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jump to last post 1-10 of 10 discussions (10 posts)

If you were to list the qualities of a good parent, what would they be?

  1. pstraubie48 profile image86
    pstraubie48posted 5 years ago

    If you were to list the qualities of a good parent, what would they be?

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/7452613_f260.jpg

  2. lburmaster profile image82
    lburmasterposted 5 years ago

    Friendly, prepared, loyal, devoted, consistent, fun, entertaining, calm, centered, focused.

  3. Faith Reaper profile image85
    Faith Reaperposted 5 years ago

    Loves unconditionally, trustworthy (can approach them with any issue), supportive, compassionate, kind, sets an example (character and morals), lets the child know that a parent is not perfect, great encourager, applying appropriate discipline when necessary, and teaching them by showing how to love themselves for who they are and to love others.

  4. Malkie Wersba profile image59
    Malkie Wersbaposted 5 years ago

    Accepting.  It's hard to add another one, because I just think accepting your kid for who they are is so important.    But, I think that an amazing sense of humor (especially the ability to laugh things off and laugh at yourself) help.  My daughter drew with permanent marker on the wall and I think most parents would have freaked out but I just laughed and got myself a tank of rubbing alcohol and we cleaned it together wink

    The second big thing is TIME.  My daughter and I spend 100% of the day together and I give her that TIME because I know that she will grow up and have her only life (which I will have to ACCEPT) so I appreciate the TIME we have now (she's 3).  I think that goes with prioritizing life.  I gave up a legal career (potentially big paying, I guess) because you can do the math and figure out that if you give up the clothing, the house, the manicures, the hair, and the television sets, you actually are just as rich without the job (or at least I was, especially with the cost of day care), but now I have the TIME that I didn't have before.

    The last thing I would say is the ability to say "no" (and yes, but kids are so cute, I find it easy to say yes to ballet classes, trips, her favorite meals from scratch, etc).  I have a really hard time saying no.  She has the cutest voice and she'll say "Mama and me are best friends fo'eva'" and I want to give her the world, but I do say no (and I even gave her a 30-second time out for the permanent marker incident even though I kind-of felt it was my fault for leaving them out and then having her play in the room by herself!smile

    I hope that helps!!!

  5. Diana Lee profile image82
    Diana Leeposted 5 years ago

    Patience, understanding, and knowing you need not be perfect to be a good parent.  The important thing is you try.

  6. duffsmom profile image60
    duffsmomposted 5 years ago

    Patient, loving, a quick and easy sense of humor, the ability to have fun with the kids and remember what it feels like to be a kid, loyal and being smart couldn't hurt.

  7. Charlu profile image79
    Charluposted 5 years ago

    Loving..unconditionally while accepting them as an individual, Inspiring...allowing them to be creative and develop their own unique personalities, style, and forms of art, Supportive... sometimes hard to do when your not really loving their new choice of music, style, or careers, spiritual beliefs, or choice of girl/boyfriends. This also includes allowing them to express emotions sometimes just having a good cry together and being there in times of need.

    Finally, but probably one of the most important is respect...remembering you have to give it to get it and that goes from being able to laugh with them at some goofy mistakes, while still maintaining that respect when handing out a disciplinary action that's gonna hurt you more than them....without the screaming,or embarrassing ridicule in front of others etc. Letting them know it's OK to agree to disagree sometimes and that you can still respect that persons opinion or choice.

    That along with so much more is a good start

  8. sleepylog profile image96
    sleepylogposted 5 years ago

    Patience
    Empathy
    Sympathy
    Good listener
    Non-judgmental
    Common sense
    Good sense of humour
    Playful
    Fair
    Consistent

  9. profile image71
    ElleBeeposted 5 years ago

    Caring, patient, understanding, loving, kind, firm when necessary, provide guidance.

  10. gmwilliams profile image86
    gmwilliamsposted 3 years ago

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/8562422_f260.jpg

    Good parents are  positive, nurturing, and encouraging.  They also embue their child with a high sense of self and self-confidence. They treat their children in a respectful manner, never treat them in ways that are disrespectful and/or soul destroying. 

    Good parents instill in their child a can do and unstoppable attitude in the face of obstacles and failures.  They also encourage and support their child's dreams and aspirations (as long as it is positive), never telling them that their dreams are fantastical or unrealistic.  They treat their child as an individual instead of believing that the child is a replica of them. 

    Good parents are also involved in their child's life.  They also include their child in their lives, not seeing the child as a noisome yet barely tolerable inconvenience.  They consider their child to be an enjoyment.   They listen to their child, never invalidating his/her experiences and/or viewpoints.  They realize that their child have opinions and beliefs as valid as theirs.

    Good parents cultivate their child's unique talents.  They see the importance of their child doing things that they are naturally attuned to and/or are passionate about.  They do not push their child to be one of the masses, the crowd, and/or to be average.  They appreciate and rejoice in their child's uniqueness. 

    Good parents do not play favorites with their children if they have more than one child.  They see all of their children as unique jewels. All of their children are treated with reverence, love, and respect.   If they elect to have a larger family, the oldest child is not discarded nor pressed into being an adult before he/she is ready, the middle child is not overlooked and left to his/her own devices, and the youngest child is not treated more preferentially than the older siblings in the family.

    Good parents are there for their child through the good and bad times.  They realize that children do fail and make mistakes.  After all, those things are part of learning, growth, and development.  They do not continuously rehash their child's mistakes, letting the past........BE PAST.   They respect their child's differences whether it is lifestyle, religious beliefs, or other related choices.  They do not expect their child to follow their lifestyle nor do they disavow, even disown, their child if he/she elects a different path.  Sadly, good parents are FEW and FAR BETWEEN; the average parent has HIS/HER agenda regarding parenting.



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