This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (8 posts)

Why are some people seem to be threatened by the unusual and/or different whethe

  1. gmwilliams profile image84
    gmwilliamsposted 4 years ago

    Why are some people seem to be threatened by the unusual and/or different whether it is

    ideologies, philosophies, religious beliefs, people, and/or lifestyles?

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/8113767_f260.jpg

  2. profile image0
    CalebSparksposted 4 years ago

    This is clearly a baited question, just begging for an exchange of insults and injury. It sure sounds like you are annoyed by something lol.....

  3. Express10 profile image89
    Express10posted 4 years ago

    Most humans have their own biases and prejudices which they can allow to sometimes get out of control, some much more so than others. It may be a learned behavior for some, for others it may be a way to fit into a crowd or group they desperately wish to belong to, and for a fairly large number of people, they are not open to or interested in understanding these things or people. Some become quite insulted, insulting, and even violent when they cross paths with something or someone different than what they know. These are not excuses but simply some possible reasons why some people seem threatened by the unusual or different, whatever it may be.

    1. SkySlave profile image82
      SkySlaveposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Differences threaten most people. I think its dude to a strong lack of understanding and  a fear of change.  Unfortunately, it seems to me, that so many people are afraid of stepping out of  their comfort zone and experiencing something different.

    2. gmwilliams profile image84
      gmwilliamsposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Second best answer!

    3. Express10 profile image89
      Express10posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks GMWilliams, it does seem like many of us have some bias or prejudices and most civilized interactions can't take place if we don't keep them in check and have a somewhat considerate, tolerant, or respectful mind. Fear is also a factor.

  4. profile image0
    Ghost32posted 4 years ago

    Some people are threatened by the "different" because "different" can in many cases mean "deadly".

    If we only look at (for example) one society--such as 21st century United States citizenry--the concept may not seem all that clear.  But if we take the long view, look back over the millennia of Man's sojourn on this planet, it's as clear as the nose on my wife's face before her nose job.
    Let's say you were an Arab during the time of the Crusades and saw the "different" armor of a Christian war column advancing on your village...or you were a Lakota warrior who saw the "different" bluecoats of George Armstrong Custer's 7th Cavalry charging your encampment on the Little Big Horn...or you were an African man seeing the "different" slave ships of the white man come to take you away forever through the Door of No Return...then, and in a million similar situations, you would learn (if you did not know already) that DIFFERENT was only another word for LOOK OUT!!!!
    In other words, the very survival of homo sapiens as a species has long depended on being very, very wary when something different showed up.  Different was deadly dangerous until proven otherwise.
    Personally, I still feel that way about aliens from other planets.  If an emissary from beyond the solar system drops by offering gifts, but he/she/it happens to resemble a 27-legged spider with a T-rex head and a rattlesnake tail, I'm going to consider it deadly until proven otherwise.
    Do some of us take that fear too far, to the point that the fear owns us instead of serving us by enhancing our chances for survival?  Of course we do.  It's human nature.

  5. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 4 years ago

    Conformity is normalcy for most people.
    As much as people like to proclaim they want something "different" or "new" the reality is human beings are creatures of habit.  We want to get what we (expect). Every older generation person longs for their era's traditions. Change is another word for risk or uncertainty. We don't embrace stepping out of our comfort zones.
    Last but not least people with children tend to want them to have the same life or lifestyle experiences they had as well as make similar choices with their lives.  A straight couple usually has a difficult time accepting their child is gay. A same race couple may have a difficult time accepting their child prefers to date outside of their race. A democrat household may be taken aback that their child is registered republican or vice versa. People want to (control) their environment.

 
working