Many Many Little Tiny People (and Cows) are Causing Global Warming.

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  1. Kathryn L Hill profile image77
    Kathryn L Hillposted 13 months ago

    The earth is so huge. And people are so small. Are we really contributing to the build-up of C02 in the upper atmosphere(s) by:
    1. Burning fossil fuels,
    2. Cutting down forests
    3. Farming livestock.

    https://news.climate.columbia.edu/2021/ … l-warming/

    "Fossil fuels produce large quantities of carbon dioxide  w h e n   b u r n e d.

    Carbon emissions trap heat in the atmosphere and lead to climate change. In the United States, the burning of fossil fuels, particularly for the power and transportation sectors, accounts for about three-quarters of our carbon emissions."
    FROM:
    https://www.nrdc.org/stories/fossil-fue … sec-whatis

    1. lovetherain profile image80
      lovetherainposted 13 months agoin reply to this

      What I think. I don't think we can do any serious, permanent damage. We were created as we are, immature, destructive, irresponsible. We are child-like. That leads to the assumption that children grow up eventually. I think we are prevented from doing serious damage (like full out nuclear war etc.) A parent might let their child have a messy room, but will draw the line at more destructive behaviour such as hard drugs.

      Things aren't accidental. They are created. They follow the rules of the universe and nature.

      We are here to learn lessons, like how not to shit in our own back yards,

      This also means there will probably be repercussions fo your behaviour.

      1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
        Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

        Okay, in that case does not our observations taught us any lesson to move to maturity?                                    Some persons are still opening defecating on the earth or back yard! This question the mental balance of sure persons. Actually, it's free will being played.

        1. lovetherain profile image80
          lovetherainposted 13 months agoin reply to this

          Yes.

          1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
            Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

            Then, then we human being are to be blamed in contribving to the negative Carbon Dioxide Effects.                                   @Kathryn L Hill: I would execused every beast, bird, insect, reptile, dead or alive for negatively polluting mother earth. So are rotten and rotting vegetations.                                     These later group can't help matter, as they don't have free will.

            1. lovetherain profile image80
              lovetherainposted 13 months agoin reply to this

              I haven't studied it, but I suppose it is possible. We are destructive. But climate change is also a normal regular cycle in our world.

              1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
                Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

                Yes to your later thoughts.

    2. peterstreep profile image79
      peterstreepposted 13 months agoin reply to this

      The earth is so huge. And people are so small. But the ecosystem is fragile and we are with many.
      Facts:
      1. We live in a climate crisis.
      2. Humans are the cause.
      ---
      Problem: How to solve it. -

      1. Work and think on an international scale.
      2. See it as a crisis bigger than COVID. And take actions on a drastic scale.

      Problems:
      Worldwide there are lots of different political point of views. These have to come to a consensus. There are also lot's of big money cooperations that have a lot to lose.
      These and a lot of practicalities make us as a rabbit frozen by the headlights of a coming car, unable to move. The car passes, leaving a dead rabbit.

      1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
        Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

        peterstreep, welcome to the discussion. You and me have a common view point, as if you're speaking my mind.

        1. peterstreep profile image79
          peterstreepposted 13 months agoin reply to this

          Thanks Miebakagh57,

          it's a hell of of problem, and I hope we can solve the problem together, but there isn't much time left to do something before we've crossed the red line of no return.

          1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
            Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

            Thank you. But we can lay the foundation for the future generations to carry through.

      2. lovetherain profile image80
        lovetherainposted 13 months agoin reply to this

        It is not the fault of humans, we are a small part of the ecosystem. These things go in cycles. It's natural for the climate to change.

        1. peterstreep profile image79
          peterstreepposted 13 months agoin reply to this

          Not in this case.
          We are to blame and we have to face it, not looking for excuses.
          We live with almost 8 billion people on this earth. And we have to eat, drink, and get rid of our waste
          On the weather charts, you can see the smog warnings, the CO in the air, the industrial ozone pollution. PM2.5 particles. etc.
          The meat industry is enormous. And every minute the size of a football pitch of the Amazon rainforest is destroyed.
          Microplastics made by tires running every day over the streets are an enormous problem. Where do you think those particles of worn-out tires go? Plastic bottles and bags. Electronic waste, oil spills, water pollution,  I can go on...
          It's hard to face reality, but that's what it is.
          We, humans, are responsible for this mess, and we are the only ones to solve it.

