Trust Maven? I don't think so!

Jump to Last Post 1-6 of 6 discussions (21 posts)
  1. DzyMsLizzy profile image94
    DzyMsLizzyposted 6 weeks ago

    I just watched a Maven video on crafting a good title.  I was not impressed in the least!

    Not only did they contradict themselves, they also showed a failure to proofread, and there was a very obvious spellling error in one of the bullet points.

    First, they talked about creating "long tail" titles, for better search results for the readers, and not for Google: "Choosing a Showerhead," vs. "How to Choose a Showerhead (What to Look For)."
    They said the second option was preferrable.  A bit later on, they said not to use such long titles that Google would truncate it with an ellipsis.  The second version would seem to fall into just that category.

    Further along, they said a title should not be written as click bait...except that they spelled it "bate."

    WOW!!
    And this is the outfit that bought HP, and is presumably (through HP) telling us how to write and succeed???!!!

    1. viryabo profile image94
      viryaboposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

      My goodness!

  2. Jodah profile image93
    Jodahposted 6 weeks ago

    You have me worried.

  3. EricDockett profile image97
    EricDockettposted 6 weeks ago

    I just watched the video and I don't understand why you'd be alarmed. It seemed like mostly good advice to me. The speaker did not contradict himself about title length. Google will display ~50-60 characters of the title tag. With spaces and parenthesis, that longer title is only 45 characters and unlikely to be truncated. Maybe that part could have been explained a little better for clarity.

    Can't account for the word misuse. Maybe they can fix that part so people don't point and laugh. We all make mistakes, though.

    Also, I could be wrong, but I believe one of the HP editors creates those videos, so maybe that might make everyone feel more comfortable?

    1. samanthacubbison profile imageSTAFF
      samanthacubbisonposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

      ^ Yes, it was only 45 characters, and the point was that it contained better keywords than the first option. But it could have been explained a little better!

      And yes, our team works very hard to create these videos, so any concern about the Maven is not necessary. To reiterate what EricDockett said, we all make mistakes. Even seasoned authors miss a typo here or there.

      My hope is that these videos help new and struggling authors find their footing and their place on the platform! I've really enjoyed reading the feedback on the other videos so far. smile

      1. letstalkabouteduc profile image95
        letstalkabouteducposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

        I read recently that a title can now be 70 characters before getting truncated. Is that correct, Samantha?

        1. samanthacubbison profile imageSTAFF
          samanthacubbisonposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

          We stand behind the 50–60 characters, but here's something from our FAQ:

          "A title should not truncate on SERP. Be aware that Google only displays the first 50–60 characters of a title tag. But even in a 60-character title, the last few characters may be truncated in SERP (this generally happens to about 10% of titles). To prevent this, use the MOZ title tool to check your title tag, but know that it isn't always 100% accurate."

          1. DzyMsLizzy profile image94
            DzyMsLizzyposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

            Okay, I admit I suck at understanding some of the technical behind-the-scenes jargon.  What is "SERP?"

            1. EricFarmer8x profile image97
              EricFarmer8xposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

              Search engine results page. Basically what you see when you search for anything.

              She is saying sometimes titles get cut off even when they are under 60 characters.

  4. Rupert Taylor profile image95
    Rupert Taylorposted 6 weeks ago

    It has been my experience that any time you embark on writing about writing you will inevitably commit the most egregious howlers possible. It is an immutable law.

  5. MizBejabbers profile image88
    MizBejabbersposted 6 weeks ago

    Well, Maven didn't ask for my services, so I don't bother to visit their website. Therefore, I can't pass judgment on them.

    1. samanthacubbison profile imageSTAFF
      samanthacubbisonposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

      I think that's a good way of going about it. Really, things haven't changed much for HubPages authors. Our internal processes have remained relatively the same as well. I hope that your user experience is still more or less the same. smile

      1. paradigmsearch profile image88
        paradigmsearchposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

        HP has two internal processes that I do believe are deal-breakers for many writers that would otherwise write here. And I'm pretty sure that HP is the only publishing entity that engages in these two practices, kind of odd actually that HP still does them. I realize that these practices are a carryover from the old days, but these days they are downright destructive for/to HP.

        Update. Maven does not engage in these two particular practices/processes, only HP.

        1. samanthacubbison profile imageSTAFF
          samanthacubbisonposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

          I think you have to be more specific. Otherwise, I really have no idea what you're talking about!

          1. paradigmsearch profile image88
            paradigmsearchposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

            HP needs to drop me an email and entice me to tell them. big_smile

        2. DzyMsLizzy profile image94
          DzyMsLizzyposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

          WHAT practices?????

          1. paradigmsearch profile image88
            paradigmsearchposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

            Nothing unethical, just unwise these days.

            1. DzyMsLizzy profile image94
              DzyMsLizzyposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

              Still very vague; could you be more specific???

              1. paradigmsearch profile image88
                paradigmsearchposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

                Nah, the information is valuable enough that HP should pay me for it. big_smile

    2. DzyMsLizzy profile image94
      DzyMsLizzyposted 6 weeks agoin reply to this

      I didn't seek out their site; this was sent to me in an email; HP Weekly.

  6. PaulGoodman67 profile image96
    PaulGoodman67posted 6 weeks ago

    It's provides a good argument for doing what HP recommends to its writers: Get someone else to check your work before you put it online and into the public domain! smile

 
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