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Why do people from small families tend to be more universalistic and people from

  1. gmwilliams profile image84
    gmwilliamsposted 5 years ago

    Why do people from small families tend to be more universalistic and people from

    large families tend to be more insular?   People from small families tend to reach out to people more thus acquiring more friends while people from large families tend to only socialize within their own family circle.

  2. SidKemp profile image95
    SidKempposted 5 years ago

    I would suggest that a large family tends to create a mini-universe that people learn to negotiate. This takes time and energy. There is little incentive or need to move outside it. This is especially true if the large family is an extended family that gets along well and has many options for enjoyable relationship. Smaller families require less energy and offer fewer options, so people will tend to look outside to the wider universe.

    Oddly, the same can be true even if the child becomes a rebel or a black sheep. The rebel defines himself in opposition to the family In the large family, this can be very engaging. In the small family, the person will likely end up alone. the need for relationship increases the chance he will open to the wider universe.

    1. gmwilliams profile image84
      gmwilliamsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Good answer.   I have found that people from large families tend to be somewhat distrustful of those outside the family circle.   This can be described as clannish, the "us" vs. "them" mentality.    People from small families tend to be friendlier.

  3. Patty Inglish, MS profile image93
    Patty Inglish, MSposted 5 years ago

    In my and my friends' lives and in 20+ yrs work in psychology with 100s of families, I have found the opposite to be true -- The small families, especially single-child families, largely felt superior to society as a whole (and voiced that opinion) and held themselves separate, while the large families reached out, especially if homeschooled. The larger families socialized with others more frequently and performed volunteer work more frequently with people in need  face-to-face than did the small families, especially single-child families. People in the larger families joined clubs and group activities more often as well. However, single-parent families with one child also seemed to reach out about as often as they were insular - about half reached out and half did not.   Thanks for the question.

 
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