          1. lovetherain profile image80
            lovetherainposted 13 months agoin reply to this

            We destroy and make messes, we need to grow up. But it has very little or nothing to do with climate change. They are separate issues.

            1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
              Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

              lovetherain, you misunderstand, or you should do a rethinking.                                             These human messes(especially purposeful and industrial destruction of the ecosystem rend the earth's atmosphere.                                          So I agree if I correctly understand you that we can't do anything about the extra hot gases coming out of the Big Hole, and hitting our earth hard, even at night. But as Nathanville said, some good things can be done to stop extra hydro carbon emissions to destroy the ozone layer.

              1. lovetherain profile image80
                lovetherainposted 13 months agoin reply to this

                You are the one who needs to do the rethinking. Or you can keep being a sheep and listening to everything you are told in the media. Do your own research.

                1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
                  Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

                  lovetherain, thank you.                                                     Yes, I like doing a rethinking and researching.                                                                       We humans have massed up our ecosystem, right?                                                   And this has contribute to climate changes, right?                                                For example, the felling of forests without adequate replacement, right? Smog or burning  of fosil fuel? So, where do we go from here? Thanks again.

            2. peterstreep profile image79
              peterstreepposted 13 months agoin reply to this

              What would convince you that the climate crisis of today is caused by human behaviour?

              1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
                Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

                I would love to give an answer in a word or two, had the question not been specific directed to lovetherain. Thanks.

              2. peterstreep profile image79
                peterstreepposted 13 months agoin reply to this

                Apparently, this question was too confrontational. As for accepting that the climate crisis is caused by humans you have to accept the responsibility. And we don't want that, do we?
                Better hide our heads in the sand. Funny thing is that the same people who try to belittle the climate crisis also belittled the effects of smoking on your health.

                1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
                  Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

                  Peterstrep, you speak the truth. Thank you.

          2. Miebakagh57 profile image66
            Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

            peterstreep, I agree with you. I'm afraid we've meat a conspiracy theorist.

    3. abwilliams profile image67
      abwilliamsposted 13 months agoin reply to this

      Kathryn, it IS every bit as crazy, as your title suggests it is, but not funny in the least...as your title is, to me. smile

      1. Kathryn L Hill profile image77
        Kathryn L Hillposted 13 months agoin reply to this

        I think the weather reflects the people.
        We are burning up inside with all of our hot, angry emotions. We are burning up the planet and the atmosphere. We need to cool down.
        As within, without.



        We need to thank the Great Spirit for Nature and Respect what has been miraculously created and exists every day before our very eyes.

        And whoever is greedy and working  a g a i n s t  Mother Nature,
        well, she will "box their ears."
        ... and we will all suffer for it.

        1. abwilliams profile image67
          abwilliamsposted 13 months agoin reply to this

          Yes, we need a collective inhale & exhale; so that we might breathe in and take in, the wonder of this miraculous, marvelous place, planet Earth.

          1. Kathryn L Hill profile image77
            Kathryn L Hillposted 13 months agoin reply to this

            smile

        2. Miebakagh57 profile image66
          Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

          Great insight!

  2. Kathryn L Hill profile image77
    Kathryn L Hillposted 13 months ago

    What is increasing the concentrations of gases in the atmosphere?

    1. Carbon dioxide (CO2): 
       A. burning of fossil fuels
       B. coal
       C. natural gas 
       D. oil/ gasoline.

    2. Methane:
       A. rotting plants
       B. burping/farting cows,
       C. natural seeps from fossil fuels
       D. leaks from natural gas
       E. coal mining operations

    3. Nitrous oxide:
        A. coal-fired power plants. 

    4. Fluorinated gases:
       A. hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs),
       B. perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and
       C. sulphur hexafluoride (SF6))
       D. Gas leakage throughout the manufacturing and life of:
          1. refrigerators
          2. air-conditioners
          3. foams
          4. aerosol cans
       E. Gas leakage during the manufacturing of:
          1. metals and
          2. semiconductors.

    https://ec.europa.eu/clima/change/causes_en

  3. Kathryn L Hill profile image77
    Kathryn L Hillposted 13 months ago

    List of common semiconductor devices
    DIAC
    Diode (rectifier diode)
    Gunn diode
    IMPATT diode
    Laser diode
    Light-emitting diode (LED)
    Photocell
    Phototransistor
    PIN diode
    Schottky diode
    Solar cell
    Transient-voltage-suppression diode
    Tunnel diode
    VCSEL
    Zener diode
    Zen diode
    Three-terminal devices:

    Bipolar transistor
    Darlington transistor
    Field-effect transistor
    Insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT)
    Silicon-controlled rectifier
    Thyristor
    TRIAC
    Unijunction transistor
    Four-terminal devices:

    Hall effect sensor (magnetic field sensor)
    Photocoupler (Optocoupler)

    1. Castlepaloma profile image73
      Castlepalomaposted 13 months agoin reply to this

      Don't worry.
      The wealthy, media and Government will be creating another lockdown for the environment soon to come, much like the covid crisis.

