Can you offer safe haven for Hubbers in the path of hurricane?

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  1. LongTimeMother profile image96
    LongTimeMotherposted 2 months ago

    If I lived in the US I’d be inviting those in the path of the giant hurricane to come stay at my home for a few days ... to keep them safe until the danger has passed.

    I know of two families in South Carolina and Virginia who I’d love to quickly get on a plane to somewhere safe.

    1. RTalloni profile image91
      RTalloniposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Many churches are opening facilities and homes to others. They could contact red cross or other agencies. If they want to get out of the way of the hurricane they can.

      1. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image99
        TIMETRAVELER2posted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Not everybody is physically able to get out.  Some people are too ill to be transportable, others have no means to do so and nobody to ask for help.  Many lie ill in hospitals, too.  It isn't as easy as it sounds.  We ran from the last Florida Hurricane days in advance and were lucky to even be able to find gasoline.  Traffic was a nightmare, even though we stayed off of the main roads.  It's more difficult than most people realize.

        1. RTalloni profile image91
          RTalloniposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          Yes, it really can be far more difficult than people realize. Friends who lived near an interstate once told of taking food and drink out to stopped traffic. It was a very difficult situation, but people in America always try to help. It may not seem like enough help to other people but they do not know the realities of the situation.

          Besides police,  aid workers, power crews, and other emergency personnel have been on the move for days. Even they can only do so much, they are not all-powerful entities. Their limitations are a part of the reality. They work hard but can only try to do all they possibly can. Those in the mandatory evacuation areas have had the opportunity and help to get out if they wanted to no matter their need.

          1. tsadjatko profile image60
            tsadjatkoposted 2 months agoin reply to this

            Hi Time travelor! Great input to the discussion as you always do.

            But the topic here is “Can you offer safe haven for Hubbers in the path of hurricane?”

            What say you? Or would those people be better off if they lived in Australia as the Hubber of this topic feels.

            1. RTalloni profile image91
              RTalloniposted 2 months agoin reply to this

              Not sure if you just want to hear from Time Traveler, but I certainly could offer them safe haven. I live far enough away from the affected coastal areas that there is plenty of available safe haven, not so much in hotels now, but otherwise, which is what it sounds like they need if they really have no money to pay for accommodations.

    2. tsadjatko profile image60
      tsadjatkoposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Long time mother, I think that is a commendable attitude you have toward your fellow citizens! More people should be like you. But you did go on to say you’d invite families you know. I am absolutely certain people who know any of the families evacuating are doing exactly what you suggest - Australia isn’t the only country whose citizens care about fellow citizens. Inviting strangers into your house however is not a wise thing to do when there are all sorts of safety nets people have access to and nobody need put themselves at the risk of inviting a stranger into their family.

    3. Jean Bakula profile image98
      Jean Bakulaposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Hi,
      Long time no see. People have become really careful about who they let into their homes in these times. Shelters are not safe and children are often separated from families if over 12--open to sexual abuse.

      The last NJ snow storm we had in March left me without power for 4 days in single digit temps. My own sister in law didn't offer to take us in and I paid to live in a hotel.

      1. LongTimeMother profile image96
        LongTimeMotherposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Hi Jean. You are one of the many hubbers I would happily invite into my home if it would help you when you were in a tight spot. Although we’ve never met, I was deeply moved by the death of your husband and over the years you’ve shown yourself to be the kind of woman who poses no threat to society. So yes, my door is always open should you find yourself in my part of the world.

        Your sister in law disappoints me greatly. I’m sorry she wasn’t there for you when you needed her.

    4. Ilonagarden profile image89
      Ilonagardenposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      I think people overseas may misunderstand the situation. Only hearing national news reports and bulletins, they think more personal and localized help is not available. The evacuations are mainly concerned with getting people out of harms way as quickly as possible. Details of dealing with peoples needs are usually taken care of in a way that does not reach news media until after the fact, if at all.

      People do reach out and help. My family experienced a long term outage during a rare inland hurricane and a neighbor lent an extra generator after the first couple days. People do this kind of thing all the time: share food, needs, shelter... but it isn't officially coordinated.
      Shelters, etc. are the officially coordinated aid for those displaced by disasters.

      1. RTalloni profile image91
        RTalloniposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        So glad you added your experience. People with no first-hand information cannot understand. News media is in business to primarily make money and sensationalized reports do that for them. The reality is that warnings about the possibilities and help for any needs has been available for days.

        One shelter near the coast just reported they have food and water for 60,000 people for several days. There are many, many other official shelters, as well as other types of facilities like camps, churches, and individuals welcoming those in need of help.

