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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (7 posts)

When your children quickly grow up and head out on their own, what to do next?

  1. websclubs profile image55
    websclubsposted 7 years ago

    When your children quickly grow up and head out on their own, what to do next?

  2. profile image0
    gregster77posted 7 years ago

    Background1,2,3

    In Biblical times, marriages were arranged by the parents of the bride and groom. The parents sometimes allowed their children to have a say in the choice, but frequently they did not (Genesis 21:21, 24:1-4, 38:6, Judges 14:1-2). Dating and courtship did not precede marriage. The negotiations by the parents resulted in a betrothal, a binding agreement pledging the bride and groom to marriage. Once the groom took the bride into his home, they were considered married. Typically, girls were betrothed shortly after puberty, and the marriage was consummated one year later.

    Various ceremonies and feasts accompanied the wedding day at different times in history, but the wedding was not performed, sanctioned or blessed by religious officials. As far as is known, there was no exchange of marriage vows, and our commonly used marriage vows do not come from the Bible. The marriage was neither a civil nor a religious matter, but numerous religious obligations came as a result.

    Levirate marriage was practiced in Old Testament times. If a man died leaving no male heir, his brother was required to marry his widow and produce children (Deuteronomy 25:5-10). This, and other forms of polygamy, were acceptable in Old Testament times, although only wealthy men could afford multiple wives. King Solomon was the most notable polygamist with his 700 wives and 300 concubines (1 Kings 11:3).

    Institution of Marriage

    Marriage was instituted by God as a lifelong commitment (Genesis 2:18-24, Matthew 19:3-61, 1 Timothy 4:1-5). In Old Testament times, everyone was expected to be married and have children (Proverbs 18:22, Jeremiah 29:6). However, Jesus was unmarried and said remaining unmarried (celibacy) was a good choice for those who could accept that life and devote themselves to God (Matthew 19:10-12). The apostle Paul was also unmarried. He said remaining unmarried was a good and holy alternative, but it is better to marry than to be tempted into immorality by passion (1 Corinthians 7:8-9). Peter and many of the other apostles were married (Matthew 8:14, 1 Corinthians 9:5), so marriage is compatible with committed service to God.

  3. nightwork4 profile image59
    nightwork4posted 7 years ago

    when it happens to me i'm turning one bedroom into a killer washroom . were also going to have a huge party celebration our independence

  4. profile image49
    Motivate123posted 7 years ago

    continue to love and support them and live your life....

  5. Rabia Sajjad profile image57
    Rabia Sajjadposted 7 years ago

    Someone said,"It takes a couple of year to teach the baby how to talk and walk, but it takes a whole life ahead to tell him to shut up and stop".
    So its in vain to behave crudely with the little ones. Give them a friendly response and suggest different new things to him if you want to stop him from creating some trouble.Giving alternate is always better than to snatch anything from his hand as it makes him rebel.
    follow my hub for some suggestions.
    http://hubpages.com/hub/kids-are-lovable

  6. Sterling Carter profile image74
    Sterling Carterposted 7 years ago

    I long for the day...

    I don't drink but I think I might turn over a new leaf on that great day. At least for a couple of hours.

  7. Abecedarian profile image76
    Abecedarianposted 7 years ago

    Seal the door shut, because they will come back.  Just kidding, sort of.  I love my kids, but the oldest 2 are on their own and my oldest son is in college, but still lives at home (independently- he pays for his own stuff, we just provide a room and sometimes board, when he's here). My last one has another year before he goes off to college, but he does his own thing. So, it's been great, my husband and I have gradually started "dating" again and it's been nice. We now find more things to do on our own, we even pick hobby ideas that we can do together, landscaping, bike riding, hunting, etc. Make the best of it and it'll be a great experience. Let the kids worry about themselves and just be there to guide them through the rough spots. My son-in-law joined the Air Force, just waiting for a duty station so we can take a trip.

 
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