      Love the way billionaires and trillionaires come to be our saviours.

      The rest of us are not worthy of abilities, thought nor Creation.lol.

      1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
        Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

        Castlepaloma? Castlepaloma again! Well meet.

      2. abwilliams profile image67
        abwilliamsposted 13 months agoin reply to this

        So true Castle, we need to be focused on the patterns of the rich, the powerful, the Government...those seeking ways in which to continually manipulate and control the populace, rather than the weather patterns which have existed since the dawn of time.

  4. Kathryn L Hill profile image77
    Kathryn L Hillposted 13 months ago

    I wonder what the earth will be like when our youngest children are in their 80's?
    - as it is, or ... ?

    1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
      Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

      Kathryn, I'm not a earth or atmospheric scientist or professing an expertise of these sciences.                                             My basic understanding is undoubtly foundational.                                       Seriously, what I call the Carbon Emitting Effect has done much unwelcome demage to both the earth and the atmospher. The firrt sign the scientists began to notice was a Big Hole in the atmospher. So those harmful gas man and beasts released, and  unnatural burning of forests are sent back to the earth, and effect global warning. Scientist says these effects contribute to the polar ice melting.                               That said, I think a shift in the position of the earth is hardly noticeable. But is seriously affecting agricutural life.                                   More so, much changes in the growth of marine life, and earthly animals and birds like pigmy growth are are seen.                                       I don't have to worry about how the earth will be in 80...

  5. Miebakagh57 profile image66
    Miebakagh57posted 13 months ago

    ...years time. I'll not be around for them to tell me. That means I would at present take a time travel to the Andromeda Galaxy. Imagine how many light years it would take me to shot of to reach or pass the Milky Way? How long then to the Androdeda?

  6. Kathryn L Hill profile image77
    Kathryn L Hillposted 13 months ago

    I agree, we need to learn respect.
    We need to respect science.
    But, we need to have priorities, such as, when to use our scientific discoveries/inventions and when not to.

    If something we have invented is found to be bad for the earth, then we should stop using it. For instance, if it is gasoline, then we need to stop using gasoline and go back to horse and buggy. If it is electronic manufacture, we should stop manufacturing all electrical things and go back to candles and word of mouth. If it is the use of coal, well, we should certainly stop looking for coal and using coal. Again, candles are pretty cool and burning them does not create gas emissions. If people, cows and rotting plants are producing yucky gasses (methane) that rise and create the green house effect in the upper atmosphere, by all means, stop eating red meat and throwing salads into the trash. For instance, in certain areas in Europe, where they eat fewer steak dinners and hamburgers these days, there are less cattle farms. In these areas, the air is less full of methane. As far as rotting plants, we should stop allowing plants to rot. How come plants are rotting when pigs and goats would love to eat them?

    I mean, really! Is it so hard to do without modern conveniences such as refrigerators? Just don't buy so much food at one time! Use ice-chests! or ice-boxes like in our (great) grandmothers day! Do we really need to use so much foam? We can certainly go back to wooden furniture. We can figure out how to make foamless beds, chairs and car seats. And air conditioning? How spoiled are we? Humans have gotten along without refrigeration for eons of time.
    Good grief.

    1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
      Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

      We're time traveling back to the pre-Industrial Revolution era! Then another time travel back to back to 50 years ago. That's it!

    2. MizBejabbers profile image87
      MizBejabbersposted 13 months agoin reply to this

      "Humans have gotten along without refrigeration for eons of time."

      While that is a very true statement, Katheryn, these people you mentioned and even my peers and I in our earlier years, didn't have to live in a world that was so polluted and with a big hole in the atmosphere that is letting in a hotter version of sunlight. As kids we didn't have to use spf 30 to 100 sunscreen on our bodies to go swimming. Our world is air frying us alive.

      Please don't get me wrong, I do believe that there are cycles in this world and we are in one of the hostile ones right now. But I also believe that humankind is contributing to this natural cycle and exacerbating it. what percentage humans are adding, I don't know, and even scientists can't agree on it to enlighten us.

