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Which is better a rub, marinade, or a sauce on bar-b-que meat?

  1. tsmog profile image82
    tsmogposted 9 months ago

    Which is better a rub, marinade, or a sauce on bar-b-que meat?

    Maybe it is different for different selections?

  2. Ericdierker profile image54
    Ericdierkerposted 9 months ago

    You seemed to have forgotten about just leave it alone ;-)

    Let us just say we have a T-Bone. I like to lemon soak for about 10 minutes. White pepper is something I might add. Then I rinse that baby fully clean. This is not as much for flavor but to start breaking down that meat. Then if the steak is really well marbled just some nice seasoning salt and off we go.

    But rubs are awesome too. I get a little aggressive here and knead the poor thing. One of my favs is with Lemon Pepper. But then again I rinse. And then I might cheat and actually butter before grilling.

    Sauces are great. I like to put the sauce on and leave it for a half hour or so. That sauce has to have some kind of combo of sugar and vinegar.

    The key to all of these for me is to start breaking down the enzymes long before applying heat. But on the other hand if you have a good marbled 18 day or longer aged piece of meat and Mesquite and Oak for your fire. Man o Man just leave that baby alone and do not add a thing.
    I just loved being a steak cook in big Cowboy Steak houses. It is just a wonderful art.

    1. tsmog profile image82
      tsmogposted 9 months agoin reply to this

      I guess I did leave out the 'Do Not Amend' choice. Good point Eric. My brother an ex-butcher kinda' did not amend, but had some secrets he never told. Interesting about using lemon to begin the process. I should look for articles about bar-b-queing.

  3. Wesman Todd Shaw profile image97
    Wesman Todd Shawposted 9 months ago

    Yeah, it's probable that someone would prefer different ones for different meats. I think it would be impossible for me to have especially clear preferences simply because, where I live in Texas, there are too many to every get around to trying.

    I mean here we have BBQ as something like a culinary religion. And so, our groceries have big brands that are nationwide, and then all sorts of locally produced products. It's hard to mess up meat to begin with, and all these rubs and sauces are pretty good. I guess you mainly need to know how much spice you or your guests can handle.

    1. tsmog profile image82
      tsmogposted 9 months agoin reply to this

      I was in Texas where my dad's side of the family is. They live in the College Station / Bryan area and region. I remember a bar-b-que when about high school sophomore and they did not use sauce on the really huge grill on a ranch.

  4. Terrielynn1 profile image93
    Terrielynn1posted 9 months ago

    Hi, Tim. I like marinade and rubs. I like the flavor it gets leaving them to soak in it over night. I only use barbecue in hamburgers. If I am making a slow cooker pot roast hen I use a rub and let it cook in its own juice. what do you use? and why?

    1. tsmog profile image82
      tsmogposted 9 months agoin reply to this

      I marinade, but brush it on the meat too when on the grill.

    2. Terrielynn1 profile image93
      Terrielynn1posted 9 months agoin reply to this

      Some times I do roasts low and slow in the slowcooker and they cook in there own juoce with just the rub. It's a beautiful thing, LOL.

  5. Handicapped Chef profile image78
    Handicapped Chefposted 9 months ago

    I Dry rub.

    I also Brine for ribs and whole chickens. Not for butts/shoulders.

    I don't know why y'all are having problems with dried herbs or sugar in you rubs.

    For smoking I cook at 250 F to 275F for ribs and butts.
    Butts can go 12 hours plus. Awesome bark and no burning at that heat.
    And my rub contains the regulars plus ground coffee, ground anchos , brown sugar and various herbs.
    Never a burnt taste in decades.

    For chicken I pop temp up to 300F range to get a crispy skin. 250F gets a tender bird but no crisp skin.

    I just made a huge bunch of smoked beef ribs over xmas.

    I do slow and low for ribs, then , when done to likeness, pop over a very hot grill 3 minutes a side to crisp and then sauce once plated.

    YMMV, but sauce likes to burn on the grill and definitely ^&%$s up your grill or smoker grates.
    Good luck.

    Grilling or smoking outdoors for some time and then finishing in the oven in foil to cook aka "Texas Crutch" always works well too.

    1. tsmog profile image82
      tsmogposted 9 months agoin reply to this

      Very informative!!! Thanks!!! My curiosity is perked up a bit to research for articles. After reading this and Eric's I realize I don't understand perhaps the basic of understanding cooking meats.

    2. Ericdierker profile image54
      Ericdierkerposted 9 months agoin reply to this

      Well, well, well -- liked this answer so much I just flew over there and followed this fellow who calls himself handicapped and ends his last sentence with the "Texas Crutch".

 
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