        The scope and scale of available help is really quite magnificent if we stop and think about it. There will always be those who say it was never enough, but there is only so much that can be done. That is a reality of this thing called life.

        People who live in hurricane prone areas really need to evaluate whether they should be living there. They shouldn't complain about what is a known unpredictable inevitability. Thankfully, relatively few people do that as many involved are true grownups. Sadly, those few are the ones the news media chooses to focus on, inflaming those who do not have first-hand knowledge of the truth of the situation.

  2. DrMark1961 profile image98
    DrMark1961posted 2 months ago

    The reason people no longer pick up hitchikers, or invite strangers to their home during a natural disaster, is violence. I know it happens in your country, in mine, and in the US. I would not want to risk the health of my children to a random visitor that I did not know.

    1. RTalloni profile image91
      RTalloniposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      This is a huge concern to consider in such times. We would like to think people would be grateful for help but the truth is that the shelters are dangerous places. One cannot know who is who.

      It is crucial for people to plan ahead for disasters to guard their safety and well-being as much as possible. No one is stuck if they want to get out, but they are far safer if they plan ahead instead of wanting someone else to do it for them.

      1. Jackie Lynnley profile image89
        Jackie Lynnleyposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        So true, the US has been a loving and generous country but all of a sudden we have had so many attacks from the very people we let in and literally supported. We are not safe anymore and that is the truth. I hope we will get back there again...soon.

  3. LongTimeMother profile image96
    LongTimeMotherposted 2 months ago

    I don’t consider active hubbers whose presence I’ve been aware of and hubs I’ve been reading to be ‘strangers’, even though I’ve never met them.

    I don’t know how the system works in the US but I’d be surprised if it is an easy thing to find somewhere to stay outside the danger area without having to pay for accommodation.

    In Australia it is pretty common to open your home to ‘strangers’ in times of natural disasters. Thanks for reminding me again how happy I am that I don’t live in the US.

    Good luck to everyone in the path of the storm who lacks the bank balance to relocate themselves with ease.

    1. RTalloni profile image91
      RTalloniposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      But we are opening our facilities, churches, and homes. The roads and cities  in the upstate SC, western NC, Tennessee are packed with people from the coastal areas. No one is without a place to go if they want to do so. Many chose to pay for accommodations because they like their privacy. I don't blame them. If it looked like I was even possibly going to be told to evacuate I would do so before the announcement so I could have mine. Still, no one, whether they can pay or not, is without safe haven if they want it.

    2. tsadjatko profile image60
      tsadjatkoposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Oh so you also meant hubber’s that you know over the internet but have never met. I guess since hub pages requires you prove your identity you’d expect all hubber’s to not be strangers? oh I forgot, hubber’s aren’t required to prove anything.

      Logic dictates if you don’t know how the system works in the United States you have have no reason to believe it isn’t an easy thing...As rtalloni said “no one, whether they can pay or not, is without safe haven if they want it.”

      America isn’t the outback you know, or would you?

  4. Wesman Todd Shaw profile image98
    Wesman Todd Shawposted 2 months ago

    Nope, but were anyone in need to make it to my travel trailer, there is another bed, and plenty to eat. I have no transportation. I'm merely a writer on the web.

  5. erorantes profile image53
    erorantesposted 2 months ago

    For those who do not have a shelter ready. Hotels are good. Some hotels take you with your pets. It cost money, but if you share it other people; the cost it is less. La Quinta is great. They give you breakfast and they allow you to take fruits , yogurt to your room for snack. Dinner, you most bring a lot for dinners to the hotel. They do not offered dinner. Talk to friends and neighbors, it is good to save yourself and others. Lift and Uber are great to pick up people with disabilities. Or, the county  is ready to help. For those who do not know, you can get a ticket to stay in a hotel for free. Call the county hot line if you need help. Later, The affected people get a card for food and gas. Some programs paid you hotel staying during the storm after. Good luck to all. God help you. Thank you for starting this topic to help others.

    1. RTalloni profile image91
      RTalloniposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      So helpful...the kind of post that could be useful! Thank you for adding this information for people to check out! The resources are not unlimited, but when one option is used up others are available. Indeed, "The country is ready to help!"

  6. LongTimeMother profile image96
    LongTimeMotherposted 2 months ago

    Thanks, Wesman (Wiseman!) for responding to my question in the spirit in which I asked it. A bed is often all that someone needs.

    We’re all aware of the reasons why many people choose not to invite others into their homes, and I’m old enough and experienced enough to be aware of them ... and I really doubt anyone needed to be reminded.

    And I also know some individuals are quicker to make excuses for not helping than others. For my part, I’m always prepared to consider the pros and cons before applying a blanket ‘no’.