  7. Kathryn L Hill profile image77
    Kathryn L Hillposted 13 months ago

    It would be very interesting to see the effects of living off the grid, (for about a half a decade,) in a very strict fashion. Like, Amish style. Would there still be global warming? Perhaps.
    But, on a gut level, I think it, (the amount of warming,) would be (much?) less.

    1. lovetherain profile image80
      lovetherainposted 13 months agoin reply to this

      Star fort technology would probably be the best option.

    2. MizBejabbers profile image87
      MizBejabbersposted 13 months agoin reply to this

      I guess I'll find out, or at least I hope I live long enough to find out. My son is building an underground house on 30 acres with a nice creek in the middle of his acres near Tyler, TX. He and his wife are living off the grid in a tiny house right now while their house is being built. They plan to continue to live off the grid in the new home when it is completed. It should have been finished by now. I'm not sure what the holdup is, but I think it has to do with obtaining some of the materials. Covid has slowed down their progress also. Fortunately, they've escaped having covid themselves.
      They've never been keen on a lot of AC or even heat for that matter, so I very seldom visit them. I've already told them that I'll continue to visit only in moderate weather. lol

  8. Nathanville profile image93
    Nathanvilleposted 13 months ago

    A big topic, and whether we are doing enough to divert major climate disaster remains to be seen, but in seeing our own ‘Conservative’ (Capitalist) Government, who’s are not naturally green by nature, since 2012 (The ‘UK Climate Change Risk Assessment’: 2012 Report) being committed to tackling ‘Climate Change’, and to take big steps in doing so has given me optimism.

    In December last year  the UK Government announced their ‘Ten Point Plan’ for the next decade, which sets out the government’s approach to ‘Build Back Better’, support green jobs, and accelerate the UK’s path to net zero carbon emissions by 2050.

    The UK Government’s ambitious 10 point plan includes:-

    •    Advancing offshore wind farms further so that by 2030 there will be enough energy generated from offshore wind power to supply every domestic home in the UK.

    •    Driving the growth of low carbon hydrogen (Green Hydrogen), with the ambitious plan to switch from ‘natural gas’ for heating British homes in the winter to green hydrogen by 2030.

    •    Accelerating the shift to zero emission vehicles (electric cars) e.g. the banning of fossil fuel cars by 2030.

    •    Green public transport, cycling and walking e.g. the switch from diesel buses to buses using green gases; which has already been done in many cities across Britain, including Bristol where our busses already run on green gas made from Bristol sewage and domestic food waste, and Aberdeen where their busses already run on green gas (green hydrogen) made from sea water.  And the UK is one of just three countries in the world (UK, Germany and China) who are commercially developing hydrogen trains that run on green hydrogen.

    •    ‘Jet zero’ and green ships; R&D for electric passenger planes is in its early stages of development; but Scotland is at an advanced stage of developing ships that use green hydrogen, rather than fossil fuels for their power.

    •    Greener buildings.  Challenging as old housing stock in the UK do not meet current standards for energy efficiency; great strides have been made e.g. I had our cavity walls insulated for free (on Government Grant), but the Government has a long way to go yet.

    •    Investing in carbon capture, usage and storage; all part of ongoing R&D (Research & Development).

    •    Protecting our natural environment:  Something which governments in the UK, and across Europe, have been doing for decades; so it’s just a continuation of what’s already being done.

    •    Green finance and innovation:  The Government is ending the £10 billion ($14 billion) it paid to the fossil fuel and instead will pay £12 billion ($17 billion) subsidies (government investment) in the Renewable Energy Sector to create and support up to 250,000 green jobs in the UK.

    Also, in November the UK Government will be hosting COP26 (2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference); perhaps better known by many as the COP21 (Paris Agreement) in 2015.

    With Joe Biden having re-signed the Paris Agreement for the USA, this November’s meeting of COP should prove interesting:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2021_Unit … Conference

    1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
      Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

      Nathanville, thank you again for reminding me of these discourse.                                 You, me, and CHRISS57 has discuss the safe or green energy matter in  How do you think your goveroent is... But it relates well here. Thank you.

