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jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (12 posts)

What does it mean if someone say your overdress at a job interview?

  1. chanroth profile image72
    chanrothposted 6 years ago

    Is casual dressing makes you over dressing yourself in a job interview. I had another job interview just this morning and was told that I was over dress. I was wearing a collar shirt, slacks, and heals...hair down and earring...no necklace or bracelet but my engagement ring...make up...not too much...how am I overdressing? I was following what was told by my career adviser. What is your best suggestion for a young lady like me or people in any certain age wear for a job interview? I was told by my friend that I dress like an old lady in suit looking for work...that was hurtful...I think I need a make over....I don't know....

    1. profile image0
      Wilfionposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      It depends what sort of work you are applying for.  If it is office work, or any professional position, then a suit seems the right choice.  Conservative, smart dress is always expected at such an interview.

    2. Eaglekiwi profile image79
      Eaglekiwiposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Sounds acceptable enough to me,but it helps (if you are able to check before hand) observe the dress code of current staff.

      Another good rule of thumb is to always dress one level up from the job yer applying for.

      Even if its say (for guy) applying for a factory job, clean casual atttire would be acceptable.

      Good luck! smile

    3. couturepopcafe profile image61
      couturepopcafeposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      My question is who told you that you were overdressed?  Consider the source of the comment.  Obviously this was not an expert.  From everything you've said, your outfit sounded perfect.  I might suggest double checking your heel height and earring length.  Heel - medium to low.  Earrings - no long dangles, no more that 1' long for the office.  If you have long hair, pull it back.  Anything that screams fashion is not accepted in office attire unless you are applying for work in an office that's in the fashion industry or design industry.  Or if it's an ultra modern company where they allow employees to work 'outside the box'.  Those are few and far between and are usually in the areas of design, architecture, softwear, or entertainment.

  2. profile image0
    Arlene V. Pomaposted 6 years ago

    You really can't miss with a nice suit.  Since you didn't mention what kind of a job you were after, a nice suit, lower heels, jewelry that doesn't scream, and subtle makeup are good choices.  You were going after that, weren't you?  Take the time to observe what people wear, but you also have to concentrate on selling yourself to what could be your future employer.  I would also ignore your friend who says hurtful things about the way you dress.  This is very cruel of her.  She should be supporting you in today's horrible job market.

  3. chanroth profile image72
    chanrothposted 6 years ago

    I was in for an administrative assistant...that why I was asking...temporary position...

  4. chanroth profile image72
    chanrothposted 6 years ago

    I'm not a jewelry person...every time I wear my earrings, necklace or bracelet its in a way for some reason...one ring is fine but more than one I can't stand it...I wear low heels...slacks..a collar shirt...just casual look and people that was with me in the interview...they had a nice shirt with a little showing of their cleavage, short skirts...flats shoes...curled hair...few jewelries and good profession make up...the other girl was with jeans and a tank top with hoodie sweater...and tennis shoes. lol

  5. chanroth profile image72
    chanrothposted 6 years ago

    I'm not a jewelry person...every time I wear my earrings, necklace or bracelet its in a way for some reason...one ring is fine but more than one I can't stand it...I wear low heels...slacks..a collar shirt...just casual look and people that was with me in the interview...they had a nice shirt with a little showing of their cleavage, short skirts...flats shoes...curled hair...few jewelries and good profession make up...the other girl was with jeans and a tank top with hoodie sweater...and tennis shoes. lol

  6. PeterinCanada profile image54
    PeterinCanadaposted 6 years ago

    Yes I agree that it depends on the job you are applying.Avoid miniskirts, tight sweaters, sloppy overalls and sandals with straps.

    1. Tusitala Tom profile image66
      Tusitala Tomposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      The same advice I would give to a speaker who plans to address an audience, I give to the job seeker.   Anticipate - better, find out for certain - the type of attitude the people who will be interviwing you are likeliy to have given the job you're going for.   You want an office job in a bank or insurance:  turn up with a conservative business suit.   You want a job as a long-distance trucker: turn up in jeans, boots, and a leather jacket.
      Dress the way you expect the employees doing the type of job you want would, in all probabilty dress.

      You over-dress if you wear your very best outfit and want a job as a casual waitress.     Always look clean and tidy, of course.   And one thing it's helpful to wear, if you can:  a smile.

      In a nutshell - use you common sense.

  7. davenmidtown profile image88
    davenmidtownposted 6 years ago

    Chanroth:  it would be helpful if you shared with us what kind of job you were interviewing for.  I would also say that it is better to overdress then underdress.  I also agree with Tom... do a little homework if possible to see how other people are dressed.  You can visit the business to see what it is like.  Another good idea is to ask what the dress code would be when you set up your interview.   ds

  8. ftclick profile image55
    ftclickposted 6 years ago

    It happens quite a bit for business financial people going to interview for tech or internet media companeis

 
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