Can anyone identify this tree?

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  1. Polly C profile image94
    Polly Cposted 6 years ago

    photographed in the mediterranaen/adriatic region on the island of Hvar, Croatia?
    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/6071761_f248.jpg

    1. Polly C profile image94
      Polly Cposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I know it's not that clear, but any ideas would help

  2. 2uesday profile image83
    2uesdayposted 6 years ago

    This is it Polly I am always impressed by the vibrant color of them when in Greece.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bougainvillea


    I typed in bougainvillea for Google images to see examples of it, to check I had the name correct.

    Hope that helps, grey day in the UK that brightened it a bit.

    1. Polly C profile image94
      Polly Cposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks tuesday - yes, it is a very grey day here, oh to be somewhere warm and sunny like in the picture!

    2. Cardisa profile image90
      Cardisaposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, is a bougainvillea alright. Very popular here in Jamaica. Some flowers red, deep purple, a lilac colour, white and of course the pink you are looking at.

  3. sen.sush23 profile image61
    sen.sush23posted 6 years ago

    Yes, it is a bougainvillea. The color that is shown in your photograph is the most common variety. In our house, we had two less common colors - an orange variety and a dark maroon. White bougainvillea are also quite common in India. We usually use these as creepers on the gate or the front porch, and the cascading flowers create a beautiful facade to even the most drab exterior of any home.

    1. Polly C profile image94
      Polly Cposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you sen.sush - yes, they are very beautiful and eye-catching smile

  4. IzzyM profile image88
    IzzyMposted 6 years ago

    They are also prickly, being covered with barbs and spikes. I had one but it died when I tried to move it to a more sensible place - I'd initially planted it in my garden next to the street, and it was reaching out and scratching people trying to walk on the pavement outside.

    Loads of my neighbours have them, so I just enjoy theirs from a safe distance LOL

    1. mary615 profile image93
      mary615posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      This is one of my favorite!  Here in S. Fl. it grows very tall, and the more you prune it,  the faster it grows.  It reminds me of a rose bush:  it's rewards in it's beauty is worth the pain it causes.  I agree it's a Bougainvillia.

      1. rebekahELLE profile image87
        rebekahELLEposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        I have one in my backyard. These trees are very beautiful.

  5. Pearldiver profile image81
    Pearldiverposted 6 years ago

    The most common variety in the Southern Hemisphere is called Scarlet O'Hara and is a blood red color.  Really impressive when in full bloom, but Bougainvillia make a hell of a mess dropping foliage and defending themselves with long hook-like thorns.  You are better off planting Clematis smile

  6. IzzyM profile image88
    IzzyMposted 6 years ago

    My neighbours across the road right now. They are just coming into flower. She has two different colors.

    http://s2.hubimg.com/u/6072397_f248.jpg

  7. Polly C profile image94
    Polly Cposted 6 years ago

    Thanks for everyone's input, seems unanimous - it's great to have such a helpful forum, better than an encyclopedia!  I tried to find out myself on google but wasn't sure what on earth it was. When we first saw it we loved it so much that we all had a photo taken with it.

    Izzy and Rebekkah, you are so lucky to be able to see them from your own houses - better than the ugly conifers somebody planted in the garden of the house we've just bought!

    Well, back to this cold and rainy day in England, and the annoying fact that I have had to abandon my car due to the windscreen wipers failing while I was driving!

    1. mary615 profile image93
      mary615posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Too bad you are not in Puerto Rico where it's 80 degrees and NO humidity.  I have a photo of a strange looking tree that I'd like to know what it is.  I'm so dumb, I can't figure our to post the photo.  I did it once before, but I'm not having any luck doing it again.  I hit import, find the photo and that's as far as I can go.  Will keep trying cause it is really unusual.

      1. IzzyM profile image88
        IzzyMposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        If the photo is on the net, hit import and navigate to the web address where the photo is. If it's on your computer, hit upload and navigate to the folder, and click on it to post.

        1. mary615 profile image93
          mary615posted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Thanks, that what I did.  It's on my computer. I did it like I would do for a Hub.  I'll try again.  I'm determined.  Like I said I did this once before with NO trouble.

          1. mary615 profile image93
            mary615posted 6 years agoin reply to this

            Third time, I did it!

    2. rebekahELLE profile image87
      rebekahELLEposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Polly, sorry about the rainy day. My yard has a lot of trees. Along the back fence there are various plants that attract butterflies. I have a beautiful passion flower vine that grows on the fence, but they easily can take over an area, so I had to cut it back. There is also night blooming jasmine. The yard requires upkeep, but it's worth it when everything is in bloom. Now there are leaves on the ground from the maple trees.

      1. Greek One profile image75
        Greek Oneposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        "Now there are leaves on the ground from the maple trees...."

        http://3.bp.blogspot.com/__1nn2kem-98/RvRY5251XPI/AAAAAAAAAUo/9I7T7bqkx8A/s400/Toronto_Maple_Leafs.gif

  8. Greek One profile image75
    Greek Oneposted 6 years ago

    THAT IS A DANGEROUS TREE!  THE BRANCHES CONTAIN A POISONOUS FLUID THAT CAN LEAD TO IMMEDIATE AND PERSISTENT CONSTIPATION.

    ALL PEOPLE IN CONTACT WITH THIS TREE SHOULD REPORT TO THEIR LOCALE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT ASAP (AFTER BURNING THEIR CLOTHES).

  9. mary615 profile image93
    mary615posted 6 years ago

    http://s1.hubimg.com/u/6072320_f248.jpg


    Hope this works this time.  What is this tree, anyone???

    1. IzzyM profile image88
      IzzyMposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I can't see it well enough to tell. It's an old tree, and its leaves look like they could be a false pepper or even a whatdoyoucallit...em...that tree that grows in subtropical climates with beautiful lilac blue flowers that droop in huge pendulums in the spring? We have a south African hubber here who has a hub about them...

      Edit: Jacaranda

      1. mary615 profile image93
        mary615posted 6 years agoin reply to this

        I was so interested in the trunk of the tree that I didn't photograph any leaves.  These triees are lined up on the street, but have no blooms.  Maybe it blooms in the spring.  It's so unusual.

        1. IzzyM profile image88
          IzzyMposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          I am seeing leaves above the white car, but maybe they belong to different trees across the street.

        2. rebekahELLE profile image87
          rebekahELLEposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          I wonder if is a Royal Poinciana? They have interesting trunk features.
          It's hard to tell without seeing the leaves. They generally bloom in late spring here in Florida.

          1. mary615 profile image93
            mary615posted 6 years agoin reply to this

            No,, I'm familiar with the Royal Poinciana.  When I go for my walk toay, I'll try and take better phots.  Thanks...

 
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