a problem. But then again, one of them also eats live birds, squirrels, wasps and who knows what else. She is a back yard hunter by nature and there is no stopping her, so why mess with nature.

    1. Shaddie profile image84
      Shaddieposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      It's cool that you let your dog free in the wild to decimate native wildlife populations and ingest legions of parasites that you probably had no idea even existed.

  11. 34th Bomb Group profile image60
    34th Bomb Groupposted 6 years ago

    NO!!
    They can kill them!! They can splinter and shred their innards. One must always be careful in disposing of poultry bones.

  12. Diana Lee profile image83
    Diana Leeposted 6 years ago

    No, I do not let my dogs have chicken bones. I lost a dog a few years ago because of eating a baked chicken drumstick. It damaged his stomach. I blamed myself for letting him have the bone. Baked bones are the worse as they splinter easily. Pork bones are nearly as bad and often have sharp edges. Raw bones are safer, but I haven't taken a chance to give them any chicken bones, raw or cooked.

    1. agilitymach profile image97
      agilitymachposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I'm so sorry about your dog, Diana Lee.  Do not blame yourself.  As you can see here, most people do, unfortunately, give cooked chicken bones. You didn't know it was that dangerous. Thanks for dropping in to educate others.

  13. OTEE profile image66
    OTEEposted 6 years ago

    I've heard that chicken bones are dangerous. It's the long bones that one has to be wary of -  as they are likely to splinter lengthwise and get stuck in the throat or other parts of the alimentary canal. I've routinely fed my Cocker spaniels chicken bones with no ill effects.

    I've heard of a German Shepherd that died due to a bone getting stuck in his throat. Perhaps it has to do with how the dogs eat the bones. Those that gobble food without chewing are likely to ingest splintered bones and are at a higher risk.

  14. nanderson500 profile image87
    nanderson500posted 6 years ago

    My dog has never eaten a chicken bone, at least not since I adopted him last year. He is tiny so it would probably be too big for him anyway.

  15. SherryDigital profile image60
    SherryDigitalposted 6 years ago

    Funny you ask this. I just came home and my 7 pound dachshund had raided the garbage, consuming all the chicken bones I threw out earlier. She is now happily sleeping on the sofa with a stuffed belly. Hopefully she will be okay. I'm not too worried, this is a pretty common theme with her.

    Somehow she always seems to be picking up chicken bones. Perhaps it is regular practice for people to throw their chicken bones wherever they like, but at least once a month while taking her on a walk, I will look down to see a little pup with a dirty bone in her mouth.

    1. afriqnet profile image52
      afriqnetposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Yeah, that is possibly what I observed when I was growing up

 
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