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jump to last post 1-11 of 11 discussions (30 posts)

What is first to bloom in your area? Here it is the daffodils, then the Bradford

  1. Faith Reaper profile image87
    Faith Reaperposted 3 years ago

    What is first to bloom in your area? Here it is the daffodils, then the Bradford Pear trees then

    Where I live the first to always seem to pop out of the frozen earth are the daffodils, then the Bradford Pear trees, forsythia and then come the peach orchards in bloom.  What plants or flowers bloom first where you live?  Thank you for answering.

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/12280354_f260.jpg

  2. B. Leekley profile image93
    B. Leekleyposted 3 years ago

    Here in Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA, the crocuses bloom first and then the daffodils. Same where I grew up in the northeast corner of Illinois. That is regarding home flower garden flowers. I don't know what wildflowers bloom first.

    1. Faith Reaper profile image87
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Brian, Thank you for answering. Yes, it seems the daffodils are in a hurry to bloom even when it is not quite warm enough. I am not sure about wildflowers either.

  3. Jackie Lynnley profile image88
    Jackie Lynnleyposted 3 years ago

    The Helleborus is probably the first bloom I saw this year which is a gorgeous little flower but the Easter Lily and Daffodil are always just a breath away!
    We had 81 today. Was still too weak to go out and enjoy it but I stood in it for a few minutes a few times! Can't wait to be well!

    1. Faith Reaper profile image87
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Oh, I bet it is gorgeous. Yes, it was beautiful, sunny and warm here too. I know you can't wait but healing is most important now. Maybe you can sit out in the sun a bit each day.

  4. Kathleen Cochran profile image82
    Kathleen Cochranposted 3 years ago

    Metro Atlanta we get crocus first, then daffodils, then pears and redbuds, then forsythia.  And we have them all now.  Finally think we might - might - be done with winter.  And compared to the NE, we got off easy!

    1. Faith Reaper profile image87
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Kathleen, That sounds about just like here but I just happened to not have seen the crocus yet. I think we are done with winter and, yes, we certainly got off easy! Thank you for answering.

  5. naturegirl7 profile image89
    naturegirl7posted 3 years ago

    Way down here in Southeastern Louisiana the Taiwan cherry trees and wild blueberries (aka Huckleberries, Vaccinium species) are the first to bloom. This year the cherry blossoms opened in late January. The bulbs including snowbells, daffodils and other narcissus follow.

    1. Faith Reaper profile image87
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Yvonne, Oh, I love cherry trees! I had forgotten about the snowballs but I have not seen any here yet. Thank you for answering.

  6. Lady Guinevere profile image59
    Lady Guinevereposted 3 years ago

    The frist to pop it's heads out of the cold ground here are the hyacinths and daffodils.  The frist to bloom are the Bradford Pears and we have a few in the forest around us and it makes my eyes gluey and I am allergic to them.  They wreck havoc with my vision too.  They are pretty but I hate them.

    1. Faith Reaper profile image87
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Debra, Oh, I am so sorry about your allergies.  Sounds like about all are having the same in bloom right now no matter where they live, interesting.

    2. Lady Guinevere profile image59
      Lady Guinevereposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes. they all seem t be coming out at the same time.  I think it is the sun or amount of light and not so much the air temps or water, i.e. rain, snow, ice or sleet.

    3. Faith Reaper profile image87
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I think you're right.  They are all coming out now. So beautiful!

  7. Genna East profile image88
    Genna Eastposted 3 years ago

    Hi Theresa…

    Spring is still a bit frozen out for us in New England, but we still forward to the daffs and peepers to find their way to us.

    1. Faith Reaper profile image87
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Genna, Oh, poor dear, I know you are all tired of the frozen!  Hope it melts soon and you see some color.  Blessings

  8. The Examiner-1 profile image72
    The Examiner-1posted 3 years ago

    Dandelions. Then they die as fast as they appeared and blow all over.
    After they are done I believe the next thing is forsythia.

    1. Faith Reaper profile image87
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Kevin,

      Thank you so much.  Yes, they do not last long.  The forsythia seems to be everywhere.

    2. The Examiner-1 profile image72
      The Examiner-1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Which one does not last long? The dandelion is short lived but it 'blows' away when it dies and starts new ones. It keeps coming and going I forget how many times.

    3. Faith Reaper profile image87
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      The dandelion will blow away as you stated but it does come back!

    4. The Examiner-1 profile image72
      The Examiner-1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      It blows away again and when it blows away it goes into someone elses yard. Then you get blamed.

    5. Faith Reaper profile image87
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      LOL, yes, it does do that ... some do consider it a weed, but it actually has some good benefits that I read of once in a hub somewhere.

    6. The Examiner-1 profile image72
      The Examiner-1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      My brother mows my lawn and only the front. The back is full of trees, etc., cannot be mowed. Otherwise I would do it before they died and maybe save them for the benefits.

    7. Faith Reaper profile image87
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Maybe you can mention it to your brother and see if he will try to save some?

    8. The Examiner-1 profile image72
      The Examiner-1posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I doubt it. To him they are weeds and he wants to get the job done.

    9. Faith Reaper profile image87
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Oh, LOL,  ... well, I'm sorry.

  9. MizBejabbers profile image92
    MizBejabbersposted 3 years ago

    The crocuses bloomed six weeks ago. Right now in central Arkansas our daffodils, jonquils and forsythias are blooming. The Bradford pears are starting to bloom but they aren't fully in bloom yet. The redbuds haven't tried to make their debut nor have early blooming tulips. I haven't checked on my hyacinths, but they should be next.

    1. Faith Reaper profile image87
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi MizB,  Thanks for answering.  That is so interesting that everywhere it seems all the same plants and flowers are in bloom.  Yes, they could be next!

  10. Sparklea profile image74
    Sparkleaposted 3 years ago

    Hi Faith,
    Usually crocus and snowdrops...but it is 16 degrees here tonight and we still have snow on the ground...very cold today, 30 degrees, cold wind!

    After the snowdrops, hyacinth, grape hyacinth, and primrose...forsythia comes behind and our neighbor has a beautiful pussy willow bush...I love to pet them!!!  What a miracle to see growing fur!  God is such an artist!

    We have two flowering crab apples in our front yard, and they smell beautiful...lilacs in May, smell heavenly on my morning walks!

    Not a robin in sight so far!  I am listening for them but so far, silence...I always get so excited when I see my first robin!

    I love your questions...God bless, and I continue to pray for your family!  Sparklea smile  PS: I LOVE the Johnny jump-ups too and the larger pansies!

    1. Faith Reaper profile image87
      Faith Reaperposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Sparklea, I know you are looking forward to all of the wonderful blooming plants and flowers you have mentioned.  I can't image snow still on the ground!  Brrr.  It has been so warm, sunny and beautiful here. I hope you see a robin soon. God bless

  11. lawrence01 profile image81
    lawrence01posted 3 years ago

    The first thing I notice is the cherry blossoms the trees flower, a bright pink . When the other trees are just budding and the daffodils are just poking through to see the pink against a clear blue sky is amazing.

 
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