    2. peterstreep profile image79
      peterstreepposted 13 months agoin reply to this

      It's tough Nathan,
      We slowly start to recognize the problem in the west. But still, money is more important than a sustainable economy. As most governments around the world use a growth economy instead of a sustainable one (like the doughnut model for instance)
      Brazil has a terrible government that has no problem with destroying the Amazon. As people still love to go to McDonald's and buy hamburgers for ridiculously low prices.
      The tons of water and soy needed for a hamburger is straining the reserves of the earth. The number of water bottles used and other plastics that dissolve into microplastics, ending up in our bodies.
      We are still a long way of. Locally perhaps there are some success stories, but this is a world problem like COVID (even worse!) and needs drastic world measures. (like COVID) And a lot of people won't like these rules and laws that have to be made to save a livable environment.
      Keep wearing your mask as for air pollution is not a bad idea, as Ken was talking about in another post topic... (but that's not a sollution but a plaster on the wound)

      1. Nathanville profile image93
        Nathanvilleposted 13 months agoin reply to this

        Yep, it’s like any struggle, it’s a fight all the way, but you’ve got to remain positive if you want any chance of winning; just like the Trade Union movement in Britain in its early days when it was illegal and membership often meant the death penalty; and just like the suffragettes and the persecution they faced.  But in the end, in both cases, their numbers and support grew; so today we have ‘Labour Protection’ Laws in the UK protecting workers rights, and women have equal rights.
           
        COP21 (Paris Agreement) did make a difference around the world; so five years on, can COP26 (in the UK in November) build on that; especially now that the USA is back on board?

        1. peterstreep profile image79
          peterstreepposted 13 months agoin reply to this

          True, you have to stay positive. But the more you look at the reality it harder it becomes.
          One hand is signing the Paris agreement, the other giving away contracts to the fosil industry for billions of euro's.
          In a way I have more confidence in entrepeneurs like Elon Musk with his philosophy of making products that are energy friendly and that are wanted by every one, like a sexy electric car. Than somebody acting like a doctor saying that you have to take a coughing syrope with a horrible taste, saying.."But it is good for you." If you understand what I mean.

          It is sad though to have more trust in capitalism to solve the problem than governments.. As I don't trust capitalism at all as it brought us in the mess we are today in the first place.  And the biggest thing to reduce the climate crisis is probably to stop this economic growth idea. And instead build a society on an economy that is self sustaining like the donought model.
          And you can have electric cars, but if the energy generated for the electric cars isn't clean, those cars don't mean a thing.

          Here in Spain there are plans for thousands of solar farms. Not to make it a better world, but with profit as a motive. A sad thing, but perhaps that's the way it will go. People won't go eco because it's better for the planet but because it's the way to make money and get huge subsidies from the EU and governments.

          But if that's the way to go, so it is. Governments giving subsidies to green energy instead of fosil fuels. There will always be greed, but perhaps it's the trick to direct the greed into the green direction...

          1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
            Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

            Sad but true. But government all over the world at most times lack the will to implement its green initiatives. Greed and bribery is factoring in this.

          2. Nathanville profile image93
            Nathanvilleposted 13 months agoin reply to this

            What you say is fitting if one views the ‘glass as being half empty’; which can be defeatist e.g. China burns more coal than the rest of the world put together.

            Whereas, I prefer to view the ‘glass as being half full’; encouragement e.g. China installed more wind-turbines last year than the whole of the rest of the world put together.

            Actually, on this issue, I do have more trust in Governments than in Capitalism in solving this problem in that, as we’ve seen in the USA during the Trump years, without push by Governments, Industrialists are slow in making the necessary changes.

            Another example is the UK Government has announced that it will ban all fossil fuel cars by 2030:  So all the UK car manufacturers are now rapidly switching to making electric cars rather than fossil fuel cars; something they wouldn’t have done on their own if the Government hadn’t made the announcement.

            Reducing the climate crisis and maintaining economic growth are mutually feasible, as we are beginning to see in the UK e.g. making homes more energy efficient, so that we use less energy while maintaining the same living standards; converting all transport (public and private) to electricity or green (Renewable) gas; and phasing out the use of fossil fuel and replacing it with Renewable Energy; plus carbon capture technologies e.g. planting more trees etc.  All of these require Government Strategy and Policy, and in countries across the world you do see this happening.  The big plus factor for economic growth, is that the Renewable Energy Sector is generating a lot of Investment, wealth, employment and economic growth.

            As regards subsidies, that is mainly for R&D (Research and Development), which is always the most expensive and riskiest part of the process; but equally, such R&D (at least in the UK) is also attracting a lot of investment from the Private Sector because to be one of the first during the Development stage for successful projects pays dividends.  That’s why Scotland’s Government’s R&D into Green Hydrogen is attracting a lot of investment from Private Industry, because once it’s developed it’s an industry that’s going to be worth $trillions.

