Would you ever complain to your neighbour about their pets?

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  1. sangre profile image96
    sangreposted 6 years ago

    Would you ever complain to your neighbour about their pets?

    If your neighbours starved cat who was meowing outside for 2 days came into your kitchen and started eating your pets food what would you do.

  2. CWanamaker profile image97
    CWanamakerposted 6 years ago

    I would probably just call Animal Control and let them handle it.  After all they are the professionals right?

  3. BLACKANDGOLDJACK profile image83
    BLACKANDGOLDJACKposted 6 years ago

    So did you let this cat into your house? I have a cat. Actually it's my teenage daughter's cat, but I'm the one who gets to feed it and change the litter box. So I have cat food and I've fed cats in the neighborhood that are hungry. I don't let them into the house though.I don't particularly mind cats wandering around because I've never seen a rat or mouse in the neighborhood. I like rats a lot less than hungry cats. Now me, I would say something to the neighbor if it keeps happening and I know who owns the cat.

    Now, if it was a dog doing his business in my yard, I definitely would complain, and rather loudly.

    1. sangre profile image96
      sangreposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      @BLACKANDGOLDJACK. It actually snuck in the window. We fed her, she just look so depressed.  But we went down to their garden and put food in the cats bowl. Don't mind when it's one off, but she was at the door again this morning meowing for more.

  4. Annsalo profile image86
    Annsaloposted 6 years ago

    First of all does the cat look starved, or are you assuming it is because you heard a lot of meowing? I have to strays that started staying here that meow even if you fed them 20 minutes ago. They also leave the yard in search of other food. Did the cat come in a dog door or something? If the cat is showing no real signs of being starved just let the neighbor know it keeps trying to come in. Personally I wouldn't mind it coming around and would prevent it from coming inside.

    1. sangre profile image96
      sangreposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      @ Annsalo, she snuck in the window. It goggle up the food so I think she just missed a meal or two.  We actually saw the teenage daughter later, I know the mom&dad were gone so I think she was just too lazy to feed the pet for the two days.

  5. lburmaster profile image84
    lburmasterposted 6 years ago

    About the noise, probably so. And definately if their irritating cat did that! Keep their pets in their home or get rid of them.

  6. grumpiornot profile image83
    grumpiornotposted 6 years ago

    Absolutely I would talk to them about their pets... and I would expect them to do the same. If pets are unhappy, including mine (they might be lonely while I'm at work and need a companion or more toys, or whatever) then that should be brought to the attention of their owners in a civilized and reasonable way.

  7. Lisa HW profile image63
    Lisa HWposted 6 years ago

    I wouldn't complain.  I probably wouldn't let the cat into my house, though.  I'd probably give him some food outside.  Lots of times, neighborhood cats are well loved and cared for, but their "people" don't get home in time for their need need for food.  Sometimes, though, people just don't take good care of their own cats.  Either way, I wouldn't complain to the people because if it just happened their cat was hungry before they got home I don't see it as a big deal to give the cat a little snack.  If he's outside he's eating a lot worse than that, so eating what they don't know about isn't really an issue.  If they were people who didn't take good care of their cat (or couldn't for some reason), I'd just see it as "decent" to feed the hungry cat.  Of course, some people wouldn't feed it no matter what, and they'd say that the cat will stop showing up if he doesn't get food.  That's true too (much of the time, anyway).

    To be honest, I'd worry that if I complained about the cat to neighbors who didn't feed him for two days that they may get fed up with having trouble with neighbors and send the cat away.  Then, too, if it's a Tom Cat and the neighbor cats with the food are girl cats, he may prefer to hang out with the neighbor-lady cats; and his owners may not even know where he is (or be able to do much about it other than have him neutered, provided they can afford it).

    BUT, I'm someone with two neighbor-cats that I love (and who are well cared for as far as I can see).  I give them occasional treats.  They're my faithful buddies who meet me, or my guests, when we pull up out front. They seem hungrier on Saturday night than other nights.  All in all, they're the best of all pet-worlds - the loyal friends and enthusiastic, affectionate, greeters without the vomit- and litter-box clean-up.  As you can see, maybe I shouldn't have tried to come up with a good answer here.  I love a good cat-friend (or two) and am happy to feed any of them.   smile   Even with that, though, I still don't let either my cat-buddies into the house.  I suppose if it were super cold out I might do that, though.

    Something else is that cats that are stressed out or have a medical condition can have fierce appetites that go way beyond what seems reasonable, so the people may not even realize that whatever they're feeding their cat isn't enough for his appetite.   hmm  Then, too, there's "complaining" and there's "mentioning as if it isn't all that big of a problem"....       hmm

 
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