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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (12 posts)

What's the best way to store fresh basil leaves?

  1. Daughter Of Maat profile image96
    Daughter Of Maatposted 5 years ago

    What's the best way to store fresh basil leaves?

    I just clipped my basil plants and usually I use them right away, but I realized AFTER I cut them that I don't have any tomatoes! I need to keep them until tomorrow, what's the best way to store them to keep them as fresh as possible?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/7143024_f260.jpg

  2. Handicapped Chef profile image76
    Handicapped Chefposted 5 years ago

    A vendor at my local farmers market is selling basil w/ roots (and a little mud) still attached and it lasts more than a week in a vase w/ water and makes a lovely centerpiece, too (no need for an ugly plastic bag w/ those roots, see). I change the water every day.

    Otherwise, I just store it in a plastic bag on the counter, loosely sealed and sprinkled w/ a bit of water. I don't bother putting it in a vase w/ water. It doesn't seem to make a difference; lasts a couple of days either way, I've found.

    1. Daughter Of Maat profile image96
      Daughter Of Maatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'll let you know how this works! Thank you!

    2. Handicapped Chef profile image76
      Handicapped Chefposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      This method will work for a few days...there is nothing better than cooking with fresh herbs and spices......good luck.

    3. Daughter Of Maat profile image96
      Daughter Of Maatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Indeed! That's why I always wait to clip them, but I this time, I thought I had tomatoes to make soup, but sadly I didn't! So far, so good. I hope to use them today though.

  3. scottcgruber profile image79
    scottcgruberposted 5 years ago

    If the leaves are still attached to the stems, you can keep them in a vase or even a glass of water. Cut the stems at a 45 degree angle before putting them in the vase. Right now I have a fresh bunch of basil in my kitchen that was clipped a week ago, preserved in a small vase.

    If you've already clipped the leaves from the stems, the prognosis may not be so good. You may need to freeze them or turn them into pesto instead of using them fresh.

    1. Daughter Of Maat profile image96
      Daughter Of Maatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      They are clipped, but I just need to keep them one day. They tend to shrivel if I put them in the fridge though.

  4. TeachableMoments profile image76
    TeachableMomentsposted 5 years ago

    My grandmother would always wrap the basil leaves in a damp paper towel then place them in a bag and store in the fridge. The leaves lasted a few days. Hope this helps.

  5. fpherj48 profile image78
    fpherj48posted 5 years ago

    Of course make sure they stay dry.....put them loosely in a glass jar and close tightly and refrigerate.  That will keep them fresh and maintain their nutrients & color.     Do you ever dry out your basil and store as an herb?   I dry, celery leaves, mint and basil and store them in glass jars in the pantry for use all year.

    1. Daughter Of Maat profile image96
      Daughter Of Maatposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      No I haven't tried drying my herbs, I've never had enough to dry! I think I might this year though, my basil plants are looking awesome!! How do you dry yours?

    2. fpherj48 profile image78
      fpherj48posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Just spread them out on a flat pan, and leave them to dry out, I usually place the pan on top of the fridge, so they're out of the way.  Too simple.

  6. breathing profile image58
    breathingposted 2 years ago

    Basil plant can be used for many purposes. But in order to use the plant for those purposes you need to store fresh basil leaves. Most of us fail to do so due to lack of proper knowledge. Here I’ll discuss a few ways that the experts have suggested. The best thing is that all of these processes are very easy to perform. Hopefully everybody looking to store fresh basil leaves can be greatly benefited from these ways.

    Freezing the whole leaves is a very common technique. But you shouldn’t do it altogether. Because upon freezing, the basil leaves will shrink. Do this in the following steps:

    a. Remove the leaves right from its stem. Then blanch it in the boiling water for almost 2 seconds.

    b. Then put the blanched leaves in an ice bath.

    c.Finally dry the leaves completely and separate the layers using parchment paper/wax. Then store them in the freezer container.

    Another way is to puree and freeze the basil leaves. Here are also a few steps to complete the entire process:

    a. Just like the previous method, remove the leaves from stem. Then wash and dry the resulting leaves.

    b. Take the help of a food processor in order to puree the fresh basil leaves. Use 1 spoon of olive oil for each cup of basil.

    c. Eventually freeze the pureed basil in ice cube tray and finally store them in a large plastic bag (resealable) or freezer container.

 
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