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Bring back the contests!

  1. Austinstar profile image83
    Austinstarposted 4 years ago

    We had three or four HP contests last year. This year, I don't think there has been one yet. I know one was cancelled.
    The contests challenged me to write. Therefore I say, bring them back!

    1. Robin profile image
      95
      Robinposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Hi, Austinstar!  I'm sorry about the delay.  We are all so focused at HP Headquarters right now on quality that we just don't have the bandwidth to run the contest.  sad  We will let you know as soon as we do.  Thanks for your patience.  smile

    2. marieryan profile image81
      marieryanposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I agree with ' Austinstar' . I personally would prefer to have contests as I am very badly disciplined in my writing.  I'm sure it would help me keep focused. Winning wouldn't be an option for me so I don't have the stress of losing that I can hear in some commenters. (Although I won't experience the joy of winning either.) Even though I enjoy writing the hubs when I do them, I put off getting started on the next one.
      Although I joined a few years ago, I am only starting to write recently.  I keep looking for contests just because I think it would help me manage my time better.

      1. kenneth avery profile image78
        kenneth averyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I'm humbled by your statement. You said what I wanted to say, but didnt have the nerve.

  2. kenneth avery profile image78
    kenneth averyposted 4 years ago

    Great idea. For elite hubbers. Not me. I entered every contest that had a name from recipes to fixing up my older hubs and DID NOT GET ONE WORD OF APPRECIATION or anything from HubPages or anyone.
    Case in point. Although (and I hope Christy or Matt at HubPages are reading this), I crossed my t's and dotted my I's, nothing.
    So you can understand why I couldn't care less either way.

    1. Sherry Hewins profile image94
      Sherry Hewinsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Did you get any good hubs out of writing for contests? My best performing hub is one I did for a weekly topic inspiration. It is a subject I would never have thought of writing about were it not for that challenge. I think of contests in the same way. Even if I don't win, I have a new hub, which I hope I am proud of.

  3. Austinstar profile image83
    Austinstarposted 4 years ago

    @kenneth - so just trying to win a contest does not inspire you? There are tons of entries, we can't all win. Or do you prefer the contests where everyone gets a ribbon? (sigh)

    1. kenneth avery profile image78
      kenneth averyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Hi, Austinstar,
      No, not  a ribbon, but in all of the contests, and there were lots that I entered, I lost and no one likes losing all of the time.

      1. agilitymach profile image98
        agilitymachposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I've been in contests where there were "participation" ribbons handed out.  They mean nothing.  In all contests, the idea is to better yourself.  If you are losing, think about it and better your writing/layout/topic etc.  The only way failure is truly failure is if you refuse to learn from it. big_smile

    2. kenneth avery profile image78
      kenneth averyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Austin, I've been a "gung ho" Hubs member for almost four years and in that time, if they had a contest, I entered it. And speaking of consistency, in all of the over-400 hubs I've written, not one has EVER made it to their HubPages Weekly.
      Now some of my followers have made it there to be interviewed about things they did, but me and a whole lot more (I've found out) hubbers have just worn-out our keyboards and for what?
      Yes, agility, I try to do my best, but I have reached my mental, emotional, and creative limits.
      After all, (wish HP knew this), I am not a heartless machine, but only a mortal.

  4. Austinstar profile image83
    Austinstarposted 4 years ago

    I feel your pain. Not even getting an honorable mention is painful. But, so is running a marathon. Nothing comes easy. The best we can do is try and try again.

    1. kenneth avery profile image78
      kenneth averyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Yes, Austin, you are right on both posts. I "have" learned, and will continue to learn, but like I said, "when I crossed all of my t's, dotted all of my i's, and still nothing after about three and a half year's worth of contests, sure it's painful.
      Am I a better person? Honestly, and brutally, not that I can tell.

    2. WriteAngled profile image91
      WriteAngledposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I disagree.

      Running a marathon is a personal challenge that does not need to relate to anything done by anyone else. Completing a marathon is a prize in itself, regardless of the finishing time.

      HP competitions are built on the premise of some people climbing to the top over the backs of others. Those left at the bottom of the heap gain nothing whatsoever from the experience.

      1. agilitymach profile image98
        agilitymachposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        As a sports coach and competitor in a sport where failure is the norm and winning the exception, I have learned the importance of the mental game in competition and the importance of personal improvement in competition.  Competition for winning alone is hollow.

        Learning the IMPORTANCE of failure in personal growth is a huge part of self improvement.  I don't intentionally "fail" to learn from it, but I totally and completely embrace failure.  I have gotten to the highest levels of my sport through failure...not through success.  As NBA superstar Kevin Durant has said, it's in failure where I have found my success.

        The same can be said of writing, and in fact, I read it here all of the time.  The most successful hubbers will say they "learned what works and what doesn'tt from their mistakes."