    For instance, last weekend my husband and I instantly offered to accommodate a mother and her two children (without knowing any of them) from elsewhere in Australia for free for up to six weeks while they figure out a safe strategy for relocation. Why? Because the potential danger to them far outweighed any potential inconvenience to us. And yes, we still have a teenage daughter at home with us but we’ve raised her in a way that we’re confident she has the skills and abilities to cope admirably.

    I became a foster mum in 1992, and my teenager is a loving auntie to my foster daughter’s children. One of my adult kids has become a foster parent herself. Perhaps it is in our DNA not to be frightened.

    I wasn’t criticising the American system, just asking a question. It always amazes me how quickly some in your part of the world will jump to be defensive. Not all, of course, but always some.

  7. LongTimeMother profile image96
    LongTimeMotherposted 2 months ago

    Just for the record, I’d like to resond to the comment, “America isn’t the outback you know, or would you?“

    Firstly, most Australians don’t live in the outback, and only a fool would think they do. Secondly, the suggestion that anyone thinks ‘America is the outback’ is also foolish.

    This particular Australian has travelled to the US many times during the past 40 years. In fact I’ve probably seen more parts of America than most Americans.

    So please, drop the condescending attitude. If you’re going to speak with me (or any of the other international writers here on HP) you’d do well to keep your arrogance in check.

    I never suggested “those people would be better off living in Australia” ... they’re your words, not mine.

    This is an international community of writers. I suggest you stop thinking of HP as only American and broaden your attitude.

    1. tsadjatko profile image60
      tsadjatkoposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Hey I started my comments off with commending your attitude and post and you chose to belittle my country by saying you are glad you don’t live here. Talk about snide remarks, you opened that door and evidently are pretty thin skinned about my pointing out you are opinionated about things you admitted you know nothing about.

      1. LongTimeMother profile image96
        LongTimeMotherposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Hmm, So you pat yourself on your back for the opening of your first post, with no mention at all of your second post ... the one I was responding to. Are you equally as proud of that one?

        Look at the posts in chronological order, and then tell us all again how great you are.

        I never criticised America or Americans and I never said people would be better off living in Australia.

        And I certainly never ‘admitted’ I ‘know nothing’ about the preparations for the hurricane. I’ve been watching CNN and other news channels around the clock for days.

        1. tsadjatko profile image60
          tsadjatkoposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          You know if you can’t be honest about what you put right here in print maybe you shouldn’t be commenting on forums

          You said you were glad you live in Australia and not America.

          You say you never admitted you know nothing about how things are handled in America, well then why did I find this quote in your comment?

          “I don’t know how the system works in the US but I’d be surprised if it is an easy thing to find somewhere to stay outside the danger area without having to pay for accommodation.”

          Really, the tone of your discussion right from your title to you lying about what you wrote is not one of respect for America or Americans.

          But after reading about this study, I am not surprised.

          https://www.theherald.com.au/story/4780 … ospitable/

          1. LongTimeMother profile image96
            LongTimeMotherposted 2 months agoin reply to this

            Okay, we get it, you think you’re clever. Instead of admitting you might have been mistaken in the way you interpreted what I wrote, you attempt to discredit all Australians by seeking out an article published seven years ago in a little-known newspaper with no reference to the study of which he speaks.

            Seems you’re simply trying to project onto me one of your own personal qualities. It is you, not me, showing disrespect for another nation and it’s people.

            I already addressed the issue of why I’m happy I live here instead of the US in a different reply, and don’t feel the need to repeat myself.

            If you can’t be polite and resist the urge to accuse others of lying when there’s any kind of misunderstanding, perhaps you shouldn’t be commenting on the forums.

            1. tsadjatko profile image60
              tsadjatkoposted 2 months agoin reply to this

              Whether or not you think I was mistaken because I can’t read your mind you said what you said, right there in black and white and there is no question that you didn’t so to say you never said it is a lie and any way you try to spin it is just another lie.

              Instead of trying your best to salvage your ego from all your comments why don’t you just admit you came off like you did as multiple people here see it and either own it or apologize for it but it doesn’t help you to try and lie your way out of it.

  8. snakeslane profile image83
    snakeslaneposted 2 months ago

    Hey LongTimeMother, I appreciate your posting. It's all we can do sometimes, when we are far away, and want to help. Your concern is clearly genuine, and from the heart. Not sure how anyone could misunderstand that.

    1. RTalloni profile image91
      RTalloniposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      Though good never comes from snide remarks, after the heartfelt post this person did attack Americans for not doing enough according to her thinking. The truth is that Americans have a long-standing record of reaching out to help others. That is not to say other nations do not have such a record, but we do have a good one. Sure, there will always be those who cry "Not enough!" but no nation has unlimited resources and strength.

