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What language do you think is the hardest to learn?

  1. Alastar Packer profile image83
    Alastar Packerposted 4 years ago

    What language do you think is the hardest to learn?

  2. jaydawg808 profile image89
    jaydawg808posted 4 years ago

    From a standpoint from a foreigner, I'd say the English language is probably the hardest for them to learn.

    From my standpoint, since English is my first language, would probably be Japanese first, followed by Chinese and then Korean.  Not only do you have to know sounds and translation or words to English, you also have a character form of writing to know as well.

    1. Alastar Packer profile image83
      Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Great answer, jaydawg808. Got to agree with you on English; and Japanese, Chinese, etc. is where angels fear to tread for many so far as learning languages go.

  3. tsmog profile image82
    tsmogposted 4 years ago

    With both jest and earnest the next to be learned. I have a desire to learn Swedish, yet the hardest for learning it is simply getting started. I have the CD's and I have acquired an online learning program too. What remains is just 'next' by simply getting started . . . learning.

    1. Alastar Packer profile image83
      Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      How true about the next to be learned and just starting. The Scandinavian languages are challenging but fun...I speak a little Danish having spent some time in that country. Good going with the learning, tsmog. Tak!

    2. tsmog profile image82
      tsmogposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Very nice to see you Alastar. I am getting around slowly while remembering the articles of history you provide us. I enjoy those immensely. I do know 'Hej' means 'Hi!' That is about all I know. Speaking with a lady at the workplace I learned that. smile

    3. Alastar Packer profile image83
      Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      It's good to see you too, tsmog; and thanks, you made my day knowing you like them. Maybe the workplace lady can help some on your learning curve. You'll be speaking and writing like a Swede before you know it.smile

  4. Anita lesic profile image79
    Anita lesicposted 4 years ago

    Croatian language is the hardest wink believe me.

    1. Alastar Packer profile image83
      Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I believe you alright, Anita! How is the Croatian language different than, say, Slovenian or Czech?

  5. fpherj48 profile image76
    fpherj48posted 4 years ago

    AP....Of course I haven't attempted to study ALL languages, but other than our native tongue, I am fluent in Spanish, Italian, Latin and have a fairly decent grasp on Ukranian.
    IMHO, there is not much terribly difficult in terms of learning to AT LEAST converse and/or translate the above languages.  However, to be fair, as children we were exposed to Italian and Ukranian by our grandparents.  Over the years, you are bound to pick up enough to be able to communicate well. 

    Spanish & Latin was learned through 4 years of study.  I would be tempted to say these 2 languages are basic and simple to learn.
    My guess for the most difficult to learn would be any Far Eastern and Middle Eastern language.

      I have quite an experience when I visit the Viet Namese Salon where I have pedicures and manicures.  I will ask them to say something specific to me in Viet Namese.....and I can tell you, it seems REALLY difficult and confusing to me.  If I ask them to say something as simple as, "Hello, how are you?".....they respond with a long sentence of about 10 words......but then if I do ask them to repeat a LONG sentence.....in Viet Namese, it's about 2 words!!   I usually laugh, which makes them laugh too.  I'm sure they are laughing at me and they should!

    I can't help but think that a language other than English that has it's own alphabet, would be a double threat to learn....

    1. Alastar Packer profile image83
      Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      My gosh effer! great going with all those languages! What I've found about many of the Asian languages is they tend to think on a circular and repetitive level where we are rather linear and direct. Ones not better than the other just cultural suppos

  6. Genna East profile image90
    Genna Eastposted 4 years ago

    Hi Alastar...

    I always thought that French was more difficult than Spanish, but I understand from others that English may be the easiest to learn how to speak, but it is the most difficult to learn how to write.

    1. Alastar Packer profile image83
      Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Genna! You are so right about French. Got it in mind once to watch a bunch of French films hoping to pick up on it some, but failed miserably lol. Good point with the English. My, how it must be just to learn all different meanings for one word!

  7. liesl5858 profile image89
    liesl5858posted 4 years ago

    Try learning the Arabic language, it is quite hard.  English was taught alongside my own language which is Tagalog and I found that, it was easier to learn the English language that way. Japanese and Chinese language are hard to learn but with determination and passion, I think it is possible to learn it without finding it too hard.

    1. Alastar Packer profile image83
      Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Heavens! Just thinking about learning Arabic or Tagalog made the tummy jump lol. And yes, learning a language around speakers of it is certainly the best way. Good to hear about Japanese and Chinese, too, liesl5858!

  8. M. T. Dremer profile image94
    M. T. Dremerposted 4 years ago

    English, because it's full of irregular words. When learning a new language, there are rules wherein something can be conjugated. For example, in English we learn that, to make something past tense we add -ed to the end of the verb. And yet there are countless exceptions to this rule. Go becomes went, fly becomes flew and throw becomes threw.

    The more irregular words there are, the harder it makes it to learn for people who didn't grow up with it. Because, rather than learning the rule, they must learn countless different exceptions that make no sense. I struggled with these irregular verbs when learning Spanish, I can't imagine what someone goes through when trying to learn English.

    1. Alastar Packer profile image83
      Alastar Packerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Absolutely, M.T., it sure is. You've expressed exactly my thoughts on how tough English can be for non-speakers. Maybe a good question would be "What is the easiest language to learn?" Spanish would probably make the list for many.

  9. lingvopedia profile image60
    lingvopediaposted 4 years ago

    I thought that German was difficult than Spanish.

 
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