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There seem to be some people who CAN find jobs even in these

  1. gmwilliams profile image82
    gmwilliamsposted 4 years ago

    http://s4.hubimg.com/u/8029319_f248.jpg
    precarious times. They are inundated with jobs. They seem to have the Midas touch in terms of jobs and socioeconomic opportunities. These are the people who have LITTLE or NO PROBLEMS with getting and keeping good jobs. They are also the entrepeneurs among us. They WON'T starve-in fact, quite the opposite happens, they are usually ON TOP or NEAR THE TOP of the world.

    Then there are others who have MAJOR PROBLEMS regarding being unemployed. In fact, they could be called unemployable although they have the right credentials. They never seem to be reasonably employed if they are employed.  They are either unemployed or underemployed. In other words, they are damned as far as job/employment opportunities go.  If they happen to be employed, they are in a state of constant and continual struggle..............they NEVER seem to get AN EVEN BREAK. They are on the ourside, looking in.....
    http://s4.hubimg.com/u/8029323_f248.jpg

    Some people are doing things RIGHT while others just DON'T get it at all!

    1. profile image55
      Lie Detectorposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      The easiest thing in the world is keeping a job, just remember you are not entitled to it and employers actually expect you to work.

  2. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 4 years ago

    And some people are in circumstances that make finding a job harder, like being disabled, needing to stay in the same area as their children, having a past conviction etc.  It is not just a case of those who try versus those who don't.

    1. profile image55
      Lie Detectorposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Having a past conviction is not a circumstance that was beyond their control.

  3. profile image0
    Beth37posted 4 years ago

    I worked in admin most of my career. I was the president of a non profit, and owned my own business... I could NOT find a job. I applied for what felt like hundreds of jobs back in '09 and couldn't get hired anywhere. Finally, I decided to apply for a job that seemed like a last straw for me... a grocery store. They hired me. It took me 2 years, but I was earning a paycheck. What was funny was it ended up being one of the most challenging and fun jobs Ive ever had. I loved the friendships, the relationships were complicated and there was always something new to learn. Way more difficult than I could have imagined. I don't make much money, but I work very hard and am successful in other ways. I hope the market has improved in the past couple of years. Id hate for others to still be going thru that.

    1. Zelkiiro profile image85
      Zelkiiroposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Isn't it a little eerie how the most difficult jobs (construction, retail, maintenance) are the lowest-paying...?

      1. profile image0
        Beth37posted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Ive never worked harder than I have now. It is funny, you're right. The more you sit, the more you get paid. Yet my mind is WAY more challenged in this position. There's a 1000 codes, policies, rules, glitches, all while ppl are breathing down your neck from customer to manager. I fully understand why ppl go postal now. lol

      2. gmwilliams profile image82
        gmwilliamsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Such jobs do not require a lot of skill sets.  These jobs are low skills.  Low skilled jobs usually paid THE LEAST.  The so called sit down jobs you talk about require a higher skill level. Managers required a high skill level either through education or experience.  Maintenance jobs do not require much brains nor does retail jobs.  These jobs do not require a high educational level to do them.  A 5th grade educated person is qualified to do such jobs.

        If one wants to be paid well, he/she must obtain a high level of education, develop specific skill sets, have a talent/giftedness, and/or develop a brand.  Otherwise, he/she will be a Joe/Josephina Schmo working at a lower end job, being the working poor, overused, disrespected, anonymous, and unappreciated.  Yes, a NOBODY.

        1. Zelkiiro profile image85
          Zelkiiroposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          So learning how to run Microsoft Excel and sit in a chair screwing around for 8 hours justifies making twice as much as someone who literally breaks their body every day digging trenches and hauling material?

          Makes perfect sense.

        2. profile image0
          Beth37posted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I wonder if you believe that or if you are only playing devils advocate.

          I used to stay up till 3 am nights waiting for my husband to finish his college papers so that I (the one without the education) could edit them for him. I read a lot, always have. I never liked structure so I chose to raise children and teach them the importance of a college education (I have 2 in college now), but didn't go myself. That didn't keep me from doing the three things I loved most, writing, music and being a mom. Honestly, those were the only things I was interested in.

          You are correct... with most of what you said. Although I would beg to differ that those without a college degree are nobodies... and that they do not matter. Try making it from day to day in this world without those ppl. I wish you luck.

          1. gmwilliams profile image82
            gmwilliamsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            That is what society considers those who have low skills and little education.  Society also considers those with high education with low skilled Mcjobs the same.  If one has little education and has a high powered positions such as entertainers and some entrepeneurs, he/she is a SOMEBODY.  Those with the combination of high education, high skills, and a high powered job are THE ONES who are highly respected and revered-they are THE TRUE SOMEBODIES.  If you do not believe me, there is a book ALL RISE by Robert W. Fuller discussing how society perceives powerful and powerless people.

        3. profile image55
          Lie Detectorposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I have been in management most of my life and the best managers were the ones who started at the bottom and worked their way up. Too many college educated buffoons come in thinking they have a clue and are usually the first to go.

        4. profile image0
          Motown2Chitownposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I might beg to differ.  There are a couple of folks I can think of who are anything but nobodies and they don't have that highly coveted college degree of which you speak.  Well, they may now, but they dropped out of college first.

          You know, people like Mark Zuckerberg and Steve Jobs.

          I'm sure there are a lot of folks out there who don't have a fancy, schmancy college degree and are doing just fine.

      3. profile image55
        Lie Detectorposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I have worked in all three and I would have to say that being a brain surgeon is probably a little more challenging than replacing a wax ring.

  4. brakel2 profile image84
    brakel2posted 4 years ago via iphone

    Everybody is useful. There are people without college degrees who make lots of money. They have worked hard to get where they are. Some jobs requiring college don't pay very well. You can't make general statements about people. They aren't all in a box. Each one has his own abilities and problems and unique personalities.

  5. brakel2 profile image84
    brakel2posted 4 years ago via iphone

    Everybody is useful. There are people without college degrees who make lots of money. They have worked hard to get where they are. Some jobs requiring college don't pay very well. You can't make general statements about people. They aren't all in a box. Each one has his own abilities and problems and unique personalities.

    1. gmwilliams profile image82
      gmwilliamsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Well said  Beth and Brakel2.  I would like to add that it is sad that artists and other creative types are underrated and disparaged in this society.  Artists and other creative people such as writers and dancers are underpaid unless they are famous. They are not valued in comparison to those with more technical, mathematical, and business skills.

 
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