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jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (8 posts)

Why would a cat's stomach get very hard?

  1. MomsTreasureChest profile image88
    MomsTreasureChestposted 5 years ago

    Why would a cat's stomach get very hard?

    Why would a cat's stomach get very hard?  She has been drinking a lot of milk lately, could that have anything to do with it?

  2. profile image0
    Garifaliaposted 5 years ago

    Maybe the cat needs to eat weeds to get its intestine going. Cats and dogs also eat certain greens for their intestine. Follow her bowel movements and if she's not doing her no.2s then that's the problem. In any case a visit to the Vet if you suspect something's seriously wron, is a good move. Good luck. (I love cats--had 3 in the past).

  3. Lisa HW profile image72
    Lisa HWposted 5 years ago

    There could be any number of causes, so I don't really think anyone's guessing about any of that would be a good idea.

    I do know one thing, though, and that's the if a cat is "irregular" it may help to take him/her off dry food for awhile if that's what they eat.   A search will show you that constipation could be one cause.   I also know (from the long-haired cat that my son had) that long-haired cats can, for some reason, have a little more trouble with remaining sufficiently hydrated (which then can contribute to irregularity).  One vet, in one online article, said that in years of being a vet she had only seen two cases of constipation in cats that ate a canned or home-made diet.  (Jean Hofve, DVM).

    Cats are known to be more prone to having trouble digesting milk, so bloating can be one of the results.  Some cats do better with milk than others.  Expectant-mother cats' abdomens can feel hard, but there are a lot of medical conditions that can cause it too.  Hairballs and bones can cause obstructions, so waiting too long to see a vet isn't good (and I imagine you already know that anyway).

  4. shadegrown profile image60
    shadegrownposted 5 years ago

    As Lisa said, their could be a lot of causes. It may be normal but it may also means that your cat is bloated,  which means that it has a gas, fluid or foam excess. Eating weeds helps avoiding this kind of situations, but since its a bit too late to avoid it: Call your vet as soon as possible. Cats are known to be more sensitive to stomach and intestinal troubles, better see a vet so you can have a more appropriate solution.

  5. DubstepMaker profile image61
    DubstepMakerposted 5 years ago

    you shouldn't feed a cat too much milk! it's not good for their system. they aren't humans.... maybe a bit of milk once in a while for a treat (like once a week, or maybe just a spoonful of milk once every few days as a treat).

  6. Maggie Bonham profile image93
    Maggie Bonhamposted 3 years ago

    Your cat may be suffering from a condition known as megacolon.  It is something that can be life threatening.  As someone who owned a kitty with megacolon, I recognize the symptoms.   Please take your cat to the veterinarian and have her checked out.

  7. profile image59
    Monkey2708posted 16 months ago

    A number one cause would be constipation. 
    I have seen this a few times in my years of rescuing. One cat that I had went to the vet every other day to be extracted because he couldn't go on his own. Luckily he grew out of this as he aged.
    Another kitten that I recently rescued had the same problem. I was able to help him go potty since he was so tiny.
    It coul be the food that they are eating or an intestinal problem. It is best to take the cat to the vet and have them do an exam on him.
    They can actually die from impaction.

  8. ryan-cd profile image69
    ryan-cdposted 15 months ago

    I was going to recommend you take your cat to the Vet but as this was 4 years ago, I assume you already have, and so i was wondering how your cat is now? are they back to being happy and healthy?

 
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