            Yep, it’s a valid point that having electric cars is pointless unless the electricity that charges them is from Renewable Sources and not fossil fuels.  And that’s the whole point that China, Europe, UK and many other countries are working towards e.g. in the UK, every month that passes more and more of our electricity is from Renewable Sources.  Currently 50% of the electricity I use in Bristol, which I buy from Bristol Energy, is from Renewable Sources; and that is set to increase over time.

            Aside from my last comment, I am currently in the process of getting solar panels and battery installed; so within the next few months I will be virtually self-sufficient during the summer months, and will only need to buy some electricity from the National Grid during the winter months; albeit, any surplus energy that I don’t use will be sold to the National Grid at wholesale prices (as clean, green, renewable energy, for someone else to benefit from).

            Yep, the offshore windfarms in the UK are privately owned, as a business adventure to make profit for the Company; it’s only in Communist Countries like China where such projects will be wholly government financed and owned.  However, for the past few years solar and wind have become cheaper forms of energy than fossil fuels (even without government subsidies) so yes it has become a profitable adventure; a win win for all.

            1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
              Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

              Thank you for such straight forward information.                                        These countries the United Kingdom, Europe, and China are highly commendable for others to copy.                                     Significantly, other countries of the world should also set their target dates to eliminate hydrocarbon or fossil fuel by a certain date around 2030.                            Otherwise, air pollution eg smog from can affect neighboring countries.

    3. Miebakagh57 profile image66
      Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

      As an African, I marvel that such technology has been going on in Europe.

      1. Nathanville profile image93
        Nathanvilleposted 13 months agoin reply to this

        It must be frustrating to live in a country where such modern technology seems so far away.

        1. Kathryn L Hill profile image77
          Kathryn L Hillposted 13 months agoin reply to this

          My MY ... That is an interesting comment!

        2. Miebakagh57 profile image66
          Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

          That's very frustating indeed. For four days and nights this week, I don't have electricity in my town. Very frustratiog indeed.

          1. Nathanville profile image93
            Nathanvilleposted 13 months agoin reply to this

            Wow, that's awful; that means that even basic things like fridges and freezers can't be much use if you keep losing power.

            1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
              Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

              Arthur, you said fridges and freezer? What about fans, air-conditioners, ironing, TV and phones?                                               For the past four days of none availability of power, I've to power my phone at a younder barbering saloon where I was a regular client. Otherwise, I can't communicate online. Thanks.

              1. Nathanville profile image93
                Nathanvilleposted 13 months agoin reply to this

                Yep, you're right; no regular power would have a massive negative impact in this day and age.

                1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
                  Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

                  Thank you. The challenge with my country is that the politicians has no better mindset in advocating a sufficient and regular electricity supply.                                         And about green energy or electricity, I don't think  my country Nigeria has any blue print in the foundation.                                      Wastes from households and markets are either burnt or dumb into the seas and rivers, that's destroying marine life at the precinct of the water  Fronts.                                       That said,  Nigeria, has no plan to convert these wastes and others e.g. faece into green energy.

                  1. Nathanville profile image93
                    Nathanvilleposted 13 months agoin reply to this

                    That is awful, and so frustrating; it's sad to see such governments so irresponsible.  I just hope that one day things will change for the better in Nigeria.

              2. MizBejabbers profile image87
                MizBejabbersposted 13 months agoin reply to this

                Miebakagh, we have a tiny solar array (3 panels and a storage battery for each) that we use to charge our phones and tablets and run one 60W light bulb when we have a power outage. The panels cost less than $200 when we bought them, and we acquired the batteries one at a time. My husband is a digital engineer and then learned broadcast engineering and there isn't much he doesn't know about energy. If anything happened to him, I probably wouldn't learn how to keep the rig running, but right now we are fortunate that he can. At one time I had the interest, but not now.
                What we really need is a generator.

                1. Nathanville profile image93
                  Nathanvilleposted 13 months agoin reply to this

                  HI Mizbejabbers; I assume from your comments that power outages are common where you live?

                  1. tsmog profile image78
                    tsmogposted 13 months agoin reply to this

                    I don't know about Mizbejabbers, but here in the San Diego County of Southern California where summer temperatures can easily hoover at 90ºF+ (32ºC) during summer we have several rolling brown outs, yet they are regional not affecting the greater San Diego County.