        Attempting ANY kind of competition with the expectation that there are only winners and losers will result in a sense of failure as most people will be in the "losers" category.  Such a person will not learn to embrace failure, will not learn from the failure and in the end, will be a failure. It does not have to be a marathon.  It can be anything from the local science fair to the Olympics.

        I have several articles here on Hubpages that deals with the mental aspect of winning and losing and how to be great at both.  Although they relate directly to my sport, they also can be related to anything in life, as some of those commenting on those hubs have pointed out.  You might want to read "Goals vs. Dreams: How to Set Goals for Agility and Other Canine Sports" and "Are Handlers with Competitive Attitudes Good for the Sport of Dog Agility."  These two articles have MUCH that translates to the real world.

        BTW, these concepts are the foundation for any sports or competition psychology. smile  I'm not spouting things that I, alone, believe.  Go to a good sports psychologist, and you'll get the same information.

      2. Austinstar profile image83
        Austinstarposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Sorry, but I think you have got that wrong. Writers are constantly running a marathon. Not necessarily for personal gain. Runners run and writers write. We are not trying to do it on the "backs of others".

  5. WriteAngled profile image91
    WriteAngledposted 4 years ago

    The one and only hub I produced for a WTI is my worst performing hub of all time.

    I put hours of research plus the fruits of decades of education and work experience into it.

    1. Sherry Hewins profile image94
      Sherry Hewinsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I did some WTIs that got nothing too, but I have other hubs on topics I came up with on my own that got nothing too. That's just the nature of the game. Sometimes you work your ass off for nothing and sometimes you just throw something up quick and easy and it catches fire.

  6. WriteAngled profile image91
    WriteAngledposted 4 years ago

    The point is, though, that if I decide to tackle a marathon (which would be quite a feat given I am on week 2 of C25K and will turn 60 next year), the only thing that concerns me is whether I stick to the training to master the distance and then prove it by completing the event. I'm absolutely not interested in how I perform compared to anyone else. The only reason I would do it in an organised event would be to get the extra buzz of the crowd factor, plus some souvenir showing I had finished the course. So a "participation ribbon" would mean everything to me. It would be visible confirmation, which I could look at in days to come, that I had completed a challenge I set for myself.

    1. agilitymach profile image98
      agilitymachposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Precisely!!!!  And every competition should be viewed in the same aspect.  Not doing so will mean that if you fail, which will be likely in any competition with many competitors, you will truly FAIL.  You will not learn.  You will not grow.

      All competition should be entered into with the idea that it is a growth opportunity.  Again, read my hub "Are Competitors with Competitive Attitudes Good for the Sport of Agility," and you'll understand.

      All competition - indeed all life - is about the doing and the growing - not the winning.  To view it any other way is to be a loser when failure comes, which the chances are it surely will.

    2. Austinstar profile image83
      Austinstarposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      WriteAngled - The production of a hub is worthwhile. It's tangible and quite possibly interesting or helpful to someone other than yourself.
      Running a marathon produces nothing for others. It only benefits you.
      Your hub is its own "participation ribbon".

      1. agilitymach profile image98
        agilitymachposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        +1

      2. Sherry Hewins profile image94
        Sherry Hewinsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Exactly! If a contest inspires us to write hubs, we all win.

  7. janderson99 profile image84
    janderson99posted 4 years ago

    This one sounds riveting:

    "As far as officially-endorsed challenges go, you are much more likely to see ones that focus on creating 3-5 Stellar Hubs in 30 days in the future."

    http://hubpages.com/forum/topic/114110

  8. kenneth avery profile image78
    kenneth averyposted 4 years ago

    You are all correct in why we, or I, should enter contests, but here there are two schools of thought. One, sometimes an encouraging word goes further than a tangible "prize," and doesn't the law of averages say that you might throw 1,000 marbles at a thimble several feet from you, and maybe, two out of that 1,000 marbles will hit the thimble?
    I realize this within HubPages there are literally thousands of enlightened, endowed, and elite writers who just hit their keyboards and out come award-winning, and contest-winning hubs.
    So with that fact, I'm already two strikes against me each time I publish a hub. My hubs have to be twice as good (if possible) in order to get HubPages' attention.
    So you see why I don't really care for their contests.

    1. Austinstar profile image83
      Austinstarposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Kenneth, I see that your hub score is 76. This tells me that there is room for improvement. While I don't always notice a hub score (sometimes it's because you are new to HP), I do notice it if someone appears to deny they have an issue.
      Some of us have worked very hard to learn to write well. We don't just "throw marbles at a thimble". We read, study and practice. We edit and re-edit. We learn from our mistakes (yes, we do make them). Just hitting your keyboards doesn't cut it.
      To me, contests are a measure of what can be achieved. I want to be best at something. But, I do know that I may not be the best. It would come as a surprise if I actually won!
      The only time I did win was on a daily drawing which is no measure of my talent or lack thereof. That was just luck. But as they say, you can't win if you don't play!

