With the state of public schools the way they are in the United States, do you f

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  1. gmwilliams profile image85
    gmwilliamsposted 2 years ago

    With the state of public schools the way they are in the United States, do you feel that corporal

    punishment should be reinstituted in our public schools to discipline bad, incorrigible students?  Why?  Why not?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/7507070_f260.jpg

  2. Wesman Todd Shaw profile image97
    Wesman Todd Shawposted 2 years ago

    'Progressivism' is the disease that brought us all of this 'political correctness.'  You know what I mean, everyone must be coddled, no one should ever be offended, and everyone deserves a trophy.

    This stuff is foul in many many ways, and worse, is based in Marxism. 

    Our public schools are among the worst in the civilized world. It is plain they're failing the children. Surely going back to things that did work isn't a bad idea.

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Exactly, the use of stringent discipline including corporal punishment will get the more incorrigible students in line.  When there was corporal punishment in public schools, children BEHAVED!

  3. TessSchlesinger profile image94
    TessSchlesingerposted 2 years ago

    I find it interesting that when I went to school, we were all well behaved. Quite honestly, for the most part, I don't think it occurred to anyone to misbehave.

    We had systems of discipline - detention, bad marks, and expulsion.

    I don't think it's the lack of corporal punishment that is causing the 'rebelliousness.' I think it's societal values. Not sure how I would define the major differences, though.

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      You attend private schools where the students were affluent.They appreciated the value of education & discipline.It isn't that way w/poor students in public schools Short of expulsion, the only remedy for the latter is corporal punishment.

    2. TessSchlesinger profile image94
      TessSchlesingerposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      My early school years was government, and my sister attended government schools. My brother and I went to private schools. Same discipline.

  4. ronbergeron profile image84
    ronbergeronposted 2 years ago

    I don't believe in corporal punishment in the school system. However, I do believe that parents should back up the teachers and should provide whatever discipline is needed in the home so the students are respectful of their teachers, fellow students, and themselves while in class.

    Students with behavioural problems should not be allowed to disrupt classrooms and prevent the students who want to learn from getting an education.

    1. profile image0
      LoliHeyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Nowadays the parents will come up to the school and cuss the teacher and the administration out.  They believe anything their little angel tells them.

    2. ronbergeron profile image84
      ronbergeronposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I agree. That's the biggest part of the problem. What do you think they'll do if the teacher hits their kid?

  5. Dean Traylor profile image96
    Dean Traylorposted 2 years ago

    I wrote a hub about "yellers." They are teachers who tend to scream and yell at students at the slightest infraction. In a sense, they are extremely ineffective and lack a very important tool in teaching: control. Also, they are the ones who tend to bemoan the ban of any corporal punishment.
    In a sense, there are so many measures a teacher can take in class, in which he/she can set the tone and mood in the class and not have to resort to such punitive actions.
    One of the best teachers I know was a former police officer from Phoenix. He usually sets the tone early by getting to know the students and establishing the boundaries early on. He rarely write referrals and many hardcore students tend to seek his guidance. He never considered corporal punishment, because it's unnecessary .
    Corporal punishment doesn't make you look tough in front of the students. It has the opposite effect It's merely a weak quick-fix to an ongoing problem of establishing control and discipline in the classroom. Additionally, those that have used it (despite being illegal) lacked any control and received negative reactions from the students -- in others words, they're the ones that have lost the students and have inadvertently became ineffective as teachers.

    1. profile image0
      LoliHeyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Are you a teacher?  Have you ever taught in an inner city classroom?

    2. Dean Traylor profile image96
      Dean Traylorposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Yes. And I taught in an inner city classroom for 15 years. Also subbed in Compton unified 21 years ago. And my parents taught there for 30 years, too.

    3. profile image0
      LoliHeyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Actually, I read your hub on the Yellers.  I looked it up after I posted the comment.  Very good hub--you did an excellent job describing that kind of teacher.  I've been there myself.

  6. tamarawilhite profile image92
    tamarawilhiteposted 2 years ago

    Would swatting younger kids getting out of control help them? Yes.
    Would it be appropriate with teenagers? Some of them would get more out of it than being sent to detention for a month.
    But part of the problem is simply tolerating misbehavior in kids who can say they are under-privileged, instead of clamping down on it.
    Mainstreaming children with learning disorders who cannot function in a mainstream class contributes to the problem, since there is the hope normal kids learn compassion for the slower/disabled ones and disabled learn more by being with normal ones. Instead, the disabled one melts down / needs help, and other kids can act out because the teacher is busy with the kid who needs to be elsewhere to be properly served.

    1. TessSchlesinger profile image94
      TessSchlesingerposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      You have good points.

 
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