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jump to last post 1-11 of 11 discussions (11 posts)

The problem with me is, i was always a worrier but i think i have pushed my self

  1. rebz10 profile image51
    rebz10posted 7 years ago

    The problem with me is, i was always a worrier but i think i have pushed my self too far, i had...

    a panic attack or anxiety attack, it was terrifying, i was fine after it, but then a couple days later it happened again, just out of no where, nothing to trigger it. And for the last 4 days i wake up, and for the whole day i feel like im in a bubble or something, or a dream, im finding it hard to focus on everything as a whole and it's terrifying me. It's so intense and is a constant thing, it doesnt just come and go, it's always there. I went to the doctors but she was terrible and hardly listened to me and tried to give me anti-depressents. im not depressed and i dont want to take medicatio

  2. Thunder Vixen profile image61
    Thunder Vixenposted 7 years ago

    This isn't a problem that you would see a general doctor for, they only know so much. Go see a specialist, like a psychologist they know a lot more about it than your doctor would if you need a referral for insurance purposes tell the doctor how it's ruining your day today life.

  3. davidseeger profile image58
    davidseegerposted 7 years ago

    You've made several good steps. First going to a doctor was a proper first step. Recognizing that she didn't grasp your situation was also a good step. Laying out your thoughts here was another good step. You don't want to keep this problem bottled up within your self. It is not going away without help. The next good step, then, is finding another practitionerwho can help you. I suggest you check with a local hospital and see if they can recommend an outside support group that you can attend. Find people with a similar problem and find what is working for them. Again, this is not going to be a quick solution. Some of these support groups can be helpful. Some not. I suggest that you not look to the support group for the solution. Rather, let them guide you to resources that have been successful for them.
    Good luck and God bless.

  4. profile image0
    jasper420posted 7 years ago

    acceptance i had a problem with this to and i took drugs to deal with it but when it all comes down acceptance is the key to a happy life if you accept things how they were how they are and how they are going to be then you have no room for worry anxeity is the effect of not living in the present try to focus on the now not the before or after and accept what life has in store and had instore for you

  5. profile image45
    Panicposted 7 years ago

    The first step in ending panic attacks is recognizing that they are not harmful and that they come and go. This of course presumes that other diagnoses have been ruled out, like things that are imminently dangerous. Take real heart attacks or real danger from domestic violence as examples.

  6. DaNoblest profile image60
    DaNoblestposted 7 years ago

    First I want you to realize that you are not alone. Many people suffer from anxiety disorders, I am one of them. That you are seeking treatment already is a good thing. The sooner you learn how to deal with anxiety the better. Understanding the causes of anxiety will help you understand what is going on and be better equipped to fight it. This is a link to a good medical study on anxiety - http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/04/magaz … anted=all.

    The feeling of floating is called depersonalization/derealization and is a normal symptom of severe anxiety. Even though it is a scary feeling it is harmless.

    Search for a local mental health clinic nearby and go there. They specialize in these types of conditions and will guide you to more resources that can help you. Good luck =]

  7. jelliott115 profile image60
    jelliott115posted 7 years ago

    Please read this. I REALLY hope it helps. I know exactly what you're going through.

    http://hubpages.com/hub/Anxiety-an-Internal-Fight

  8. profile image0
    Jane16posted 7 years ago

    Have you tried relaxation exercise?

    Lie stretched out on the floor.  In your mind separate all your muscles.  Then one at a time tense each muscle for 10 seconds, then release, starting from your arms, tummy, legs, etc.  Try and use every muscle you possibly can.

    Also, during the anxiety attack, say to yourself, "okay, this is a panic attack, I am not going to die". 

    Ride it, You will never be harmed or die from one, so just go with it.  You will find this relaxes you.

  9. profile image0
    stessilyposted 6 years ago

    There is much in life that can cause anxiety so your reaction is not necessarily abnormal.
    Apart from clinical anxiety, it is possible to overcome anxious feelings naturally. That doesn't mean that you won't have another anxiety attack. It just means that you'll be able to deal better with an attack and eventually not suffer from them so much.
    The method that seems to be successful for many is to stare the feeling down, accept that you're feeling anxious, briefly figure out the cause of the anxiety, and then release the feeling. It isn't as easy as it sounds but it usually works.
    Also find a way of pampering yourself when you feel anxious. Do something simple that you enjoy --- your favorite tune, nail polish, a drink of water, talk to someone you know, talk to your cat or dog.
    Keep pushing back the amount of time that's spent anxiously and you will see results.

  10. grinnin1 profile image82
    grinnin1posted 6 years ago

    You need to find a doctor who listens and doesn't act like you're crazy. You might need something that just calms down your entire central nervous system a little. Panic attacks can make you feel like you're dying, having a heart attack, they can jolt you out of your sleep, and make you feel crazy. And it can become pretty constant if you don't get a hold of it. Find someone who will listen to you. Sometimes all it takes is a Zanax or something similar to make you know it is a physiological thing and not just you going mental. There are things that will help. You may need something for anxiety and sometimes you can find that in an antidepressent. But whatever you end up doing, you need to find someone who listens to you and takes you seriously.

  11. artist101 profile image69
    artist101posted 5 years ago

    I was treated the same way. I can sympathize with totally. It was like I had the plague, or they were afraid they might catch it.
    There are a lot of physical reasons for panic attack, physical, not mental:
    among them are:
    1. Co2, if you feel better after you leave home, if it only happens at home, have all appliances checked by an authorized heating and air conditioning contractor.
    2. Hypo glycemia, when insulin drops out, it causes anxiety.
    3. Asthma
    4. Heart problems
    5. Hormones, not only Estrogen, but thyroid as well
    6. auto immune reactions, and disease
    7. Too much caffiene
    8. B complex deficiency
    9. magnesium deficiency
    10.a side effect of any drug, over the counter or otherwise
    11.food allergy, can cause racing heartbeat, and a feeling of doom, as well.
    Seeing a physician for a full physical is a good start.
    Vitamin b, will help if its stress, magnesium will help to calm the body and brain. A better diet consisting of protein, fat, and complex carbohydrates will help with hypoglycemia.
    A simple blood test taken before nine am , FSH, will reveal estrogen levels. A tsh will reveal thyroid levels. A diabetic test will reveal insulin levels, and hypoglycemia.
    Consulting a physician is warranted.
    An in ability to focus is called brain fog. Like thinking through peanut butter. It is usually associated with hypoglycemia, panic attacks,  and CFS, which has been found to be a combination of many things. It has been linked with an opportunist infection. Among those cited in recent studies are: candidiasis, cytomeglavirus, and epstein barr. The virus that causes mono. Epstein Barr has been linked to many auto immune diseases as well.
    Again a simple blood test, ANA, can verify your suspicions.
    I have written articles on these subjects, along with symptoms. Find a Doctor that will work with you.

 
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