                    I have not experienced one as yet, though they occur in some areas of the county.. A brown out is different than a black out. (See link below). However, the electrical utility will also shut off electricity to areas due to threat of the wildfires during extreme heat and the environmental dryness of plant life with the threat of utility power line's sparking them, which is costly since they will be sued.

                    Brown out vs. Black out
                    https://www.directenergy.com/learning-c … t-brownout

                  2. MizBejabbers profile image87
                    MizBejabbersposted 13 months agoin reply to this

                    Yes, Nathanville, very frequent. We live in the county just outside of town, so I think it is just the electrical system in our area. My friends in town don't seen to experience as many of these outages. The longest one we've experienced this year was about 20 hours long. They are always from unpreventable occurrences such as storms, "human damage" (like theft of copper), or simple accidents like autos running into a substation. We've also had one or two from lack of maintenance, such as the recent longer one. I don't believe we've ever had a brownout. We had a blackout last night. I was doing some research on my computer when, right at midnight, we lost power. I went to bed. My husband who was already asleep awakened about 3:45 and discovered no power. He woke me up while reporting this outage, but I don't think he was the first. Fifteen minutes later at 4:00 am on the nose, the power came back on. This outage affected 194 people. It was caused by wind damage when a small lightening storm came through, they said.

                2. Miebakagh57 profile image66
                  Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

                  Miz, those solar panels and batteries are beginning to appear in the Nigerian markets.                                                And they look quite expensive. I notice that it's the banks that began to applied them as part of the global technology in a competetive banking sector. I'm yet to notice a private residence that has install the solar technology. Most of the very rich guys will prefer a big industry-like generator at their big house.                                          I've a Elemax Honda 2800 capacity generator. I seldon use it now, as I lost my laptop and digital camera to theft.

  9. Nathanville profile image93
    Nathanvilleposted 13 months ago

    We’ve finally taken the plunge, and reducing our carbon footprint by having solar panels 3.5KW and a battery 5.2KW system installed within the next few weeks.  And FYI the average British home uses just third of energy than the average American home, so for the UK the system we’re getting is more than sufficient to make us almost self-sufficient during the summer months (when we get up to 18 hours of daylight a day). 

    Once the system is installed, as well as selling any surplus electricity we produce to the National Grid, we’ll also be able to use the battery to buy electricity from the grid during the early hours of the morning, when electricity is cheap, to top up our battery for later use.

    1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
      Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

      Authur,  18 hours of sunlight a day? That's amazing! It seems you've re-adjust the globe on it's axis to my country's disfavour. Lol!

      1. Nathanville profile image93
        Nathanvilleposted 13 months agoin reply to this

        Yep, where we live in Britian:-

        On the 21st June (longest day of the year) sunset is at 10pm and sunrise is at 4am.  In Scotland (which is further north) they get about 19 hours of sunlight on that day. 

        However, come mid winter, on the 21st December (the shortest day of the year) sun rise isn't until 8am and dusk is at 4pm (only 8 hours of daylight); and in Scotland they only get 7 hours of daylight at that time of year.

        1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
          Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

          I understand the Soltice effects on June 21 and December 21 each year.                                       But this varied from country to country. I learn that in my geography classs.                                                                Nevertheless, sunset and sunrise in Britain on these days at 10.00 PM and 4.00 AM are still amazing. Thank you.

          1. Nathanville profile image93
            Nathanvilleposted 13 months agoin reply to this

            Yep it is; and its great at that time of year, when the sun is already high in the sky when you get up first thing in the morning, and you can have a BBQ (socialising with your friends in your back garden) in the evening, and it's still daylight at 10pm, when people are thinking about going home.

  10. Kathryn L Hill profile image77
    Kathryn L Hillposted 13 months ago

    Britain will be 

    1. installing solar panels 3.5KW

    2. installing a battery 5.2KW system
     
    3. enabling people to be close to self-sufficient during the summer months.
    (when Britain gets up to 18 hours of daylight a day. yikes!)
     
    4. enabling citizens earn extra money by selling surplus electricity to the "National Grid."

    5. enabling citizens to buy electricity at a reduced price from "the grid" during the early hours of the morning ...

    "when electricity is cheap, to "top up" battery (?) for later use." Huh?
       
