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My cat got sprayed by a skunk! Someone help me figure out how to make him stop s

  1. Kathleen Odenthal profile image94
    Kathleen Odenthalposted 3 years ago

    My cat got sprayed by a skunk! Someone help me figure out how to make him stop smelling. Ideas?

  2. Cheeky Kid profile image97
    Cheeky Kidposted 3 years ago

    I've got no experience with skunk stink bombs but maybe you should give your cat a bath with lots of soap and shampoo. Good luck. :3

  3. IndependentMind profile image76
    IndependentMindposted 3 years ago

    They say you can neutralize the scent of skunk with tomato juice.  A tomato juice bath would not hurt your cat.  But my best suggestion would be to consult with your veterinarian.

  4. Melissa A Smith profile image99
    Melissa A Smithposted 3 years ago

    Cats don't like baths so you're in a tough predicament. This is one reason why cats should remain indoors unless supervised. Nature's Miracle makes a product that removes skunk spray sold in most pet stores.

    1. IndependentMind profile image76
      IndependentMindposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      That's funny.  I had a couple of cats that loved taking a bath and would jump into the tub with who ever was taking a bath.  It led to some comical situations, i must say.

    2. Kathleen Odenthal profile image94
      Kathleen Odenthalposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I have one cat that loves the pool, and two cats that fear water, one to such an extent its remarkable. The one who got sprayed is the middle of the extremes, hes just skiddish. Luckily the smell has mostly disapated.

    3. profile image53
      acornivposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      A very few breeds (like Turkish Van's) love water, as do some individuals ( I have one) I have a theory that cats are either wharf descended ( fish lovers) or dairy descended (they  love dairy) My fish lovers are much more inclined to play in water.

  5. peeples profile image95
    peeplesposted 3 years ago

    I use to have an old stray we adopted who bolted every time I opened our door, and one night she returned home with that awful smell! Since giving her a bath was nearly impossible we just slathered tomato juice all over the while she was on the porch. It took 2 of us to hold her in position. We left it on while she ran around for a while. About an hour or so later we lured her back to us (she hated us by this point) with some tuna. My husband held her down and I poured two giant pitchers of warm vinegar/lemon/water on her, massaging her in between pitchers. It did get rid of most of the odor but not all.

  6. bethperry profile image91
    bethperryposted 3 years ago

    A friend had a dog sprayed by a skunk. Her vet told her to add a little vinegar to the dog's water in order for the rank smell to pass more quickly.. I think it was one tablespoon vinegar to 12 ounces of water. You might want to try this as the friend said it helped.

    1. Kathleen Odenthal profile image94
      Kathleen Odenthalposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Wow! I never would have thought of that!

  7. The Examiner-1 profile image75
    The Examiner-1posted 3 years ago

    The well-known one is bath in tomato juice - but that is a maybe.

    Another one which seems to work better is:
    1 quart 3 percent hydrogen peroxide
    1/4 cup baking soda (sodium bicarbonate)
    1 teaspoon liquid soap or dish detergent
    Mix these together and bathe ("shampoo" in or rub down) the spray victim thoroughly.
    Be sure to use this mixture immediately after it is created, as it is unstable.
    Let sit for five minutes and rinse with tap water afterward, and repeat if necessary.
    For spray in the eyes, flush with water as soon as possible.

    1. profile image53
      acornivposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Because cats take in toxins thorugh their skin more readily than humans or most other animals, I would caution against using these substances. They could make your cat very sick!

    2. The Examiner-1 profile image75
      The Examiner-1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      The only one that I can see with toxins is hydro peroxide. Baking soda is used in food and dish soap washes dishes.

    3. profile image53
      acornivposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      From several pet websites: "Ingestion of large amounts of baking soda or baking powder can lead to electrolyte abnormalities (low potassium, low calcium and/or high sodium), congestive heart failure or muscle spasms." kidney failure is also a concern

    4. The Examiner-1 profile image75
      The Examiner-1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I did not know that, I do not have a pet. Well then, the simple tomato juice that I said first is the other option - unless that has toxins for cats(?)

    5. profile image53
      acornivposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      No worries - actually it is good you & others brought this up, so it can be corrected - I wrote 1800petmeds and asked them to do so. Thanks!

  8. bravewarrior profile image93
    bravewarriorposted 3 years ago

    Kathleen, I found this article on 1800PetMeds:

    http://www.1800petmeds.com/education/re … pets-9.htm

    1. profile image53
      acornivposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I like 1800petmeds. I use them, but this advice is neither sound nor safe, especially with a cat with compromised kidneys or a heart condition. Sodium sets off an electrolyte imbalance and  HP (bleach) is used to induce vomiting after poisoning
      .

  9. profile image53
    acornivposted 3 years ago

    You rub him down with tomato juice. No joke. It nutralizes the odor. People who live in skunky areas keep it on hand, especially if they have dogs.

    There are ways to give cats baths that are less frightening than others. In this case, because you're not trying to get rid of fleas etc, I would get a capable assistant or put a harness (NOT collar - bad idea if he panics) and leash on him and secure the leash to a towel rack or something else that will keep him in the bathtub long enough for you to rub him down with tomato juice, let sit a few minutes and then pour cups of warm (not too warm) water on him, while reassuring him and follow it up with treats or his favorite play. The key is to avoid the sound of rushing water - hence using a cup to scoop and pour rather than running water. Putting them into a tub of water is terrifying and I don't recommend it. Cats vary widely in how they react to water. I have one who gets in the shower every day, and spends the rest of his day sleeping in the sink, fishing in a bowl of water or flushing the toilet, but if I were to set him in a tub of water he'd likely react like a more, ummm, normal cat.

 
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