As a child/teen, did your parents pressure you to have an A average and if you d

Jump to Last Post 1-8 of 8 discussions (17 posts)
  1. gmwilliams profile image85
    gmwilliamsposted 3 years ago

    As a child/teen, did your parents pressure you to have an A average and if you did not have an

    A average, did your parents consider you to be inept, even unintelligent?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/9922426_f260.jpg

  2. Penny G profile image70
    Penny Gposted 3 years ago

    My parents never cared about our grades, never asked for our report cards, and didn't really care if we went to school. Our Mom just didn't want us home. Even if we were sick. She'd leave us at school on a cot. Sadly, none of graduated either.

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      This is a sad extreme.

    2. Penny G profile image70
      Penny Gposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes it is. Now as I look back, it was terrible. I guess they never worried about our future, just if we minded and got along with each other. Can't change it, forward on!

  3. Sri T profile image77
    Sri Tposted 3 years ago

    My parent said she would give me money for every "A" that I received. I had so many "A's" she had to stop giving me money.

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      What your mother did was a BUSINESS model of motivation.

  4. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 3 years ago

    My mom was not exactly a "Tiger Mom" however she was known for breaking out the belt if she felt our report cards reflected a lack of effort on our parts. There was no Sylvan Learning Center.
    The belt was our tutor.

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Also another motivator was denigrating the child, telling him/her that he/she will work at a dead end job if grades weren't up to snuff.  Child would be further told that he/she is not apt, stupid, or retarded.

    2. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Are we related? LOL!
      Seriously I can't tell you how often I was asked; "Are you retarded?"  "Have you lost your mind?" " You're f-ing up your life! "Maybe you should just give your uncle a call to see if he can get you a job in the steel mill!"

  5. Karen Ray profile image76
    Karen Rayposted 3 years ago

    My parents always encouraged us to do the best we could do. Good grades came easy so it wasn't a problem, however they always made sure we did our homework and we knew school came first. We didn't spend the night away from home on school nights. Bad grades would mean losing out on activities or whatever until they came up.  I always remember what a teacher told me regarding one of my children. She said she'd rather have "well rounded" students who made acceptable grades in everything than the extreme "gotta have an A" students who tended to fall smooth apart if they didn't get an A. Like they couldn't cope with anything less than perfect. Well, good grades are certainly important, but kids need to learn to fail just as they need to learn to succeed.

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Excellent answer indeed!

  6. kerbev profile image54
    kerbevposted 3 years ago

    An A wasn't needed, but it had to be B- or better.  For us, it was an expectation.  "We expect you to do well because we know you are capable of it."  Keep in mind, we were all capable of it.  She wasn't asking more than was possible.

    They did not judge our intelligence by class grades, but rather they judged our effort by them.

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I was told to make an A in school. In elementary school, I was an A student but in high school and college,a B student much to my parent's chagrin! If one wasn't an A student, my parents looked down on him/her! They were quite intolerant of failures.

  7. LoisRyan13903 profile image81
    LoisRyan13903posted 3 years ago

    I struggled in my elementary school years up to about grade 4.  My mother did try to push me not to be an A student but just to pass.  She took me to see a child psychologist and found out that I am learning disabled-I have dyslexia.  The psychologist told my mom that I would eventually get caught up and that I was exceptionally intelligent.  Yeah I did and took me a while did go on to college. She offered incentives like a dime a week-a lot of money back then-when I put in an effort and did my homework neatly.

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      What a GREAT mother you had.  God bless mom!  She was a very patient and evolved mother, the type of mother that every mother should aspire to BE..

    2. LoisRyan13903 profile image81
      LoisRyan13903posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you very much and it taught me when I became a mother with my younger daughter being autistic

  8. Jackie Lynnley profile image90
    Jackie Lynnleyposted 3 years ago

    My siblings and I were expected to have A or B; and I do not remember our parents telling us that; we just seemed to know it and a couple of my brothers were Valedictorians. It never really mattered to me. I wanted a good grade but beating someone out for something was not important.
    I got to spend one year tutoring other students in math because the teacher felt sure I knew it all and I had no work to do the whole year but had to take all the tests.
    That was fun.

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)