      In this case, and thanks to technology's advances, preparations and warnings were in place days before the storm hit. It was a mistake to lash out at Americans as she did when she did not understand the awesome effort already underway to try and help everyone in the path of the storm. Reports are saying that thanks to early warnings the preparations and available man-power for help is unprecedented.

      All were not willing to accept the warnings offered. There are a variety of reasons for such responses. However, the bottom line was the same for each. Many spent last night on rooftops because they refused to evacuate per the warnings. They were warned that if they needed help it might have to be delayed.

      Because it was too dangerous for both rescuers and those who resisted the warnings to attempt a rescue at the initial onslaught on the coast in the night they had to wait it out. It was their sad choice. Guardsmen are now risking their lives to attempt the rescues, which should make all of us both thankful and angry.

      Making a choice like that was their right, but some of these people even kept their children in harm's way. This is an example of how the truth often sheds needed light on situations. Two take aways for us are 1) making assumptions about others' situations is always a mistake and 2) flaring up when others try to explain their situation is also always a mistake.

      When it comes to reading the written word we should try to give the benefit of the doubt, remembering that we have no voice inflections or facial expressions to help us understand a writer's intent. As well, writers have a responsibility to work at simple clarity (which I find is a continuing effort) in offering useful information.

      1. Jackie Lynnley profile image89
        Jackie Lynnleyposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Well said!

        1. tsadjatko profile image60
          tsadjatkoposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          Ditto

  9. LongTimeMother profile image96
    LongTimeMotherposted 2 months ago

    I started this post because I was worried about two Hubbers with families with young children who were not in the official evacuation zones and were adequately stocked with supplies but who had simply said the predicted storm path might change so they had to be prepared for flooding and lengthy power outage.

    Silly me, I wondered if there might be some kind-hearted hubbers in America who rattled around in large houses with spare rooms or a country cabin or beach house they rarely used in a location outside the danger area. So I put up a post asking a simple question. If someone had responded positively, I thought it would be relatively simple to contact them via email and discuss it with them.

    I hadn't even mentioned it to the hubbers themselves. I was just testing the water. So how on earth did anyone think I was being critical of the measures being taken to prepare for the hurricane? And why did I become the target of such criticism?

    Robert, please share direct quotes from me to support your accusations that I ....
    - 'attacked Americans for not doing enough according to her thinking'
    - 'lashed out at Americans'

    Robert, you also wrote:
    "Two take aways for us are 1) making assumptions about others' situations is always a
    mistake and 2) flaring up when others try to explain their situation is also always a mistake."

    So I think you should give consideration to all the assumptions made in this thread and just who made them ... and I ask you to take a look at the posts in chronological order and tell me just who it was that was 'flaring up' when I tried to explain my situation.

    All the 'assumptions' made by you and a few others created an unrealistic (and inaccurate) picture of the situation. Nowhere in my story did I say or even suggest the hubbers I was concerned about were ignoring warnings to evacuate. I just would have liked to help them avoid having kids frightened by the storm.

    As it turns out, about 400,000 properties lost power before the hurricane even reached the land. Last report I heard, over 900,000 'customers' (presumably including businesses but the majority I would think to be homes) are without power and facing at least a week before it is restored. I don't know if there are any hubbers among them, and I don't know whether or not they might have spotted this thread before they lost power. (If they did, they may well have been hoping to see someone saying, "Sure, I could accommodate a few people for a week or two if they promise to put the toilet seat down.")

    And if anyone had asked me instead of making assumptions, I'd have explained why I said I'm glad I don't live in the US.

    I was repeatedly reminded of the dangers Americans face including ... "Inviting strangers into your house however is not a wise thing to do ..." and ... "nobody need put themselves at the risk of inviting a stranger into their family."

    Well, as you probably know, in Australia we have tough gun laws. Americans have much easier access to guns. So yes, I'm glad I don't live in a country where people can obtain guns so easily and people are so concerned about interacting with strangers. Sorry if that wasn't immediately clear  .... but I don't understand why you reacted the way you did.

    I honestly can't imagine any Australian - including our most patriotic Australians - who would care if an American said they're glad they don't live in Australia. We are way too laid-back down here to care. Yep, another reason why I'm glad I'm living here. 

    I've written back to thank the hubbers who contacted me via Personal Messaging and email offering their support. They could see I wasn't attacking Americans or America. Why can't you?

