I'd like feedback on my article: Health Benefits of Drinking Water in the Right.

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  1. talesofvikram profile image76
    talesofvikramposted 18 months ago

    Hi Hubbers,

    I'd like some help with passing the Quality Assessment Process. Will you please give feedback on my article? What can I do to improve? Thanks!
    Here is my article: Health Benefits of Drinking Water in the Right Way (must be signed in to view)

    1. AliciaC profile image99
      AliciaCposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      First, you need to include authoritative references for all the health advice in your article. All health articles need these references. I have to say that some of your recommendations are strange. Chilled water doesn't cause the contents of our digestive system to solidify, for example. You must back up your claims with references from reputable health organizations and journals.

      You also need to change the bold print to plain text. In addition, you should proofread the article. One error is that you have used "wired" instead of "weird".

      1. talesofvikram profile image76
        talesofvikramposted 18 months agoin reply to this

        Hi AliciaC,

        I have added the link of the article which talks about chilled water solidify the food..here's the link https://bit.ly/31utbk9. If you get time please read my friend.

        Thanks,
        Vikram Brahma

        1. theraggededge profile image98
          theraggededgeposted 18 months agoin reply to this

          You are referencing an article that was not written by a biologist or a nutritionist. Just because it's on the internet doesn't mean that it's authoritative.

          This is bio on that article, "Sharing a strong penchant for food, Sushmita loves all things good, cheesy and greasy. Her other favourite pastime activities other than discussing food includes, reading, watching movies and binge-watching TV shows."

          Is that someone who gives you confidence that she knows what she's talking about?

    2. OldRoses profile image96
      OldRosesposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      I have to agree with the other feedback.  You are making a lot of medical claims in your article without a shred of proof.  A good example of this is your claim that ice water is not good for digestion.  That is a cultural belief, not a scientific fact.  As proof of my claim that drinking ice water will not affect digestion is that here in the US, restaurants serve ice water with their meals.  If that ice water was negatively affecting their customers' digestion, then all of the restaurants in the US would be out of business.  You either need to do more research into the scientific proof of the "facts" that you are offering or you should write your article as an interesting look about the beliefs about drinking water in India.

      1. talesofvikram profile image76
        talesofvikramposted 18 months agoin reply to this

        Hi OldRoses,

        Thank you very much for your valuable feedback. Yes, many of you are thinking it's more related to a cultural belief but I shared few links. By the way, do you agree if I say lukewarm water is far more superior and good for health then cold water?

        Yes, you are right restaurants do serve mostly the cold ice water. Because if they will not serve them chilled they are tasteless. Try room temperature-water vs ice chilled water. But if you will meet any doctor, he will tell you the harmful effects of cold water. In-fact we must avoid drinking chilled water immediately after having a meal. And I exactly told the main reason.

        My cousin is a doctor and he told me straight - cold water is not good for health.

        Thanks, dear for your feedback. Keep in touch. If I will find more information will share with you buddy. But I know and my whole idea is you disclose many hidden facts which big companies will not disclose openly.



        Regards,
        Vikram Brahma

        1. OldRoses profile image96
          OldRosesposted 18 months agoin reply to this

          Please ask your cousin for copies of the scientific studies published in reputable medical journals proving his claim that cold water is unhealthful.  This is the kind of proof you must provide in your article regarding your claims about water.

  2. talesofvikram profile image76
    talesofvikramposted 18 months ago

    Hey AliciaC,

    Thanks a lot for your valuable feedback.

    I will try to make suitable changes in my articles. I thought we are not required to give backlinks to different websites.

    Have a great day my friend.

    Regards,
    Vikram Brahma

  3. talesofvikram profile image76
    talesofvikramposted 18 months ago

    Hi Theraggededge,

    Thanks for reading my article. Ok, I guess I should backlink to the more appropriate authentic article. But on the other hand, we all know cold water or chilled water from the fridge is not good for health especially for kids.

    Thanks once again smile

    Regards,
    Vikram Brahma

    1. theraggededge profile image98
      theraggededgeposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      Vikram, there is no 'on the other hand'. If you are writing about health topics, you must have the relevant knowledge and qualifications to back up the claims. If you don't, your article will not be moved to a network site. So you won't get any traffic and all your efforts will have been in vain.

      It might be a good idea to include 'Ayurvedic' in the title. It would probably do better traffic-wise. So something like "Ayurvedic Benefits of Drinking Water Correctly".

      1. talesofvikram profile image76
        talesofvikramposted 18 months agoin reply to this

        Hey Theraggededge,

        Thanks for giving valuable suggestion once again. Yes, I will make sure my articles include appropriate facts and references.