      1. kenneth avery profile image78
        kenneth averyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Austin,
        I know my score is 76, and you can believe this or not, I was diagnosed in 2003 with Accelerated Fibromyalgia and Neurothopy, both are I curable.
        Now. Around four years ago, I joined HubPages, back before these diseases got worse. I have (too), studied, edited, as you say you do, and turned out sometimes three hubs a day.
        This is to say that although you might think, or Mark might think that I'm of low intelligence as he implied. That could be right. I don't claim to be a Rhodes scholar. I just enjoy writing.
        But as to not keep this topic in debate, I did enter HP's contests. And with each one, I made the mistake of getting my hopes up. We know where that went.
        Anyway, I say to HP bring back the contests for people who lime them.
        And the term I used, "hitting keyboards and out comes great hubs," was a compliment  mixed with a dash of envy at their talents, another thing I've never claimed to be.
        Next week I'm planning on doing three hubs. Sure, they won't be as good as yours and most on HP, but I'm not quitting. (Not quitting is used in honor of my favorite female on TruTV, Ashley Broad of Hardcore Pawn, Detroit, Michigan).

  9. psycheskinner profile image79
    psycheskinnerposted 4 years ago

    I doubt this thread would make Hubpages want to run any more contests.  Kinda the reverse.

    1. Sherry Hewins profile image94
      Sherry Hewinsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      If people don't like contests, I don't see why they just don't enter them. Why deny it to others who do want to participate? I've never won a contest either, but I'm not going to whine about it.

  10. Mark Ewbie profile image84
    Mark Ewbieposted 4 years ago

    Can I post my entry here?

    Marbles and thimbles is a great game to play because it is demanding and also simple so kids and adults of low educational ability can enjoy it.  When I was...

    That's only the start of it.  I don't want to give away the ending till the comp starts.

  11. LoisRyan13903 profile image77
    LoisRyan13903posted 4 years ago

    Just curious what types of contests were there?  When I wrote for another site the contest would consist of fifteen related articles.  For example I wrote articles on bowling and each of the articles had to deal with a specific title.  One title was called "Keeping score in bowling"  Another was "How to put the curve on bowling."  I did well in it but I didn't win.

    1. Sherry Hewins profile image94
      Sherry Hewinsposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I'm trying to remember... They were not so specific as the ones you mentioned. I think there was one where you were supposed to write about something you collect, there was the Rigorous review contest (you could write a review about anything).

  12. Austinstar profile image83
    Austinstarposted 4 years ago

    Being a good writer is very subjective. There are some rules to go by, but like any art - beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Some people love technical or police thrillers, some people love those god-awful romance stories.
    It isn't always about being a good writer. The reader either likes your words or doesn't and there is little one can do to improve it.
    @Kenneth A - thanks for the compliment! I love when people recognize my talent :-) But, I didn't mean to imply that you are a bad writer. Quite the contrary. I kowtow to the HP rules. Probably shouldn't, since I write for fun anyway, but that's just the way I roll. Mark Ewbie, on the other hand, throws the rule book out the window after setting it on fire. He's actually quite dangerous and deranged. But that's just my opinion. I still read his stick man hubs and anti-hp hubs. He's hilarious.
    Anyway, if we all follow kenneth, we may help his hub score! Let's do it....

    1. Mark Ewbie profile image84
      Mark Ewbieposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Er.. thanks!

    2. profile image0
      Beth37posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Once again Mark Ewbie leaves me in the dust. If only we could combine forces and make a romance story with stick figures. The best of both worlds.

      1. Mark Ewbie profile image84
        Mark Ewbieposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Please no.  I am a complete failure.  My writing is appalling, my income matches and my stick figures are getting worse.  Look at this for the sort of awful stuff I don't even dare put on HP...
        http://s4.hubimg.com/u/8180427_f248.jpg

        1. profile image0
          Beth37posted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Is that bug to scale?

          1. Mark Ewbie profile image84
            Mark Ewbieposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            I think it was bigger than that, but I didn't get much of a look at it.

            1. profile image0
              Beth37posted 4 years ago in reply to this

              I would imagine you would have to be extremely flexible.

              1. Mark Ewbie profile image84
                Mark Ewbieposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Let's not dwell on the ins and outs of it.  It could be a metaphor.