    Q. Can you explain any of this further or in greater detail, Nathanville?

  11. Kathryn L Hill profile image77
    Kathryn L Hillposted 13 months ago

    For instance:

    How is the The National Grid being installed?
    Where is the The National Grid being installed?
    Why is energy produced in the morning cheaper?
    How does one buy and sell energy from the soon-to-be-installed National Grid?
    How long has Britain been working on the installation process? years? months? weeks?

    wondering

    1. Nathanville profile image93
      Nathanvilleposted 13 months agoin reply to this

      All good questions:-

      #1:  The National Grid was built in the UK in 1935 (it was the first integrated national grid in the world).  Of course, in those days it was relatively simple e.g. a network of high voltage power cables connecting big power stations to the homes.

      Below is an old video of how the British National Grid used to work just 10 years ago; although it’s got a lot smarter since then:- https://youtu.be/vX0G9F42puY

      #2:  Over the past 10 years the National Grid has been transformed into a ‘Smart Grid’ to enable clever movement of power around the grid to meet supply and demand; as explained in the above video.

      #3:  As part of Government Policy, since 2016 every energy supply has installed a ‘smart meter’ in to virtually every home in Britain; which helps homeowners see how they are using their energy so as to make informed choices on how to reduce energy use, and save money on their energy bills:-

      Smart Meter (Smart In-home Display Unit): https://youtu.be/VinOp8dYbhA

      #4:  Each European country has its own National Grid, and over the past 5 years (since the video shown below) each European Nation’s national grid has been connected to all their neighbours’ national grids; to create a ‘super grid’ covering the whole of Europe e.g. so that Britain can sell surplus wind energy to France or Germany; buy hydropower energy from Norway, and solar power from Spain etc.

      EU Common Grid Model: https://youtu.be/0bm4hqINTyI

      #5:  The reason why energy is cheaper in the early hours of the morning is because demand for it is at its lowest at that time (supply & demand) e.g. the wind turbines out at sea will continue to produce energy day and night regardless; although Scotland is developing technology (R&D) for using sea water to convert surplus Renewable Electricity in to Green Hydrogen (for storage), and conversion back to green electricity when required (a form a battery), with the only bi-product being water.

      What is Green Hydrogen?  https://youtu.be/gEByrL5a27c

      This new technology of using Green Hydrogen for storage of surplus electricity is being incorporated in to the artificial island currently being built by 10 European countries, including the UK, in the North Sea, halfway between England and Norway.  The New Island, when operational in a few years’ time, will act as a hub for generating enough Renewable Energy for 80 million homes across northern Europe, and will meet 10% of the UK’s energy needs.

      North Sea Wind Power Hub (artificial island):  https://youtu.be/lBnWEK9IUn4

      #6:  As stated above, the UK’s national grid has existed since 1935, but has only evolved into a ‘Smart Grid’ within the last 10 years; predominantly through new technology rather than a complete rebuild.

      What makes buying and selling energy on the national grid possible has been the rollout of the ‘Smart Meter’, which started in 2016 e.g. the smart meter handles and records all the completed processes, so that it can for example record how much surplus electricity you export, and when; thus making the National Grid Smart.

      Octopus Energy: Agile Tariff - Get Paid To Use Electricity! How It Works  https://youtu.be/bjcqGu0ib5w

      #7:  So in answer to your last point; the Grid started to became really smart with the rollout of smart meters in the homes; which was a five year Government programme that started in 2016 (five years ago).

      Tesla Powerwall: https://youtu.be/jB6jyy0Joq8

      1. Kathryn L Hill profile image77
        Kathryn L Hillposted 13 months agoin reply to this

        Thank You! Now I will research the American Grid and get back.

        1. Nathanville profile image93
          Nathanvilleposted 13 months agoin reply to this

          Thanks, I shall look forward to whatever you find.

          1. Miebakagh57 profile image66
            Miebakagh57posted 13 months agoin reply to this

            Ditto. And thanks.

  12. Nathanville profile image93
    Nathanvilleposted 12 months ago

    Yesterday, live on the 'Daily Climate Show' on the British Sky News Channel on TV, at 1pm; live 'as-at' data supplied by the National Grid showed the UK's energy mix as at that time:-

    Fossil Fuels = 19%
    Renewable Energy = 66%
    Nuclear = 15%

    1. Kathryn L Hill profile image77
      Kathryn L Hillposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      That's great, Nathanville!  Really great.

    2. Castlepaloma profile image73
      Castlepalomaposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      Canada is about the same in renewable energy.

      We are the worst for recycling waste. Too much space, i guess.

 
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