        Yes, definitely including Ayurvedic is sound good.

        Regards,
        Vikram Brahma

    2. DrMark1961 profile image96
      DrMark1961posted 18 months agoin reply to this

      No, we do not know that cold water from the fridge is not good for health. That is a custom of the place where you were raised, not a fact backed up by anything.

      1. talesofvikram profile image76
        talesofvikramposted 18 months agoin reply to this

        Hi DrMark1961,

        Thanks for showing interest and sharing your valuable feedback. I will sure love to share more updates related to this point.

        Regards,
        Vikram Braham

        1. DrMark1961 profile image96
          DrMark1961posted 18 months agoin reply to this

          I just wanted to let you know that in my culture (Brazilian subtropics) we also have that belief about cold water and little kids. As far as I know that is only a cultural belief.

          1. talesofvikram profile image76
            talesofvikramposted 18 months agoin reply to this

            Ok DrMark1961, I absolutely understand your point of view and appreciate your understanding about your valuable cultural belief.

            In fact, I admire Bazil for its super football culture, carnival festival and beach. In fact, my oldest internet friend is from Bazil, Miss L. Mariotto.

      2. Butterfly67 profile image92
        Butterfly67posted 18 months agoin reply to this

        I have never heard of the fact that cold water is bad for your health (I am from the UK) so yes, you would need some scientific evidence to back that up!

        Reading the article, it all sounds like hearsay with no evidence so I for one would be wondering what scientific basis any of these facts are based on.

        1. talesofvikram profile image76
          talesofvikramposted 18 months agoin reply to this

          Hey Butterfly67,

          Thank you dear for your valuable feedback. Yes, will look for more scientific evidence but some of the facts I shared are simple to understand.

          But, you can do your own research too regarding cold water, my friend. Have a great day. Take care of baby smile my friend.

          Regards,
          Vikram Brahma

  4. FatFreddysCat profile image95
    FatFreddysCatposted 18 months ago

    Unless you're pouring it into your ears or spilling it onto your shirt, is there really a "wrong" way to drink water?

    1. talesofvikram profile image76
      talesofvikramposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      Hey FatFreddsCat,


      Thanks for checking out the article. When the water has feelings and is affected by your thoughts and emotions. A Japanese scientist Dr. Masaru Emoto has proved it through experients.

      Check his article here: https://www.masaru-emoto.net/en/science … rom-water/

      Hope this will give new insights but experiments are done by the scientist himself.

      Water is no ordinary thing which we human being so. And the way we use it really destroy or bring miracles in our life.

      Regards,
      Vikram Brahma

  5. psycheskinner profile image84
    psycheskinnerposted 18 months ago

    You either provide published scientific evidence (e.g. peer-reviewed research or policy from a scientific authority like the surgeon general), or you describe them as subjective cultural beliefs.  those are the options.

    1. talesofvikram profile image76
      talesofvikramposted 18 months agoin reply to this

      Hey Psycheskinner,

      Thanks for your valuable feedback. Yes, I will search for more evidence.

      Have a great day my friend.

      When the water has feelings and is affected by your thoughts and emotions. A Japanese scientist Dr. Masaru Emoto has proved it through experients.

      Check his article here: https://www.masaru-emoto.net/en/science … rom-water/

      Hope this will give new insights but experiments are done by the scientist himself.

      Regards,
      Vikram Brahma

      1. CYong74 profile image98
        CYong74posted 18 months agoin reply to this

        Sorry to be harsh Vikram, but you have an extremely misguided mentality regarding all of this.

        To begin with, Masaru Emoto is not a scientist. He is a pseudoscientist - I hope you understand what that means. He has also been roundly criticized by the scientific community and while you can claim there is some sort of conspiracy behind that, one wonders why pseudoscientists inevitably refuse to share empirical evidence. If something is a fact, why can't it be repeatedly proven? Or demonstrated? Or easily shown?

        Secondly, if you are but starting to formally research this topic, then you shouldn't be writing about it. It shows you actually know nothing of significance. The fact that you refuse to differentiate science from  hearsay and urban myths, and do not bother with credibility of information, worsens this.

        Lastly, dispensing health tips without any verifiable evidence or knowledge is irresponsible. Immoral too, to an extent. You can liberally do so on your own blog, at your own risk. But no major online platform will accept your writing. No platform wants to be responsible for any consequences.

  6. FatFreddysCat profile image95
    FatFreddysCatposted 18 months ago

    Oooooo-kay. I'm just going to nod and smile politely as I head for the exit. (leaves)

 
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