jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (18 posts)

I'd like feedback on my article: Tonsil Stones Causing Bad Breath: Here's How...

  1. Angelo Grant profile image87
    Angelo Grantposted 3 weeks ago

    Hi Hubbers,

    I'd like some help with passing the Quality Assessment Process. Will you please give feedback on my article Tonsil Stones Causing Bad Breath: Here's How to Get Rid of Them. What can I do to improve? Thanks!

  2. pen promulgates profile image79
    pen promulgatesposted 3 weeks ago

    The article is good, but are the images legal to use? They must have creative Common license.
    In the Title you say how to get rid of them whereas it's just one capsule that speaks of the cure. You can rework the title as per the content.
    Good luck.

  3. theraggededge profile image96
    theraggededgeposted 3 weeks ago

    Yep, that's a clearly copyrighted image from the Mayo Clinic right up front. You can't use it.

    It also looks like you have included a lot of copy and pasted material. Can't do that either.

  4. Jan Saints profile image85
    Jan Saintsposted 3 weeks ago

    Some paragraphs are big! You can break them down. You also need to include an author bio. In addition, add some references. This is a medical article, so you need to show expertise and authority or experience!

  5. JynBranton profile image80
    JynBrantonposted 3 weeks ago

    Good content, maybe break up the paragraphs a little more with call outs and use of media?

    1. theraggededge profile image96
      theraggededgeposted 3 weeks agoin reply to this

      That's because it's a close rewrite/copy & paste of:

      http://www.therabreath.com/tonsil-stones.html
      http://tonsilstonesadvisor.com/

      1. Angelo Grant profile image87
        Angelo Grantposted 3 weeks agoin reply to this

        Is it okay for me to use these sources as references?

        1. psycheskinner profile image80
          psycheskinnerposted 3 weeks agoin reply to this

          Hubpages wants you to write content, not quote it, and especially not quoting it without attribution.

          1. Angelo Grant profile image87
            Angelo Grantposted 3 weeks agoin reply to this

            I'll hope theraggededge replies to my question she clearly looked the article. Riding deer is the perfect example of written content that Hubpages likes without quotations and or the need for attribution!

            1. theraggededge profile image96
              theraggededgeposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

              If you want to use them as references you can, but make sure they are reputable medical sites, written by people with relevant qualifications. Tonsiladvisor is not. Their 'About' page is empty. The other one is spam. So it would be better to look for something with more authority.

              Don't forget, you can't use a copyright image.

              Riding deer? You've lost me.

              1. Angelo Grant profile image87
                Angelo Grantposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

                Thanks again for your valuable insight, I'm very grateful that you were kind enough to take the time to read, analyze and share your thoughts, I have benefited greatly from your wisdom as well as from most of the others on this thread. The deer portion of the comment was for the benefit of the other commentator.

            2. psycheskinner profile image80
              psycheskinnerposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

              Regardless of what you think of the topic, I wrote it myself and made pay out the last two months. Bottom line: plagiarism is not allowed. I answered your question accurately in an effort to be helpful. Although sometimes I wonder why I bother.

              1. Angelo Grant profile image87
                Angelo Grantposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

                I suspect you earn from the in-text links in that article do you mind sharing how it works?

                1. Marisa Wright profile image95
                  Marisa Wrightposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

                  I haven't looked at the article but it's unlikely she is earning from the in-text links unless they are Amazon. Affiliate links tend to be frowned on here and are likely to be snipped.

  6. Angelo Grant profile image87
    Angelo Grantposted 3 weeks ago

    Thank you all for your feedback, it was all very encouraging, thanks!

  7. paperfacets profile image92
    paperfacetsposted 3 weeks ago

    The piece reads too WebMd like. I noticed farther in the article that you have experienced stones. So have I and the only thing to work for me is your technique.

    Try to rewrite with your point of view instead.  The way it is how it does seem too average and generic. Change the title, minus bad breathe. Two gross subjects of 1. tonsil stones and 2. ridding them is good enough.

    Maybe the title could hint at the only way to rid tonsil stones is...

  8. Marisa Wright profile image95
    Marisa Wrightposted 2 weeks ago

    As Raggededge says, the content is basically copied from two medical sites. You can't do that here. You can refer to them, and you can quote short excerpts from them, but you can't take their content and use it to make the bulk of your article.

    1. Angelo Grant profile image87
      Angelo Grantposted 2 weeks agoin reply to this

      Learnt my lesson! If I ever do quote or paraphrase someone, a blog etc., I'll be careful to give the credit to the primary source like saying "According to Dr. Harold Katz, a Huffington Post contributor. We should recognize that giving credit to a secondary source for someone else's work is the worst form of plagiarism. That would be the most painful thing for me, to see my original work credited to someone else. Also, no more than 10-15% of anyone else's work should be a part of your article or else it's not yours.

 
working