                1. profile image0
                  Beth37posted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  lol

  13. kenneth avery profile image78
    kenneth averyposted 4 years ago

    @ Audtinstar, Beth, and Mark . . . Great! I'd love to have mor followers. And thank you, Audtinstar, for your not saying I'm not a good writer. I'm more of a fearful, conservative essayist because I hate it when HubPages "flag" my stories and I have to email them to ask why-- for I cannot figure out their maze-like links to get help.
    I'd love to write like all three of you. And win one contest.
    That's all. I'm not a greedy-hearted man like "Mr. L.B. Newcombe, 77, of Witch Point, Tennessee who on every second Thursday of each month, climbs atop his favorite place, the top of his run-down frame house that sits . . .
    Enough.

    1. Mark Ewbie profile image84
      Mark Ewbieposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Oh I didn't mean to imply the low intelligence thing - I was just rambling.  The only part of it that had relevance was the marbles and thimbles.

      Every time I post I have to then apologize.  I can't figure it out.

      1. janderson99 profile image84
        janderson99posted 4 years ago in reply to this

        "a romance story with stick figures"
        Love yes! But can stick figures do it?

        1. Mark Ewbie profile image84
          Mark Ewbieposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Sadly they can.  It's as much as I can do to keep them apart.

        2. profile image0
          Beth37posted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Great, now I'm going to have to apologize.

      2. kenneth avery profile image78
        kenneth averyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        @ Mark, all is cool. I do the same thing.

  14. Austinstar profile image83
    Austinstarposted 4 years ago

    Wow Mark, I didn't even know one could post photos on the forums. Oh, they are in trouble now. Can we get a stick man throwing marbles at a thimble? That would be so cool....

    1. Mark Ewbie profile image84
      Mark Ewbieposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      http://s3.hubimg.com/u/8183766_f248.jpg

      1. kenneth avery profile image78
        kenneth averyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Mark . . .I LOVE THIS! I am now glad that I checked my messages. Oh, uh, which of the stick persons is me, the handsome one?

        1. agilitymach profile image98
          agilitymachposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          There's a handsome one?

          1. kenneth avery profile image78
            kenneth averyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Yeah. Me. Although I'm the only one who thinks so.

            1. kenneth avery profile image78
              kenneth averyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              @ Agility. . .look carefully at the stick person in the back, or the stick person second from your right, or first from your left--see the suave, smart, world-wise, David Niven look on his face? Mark did that for me. Thanks, Msrk, oll' chum. Care to join me in the drawing room for a spot of tea? And you can join us, Agility.

              1. agilitymach profile image98
                agilitymachposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Huh....  Do you mean the bald stick person?  Now, don't get me wrong, I know plenty of very handsome bald men, but in this particular stick person drawing, I think the stick person with hair would be the most handsome of the two - if you could even begin to call either handsome. wink  However, the bald one is smiling a bit vs. the frown of the haired one.  Still....

                I would love some tea.  I'll be there, and I'll bring the Mad Hatter.

                1. kenneth avery profile image78
                  kenneth averyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  @ agility, (blushing; face red), you're so nice. Thanks. Now I don't mind my baldness, it's my affliction of being directionally-challenged which means I can't  north, south, east, west without a compass and I fear that GPS devices are tools of "big brother," not the television show, watching me, so my new friend, could you email me a PDF of the location where we are to have tea . . .and could you bring some tea?

                  1. agilitymach profile image98
                    agilitymachposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    As for handsome bald men, there are many out there.  Patrick Stewart (Capt. Pickard of "Star Trek: NG") is one.  Yes, I'm a geek.  Vin Diesel and the Rock are also good looking bald men to be had - although not by me, of course.  There are plenty of others as well.  Hold your head up high.

                    As for where to have tea, I am an ashamedly A&W Diet Root Beer drinker.  I only drink hot tea about once a decade.  But my dog agility field with the big cottonwood for shade is always available if you don't mind some dog fur in your tea.

        2. Mark Ewbie profile image84
          Mark Ewbieposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Oh yeah... definitely.

  15. paradigmsearch profile image85
    paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago

    http://i.imgflip.com/2cbd6.jpg
    .
    Sorry, couldn't pass this one up. big_smile

    I am pro contests.

    1. Writer Fox profile image78
      Writer Foxposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      So who says there can't be a contest?  It doesn't have to be HubPages-approved; it can just be paradigmsearch-approved.  So long as it has an unbiased judge (not a popularity contest) and a cool prize (doesn't have to be money), you can run the contest right here on the forum.

      1. paradigmsearch profile image85
        paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Habee did that once. Bless her heart.

        An excellent idea. But I would want to be paid for my efforts, bloodsucking capitalist that I am. lol

        1. Writer Fox profile image78
          Writer Foxposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          OK.  We'll accept your money as the grand prize.

  16. Austinstar profile image83
    Austinstarposted 4 years ago

    You guys are cracking me up!

    1. kenneth avery profile image78
      kenneth averyposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks. We'll be here all week. Be sure to tip your waitress (if she wins Nightly Favorite Waitress Contest).

 
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