jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (19 posts)

Confused by Google DMCA dashboard

  1. alexadry profile image94
    alexadryposted 2 years ago

    So if I look at my Google DMCA dashboard, several of the websites reported for copying my hubs show as "approved"  and no longer pending, but if I go on the link, it's still live, and these are links I have reported back in October, so not sure why they are still live. I have read some where that  approved often doesn't mean removed but just not indexed, so the links may still appear, and if you want them completely removed, you must contact the hosting company. Is there any truth to that?

    1. Marisa Wright profile image95
      Marisa Wrightposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      If you report a website to Google, it doesn't get the site closed down (unless it's on Blogger) - it just means the site gets removed from search engine results. 

      To actually get the article removed, you must file a DMCA with either the site itself or the host.

      1. alexadry profile image94
        alexadryposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Thank you so much for clarifying this. Therefore, it looks like it should be a better option to just file with the host than wasting time with Google.

  2. Kylyssa profile image96
    Kylyssaposted 2 years ago

    Frequently, DMCA complaints to the host will result in no action. However, it's good form to send them anyway. But it's important to follow up with Google DMCAs because when Google removes a URL from search results it does everything you need it to do to avoid getting your search engine views diluted. Yes, you can still see the thief's URL if you go directly to it, but you can no longer find it via search engine.

    1. Marisa Wright profile image95
      Marisa Wrightposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I take the opposite approach.  I find hosts always take action - the key is to use their official DMCA form, don't just send them an email (you may have to Google to find it - e.g. "DMCA GoDaddy".

      The only times I have difficulty are when the host is in Russia, China or India.  That's when I resort to reporting to Google.

      1. Kylyssa profile image96
        Kylyssaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        I try the hosts first, but then I automatically file with Google in a week if nothing has happened.

        I was just trying to explain why it's not the end of the world if the host won't remove the infringing content; getting the URL taken out of Google results will provide a satisfactory result you can count on.

        Follow up is important.

        1. Marisa Wright profile image95
          Marisa Wrightposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          I allow two weeks, and then I chase the host again.  I can't think of a single instance where that hasn't worked, unless (like I said) the host was in Russia, India or China.

          I'd rather get these idiots taken off the air than have just my article removed from Google.

    2. Cardisa profile image92
      Cardisaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Every time I file a complaint with the host of a website I get quick positive results.

      1. alexadry profile image94
        alexadryposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        I think I will go this route from now on. I have been wasting my time with Google DMCA for too long and the results aren't satisfactory and additionally take a looong time.

        1. Cardisa profile image92
          Cardisaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          I only file with Google if it's one of theirs such as Blogger, Youtube, Adsense and so forth. Other than that, the site will still show up on Yahoo, Bing and other search engines which Google has no control over. Go for the jugular and file with the host. Most likely they'll remove the website or the offending page. Hosts hate bad reputations, and plagiarism is serious.

          1. Marisa Wright profile image95
            Marisa Wrightposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            "Go for the jugular" - yes, that's my thinking too!

            1. Cardisa profile image92
              Cardisaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              lol, can't help myself sometimes Marisa! lol

  3. alexadry profile image94
    alexadryposted 2 years ago

    While Google may remove the URL from being found on search engines, it looks like though people can still find your stolen article on the main website. At least, that's what it seems like. I went on the main page of the website and there was a directory and there was a link to my article. When I clicked on the link, it brought me to my article. So even if it doesn't get traffic directly from a Google search, it looks like it still gets traffic indirectly by those who land on the main page directory and click on the link. I rather have the article gone completely than these thieves still having my article on their page and people seeing it. Especially, when people start commenting how good the article is and the thief takes credit for it:(

    Interestingly on some other occasions, after filing a DMCA and following up, I get notice that the webpage URL of the stolen content no longer exists. Makes me wonder what criteria Google uses when deciding between a complete removal or just dropping it off search engines.

    1. Marisa Wright profile image95
      Marisa Wrightposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Google has NO authority to remove a page from any website except Blogger.   All they can do is remove the article from search engine results.

  4. alexadry profile image94
    alexadryposted 2 years ago

    Got it. Thanks for clearing that up for me, now everything is more clear.

    1. DrMark1961 profile image94
      DrMark1961posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Do you go after every site that is copying one of your hubs, even if it is not affecting your traffic?
      I have some health hubs that were mainly written to help dog owners take care of their pets, and I know you have a lot of those too. If you do not chase them down and file DMCA complaints, does Google come along later and penalize you for having multiple sites out there with the same content? Some of those sites are so small that they are not affecting my daily page views, but if they are going to get me penalized in the future I guess I need to do something about it.
      Thanks for your thoughts.

      1. alexadry profile image94
        alexadryposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        I don't tend to worry much about those small sites, my biggest issue is when websites copy not only my content, but also pictures of me and the dogs I train. I have all dog owners sign a form that allows me to use pictures/videos of their dogs online on my articles and I emphasize they'll go on my articles only. I cannot tolerate other websites using them without authorization. Also, I have been having big issues with some websites selling my articles in e-books or available to be downloaded for a charge. However, it also bothers me to see that message from Hubpages that my content was stolen, especially when my articles end up on pages of wanna-be dog trainers trying to build up a business and reputation using my words, pictures and ideas. Such unethical practices are revolting.

  5. alexadry profile image94
    alexadryposted 2 years ago

    Thanks a bunch Cardisa, will do.

    1. Cardisa profile image92
      Cardisaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      You're welcome smile

 
working