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jump to last post 1-9 of 9 discussions (14 posts)

CDC Study: Flu Vaccine Ineffective in 91% of Seniors..

  1. sannyasinman profile image59
    sannyasinmanposted 5 years ago
    1. wilderness profile image97
      wildernessposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Nope.  And even at 63 I'm not likely to.  Never saw a reason - the flu is hardly in the same class as TB, polio, etc.

    2. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I was always afraid of the flu vaccine.  Plus, I figured people in fair and good health could handle the flu;  their bodies had a natural way of fighting it and build up immunity to disease;  I had had the flu a few times and always recovered well.
      But since I developed an immune system disease 2 years ago,  my doc recommended vaccination so yes I do get one each year.

  2. Abby Campbell profile image95
    Abby Campbellposted 5 years ago

    I saw the news on this last week. Wow is all I have to say!  I have never believed in the flu shot as I've known people who have died from flu complications, even after having a flu shot. Therefore, I never received a flu shot personally. Most people I know who have not had the flu shot fared better too. They were able to avoid the flu in most cases. Those I've know who have had the flu shot always seemed to get the worse cases of the flu. Go figure!  If it has little effectiveness, why bother?

  3. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    That is an unfortunate low rate of coverage.  But I would still take it. 9% safer (for free) is still worth doing in my book.  Especially as 27 people in my state (IL) died of the flu this flu season.

  4. Uninvited Writer profile image84
    Uninvited Writerposted 5 years ago

    I get a flu shot, have never had a problem and haven't had the flu in at least 10 years.

    1. sannyasinman profile image59
      sannyasinmanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I have NEVER had a flu shot, and have NEVER had the flu (that's over 30 years) . . . this despite the fact that people around me who have been vaccinated with the flu virus, could easily have infected me.

      I guess I must have a strong, healthy, natural immune system - fancy that!

  5. innersmiff profile image72
    innersmiffposted 5 years ago

    If anybody doesn't want to take the vaccine but is interested in a flu remedy, here is an account from a friend:

    "I just had that flu that is going´╗┐ around and I used large amounts of cinnamon and honey and it was completely gone in 3 days with no residual sniffles or anything. It was a really painful flu, my neck, head and shoulders especially were killing me and the cinnamon helped with that. So did drinking detoxifying teas like nettle and mint, and taking epsom salts baths."

    Hope this helps - I haven't tried it myself since I've never had flu (never taken the shot either).

  6. mythbuster profile image81
    mythbusterposted 5 years ago

    Thanks for the link! No, I haven't had a flu shot.
    I'll be sharing the link - interesting information.

  7. Uninvited Writer profile image84
    Uninvited Writerposted 5 years ago

    According to the same survey it is 50% effective for those 50-64,

    1. sannyasinman profile image59
      sannyasinmanposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, I agree vaccination is a crap shoot!

      You may get protection, you may not.
      You may still get the disease, you may not.
      You may suffer severe sideeffects, or you might not.
      You may even die, or you might not.
      It is anyone's guess. Nobody knows.

      . . .and drug companies are now demanding immunity from prosecution for any health damage caused by their vaccines. Why would they do this if their vaccines have been adequately tested and are safe?

      1. wilderness profile image97
        wildernessposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        Maybe because no medical treatment, drug or otherwise, is 100% effective and there is always a chance it will do more damage than good.

        Couple that with a sue happy society, always looking for an easy buck from deep pockets, and all the testing in the world won't be enough.

  8. jenniferrpovey profile image90
    jenniferrpoveyposted 5 years ago

    For the umpteenth time.

    You cannot get the flu from the flu shot. Period. It is an inactivated virus. There is a microscopic chance of getting the flu from the nasal vaccine, which is a live virus (hence why that vaccine is only recommended for healthy people with good immune systems).

    It is biologically impossible to get the flu from the shot.

    It is biologically impossible to give anyone else the flu by having the flu shot.

    What is possible?

    1. To get side effects from the vaccine. Many people get muscle aches at the injection site from intramuscular vaccines. The intradermal vaccine introduced this year can result in several days of itching at the vaccination shot. A minority of people react badly to the flu shot and may get muscle aches and very mild flu-like symptoms - if you fall into that minority, not getting the shot is understandable.

    2. The flu vaccine takes two weeks to take effect. Especially if you get it late in the season, there is a very real risk of being exposed to the flu in the doctor's office, which creates an illusory effect of "I got the vaccine and promptly got the flu."

    Innersmith, was it raw honey your friend was eating? Raw honey is supposed to have an immune-boosting effect, but I've never tried it personally.

  9. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    How can you know? Look at the CDC stats such as the ones linked to here.  If drug companies were as evil and powerful as some suggest, wouldn't they have suppressed that information?

 
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