    1. RTalloni profile image91
      RTalloniposted 2 months agoin reply to this

      The initial "If I lived in the US I’d be inviting those in the path of the giant hurricane to come stay at my home for a few days ... to keep them safe until the danger has passed..." appeared to be an intimation that you would be the only one in the USA inviting those in the path of the giant hurricane to stay at your home...if you did live here. I said nothing about that intimation initially, giving the benefit of the doubt because I was not sure if you intended it to appear that way. In my response a little insight into the reality of the situation here was offered. Then others tried to explain a little more in their responses.

      The next "In Australia it is pretty common to open your home to ‘strangers’ in times of natural disasters. Thanks for reminding me again how happy I am that I don’t live in the US" was clearly a comparative slash at Americans but hubbers continued to try to offer helpful information so any one reading could understand the situation better.

      It is true that flare ups have come from both countries but at least some of that was in defense of the initial volley, though that does not make responding in a flared up manner the wise thing to do.

      It is kind that you wanted to help the people you were concerned about, as well as their children, but responses trying to rest your fears about them did not seem to help. No one was without help if they wanted it, if they would accept it.  There are many interviews out now from people who regret making the decision not to heed the warnings, not to listen to advice, not to accept help.

      There are a few interviews of people whining about how they didn't have the resources to get out of harm's way, but that is just excuse making. Everyone, even inland people, had the opportunity to get help if they wanted it. There was plenty of notice, plenty of aid if they wanted to ask for it. Waiting until it was too late is too late to complain. They own their decision.

      Beyond that, anyone wanting to live at or near the coast should decide whether they are mentally, physically, and financially able to live in a hurricane prone area before moving there. It's an important decision with big ramifications for every year's hurricane season.

      I apologize if the word attack was too strong to describe your responses. It is too easy to misunderstand the written word, especially if intent is something other than the words used imply. I would not presume to speak for others, but I personally tried to help you (and anyone else reading) understand that help of all kinds was available to any one in need.

      I do not apologize for defending my fellow Americans from California to Florida who have and are continuing to reach out to help those in need or the system that has already worked long and hard to provide evolving information and aid to a wide range and huge amount of people. They still face an unbelievably difficult task in helping communities pick up the pieces before another hurricane develops. 

      I hope this helps you better understand the responses. Again, I do not speak for others as I do not know everything they are thinking, all that their experience brings to the dialogue, or how they feel about any of it, but even in the frustrated responses there was an attempt to offer insight. When disaster hits only those in the middle of it can really understand the situation. Onlookers must listen compassionately, curiously, and carefully if they want to understand.

      1. LongTimeMother profile image96
        LongTimeMotherposted 2 months agoin reply to this

        Oh, goodness. How could you possibly think that anyone would be stupid enough to suggest they’d be the only one offering help to people in the path of a hurricane? Does your brain really work like that?

        Did it not cross your mind, ‘Oh, that’s nice. She’d like to help if she was here.’?

        I never argued against or disputed any of the helpful advice offered by readers. But I certainly didn’t feel the need to respond to every comment. Instead of encouraging a continuing discussion about related issues, I was waiting to see if anyone would actually answer my original question.

        I don’t understand why you feel/felt the need to ‘defend’ the people helping over there. What were you ‘defending’ them from?

        You don’t need to speak for other hubbers, Robert. I understand why most wrote what they did and I have no issue with that. They were, as you say, being helpful.

        What I object to is being misrepresented as some kind of ‘bad guy’ who slams America and Americans. Some of my closest friends are American and I have, as I mentioned earlier, been to the US many times.

        Now I for one would like to move on and turn my time and attention to figuring out how I can play my small part in assisting some of the hurricane victims.

        I assure you, I won’t be turning to the HP forums for ideas or input. I don’t want to risk being misinterpreted again. smile

        1. tsadjatko profile image60
          tsadjatkoposted 2 months agoin reply to this

          Finally we agree on something. I think that you absolutely shouldn’t turn to the forums because chances are the way you express yourself and the fact we can’t read your mind, you most likely will be misinterpreted.

  10. RTalloni profile image91
    RTalloniposted 2 months ago

    LONGTIMEMOTHER:
    Again, I apologize for any misunderstanding.

  11. Tim Truzy info4u profile image97
    Tim Truzy info4uposted 8 weeks ago

    As a person who is continuing to wave goodbye to Florence, Hubbers should know communities around here did organize. High schools were shelters for people from coastal N.C. and S.C. moved swiftly to evacuate people. Unfortunately, 31 people died, but the vast majority of individuals did leave safely.
    Last night, a tornado touched down in Richmond, VA, but we have seen no further fatalities.
    Great post, Long-Time mother, but America hasn't turned into a barbarian dwelling. It just seems that way.

 
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