This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is used to quickly and efficiently deliver files such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisements has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-12 of 12 discussions (13 posts)

Should I run away from my problems?

  1. InterestCaptured profile image87
    InterestCapturedposted 5 years ago

    Should I run away from my problems?

  2. drsohel profile image75
    drsohelposted 5 years ago

    Running away from problems doesn't solve the problem. It just keep you away for a while. But the problem persists. Sometimes running away from problems may raise new problems. So face it and try to solve it.

  3. edhan profile image59
    edhanposted 5 years ago

    No.

    It can snowball into a big problem. I always believe in solving problem before it starts to grow into a bigger problem. There is nothing cannot be solved. It is only a matter of how you handle the situation.

    Be calm and clear your mind before looking into the problem. You can solve it when you are calm and clear headed.

  4. tglowv profile image87
    tglowvposted 5 years ago

    You can run from your problems in most cases, but they will catch up with you. You will have to face them eventually. Sometimes it helps to write your problems down and how you might deal with each one. Then start tackling them!

  5. Cristale profile image85
    Cristaleposted 5 years ago

    Your skeletons will always come back to haunt you, unless you bury them by dealing with them. The problems will always come back to haunt you, especially when you least expect it. Fix the problem first, then run away smile

  6. connorj profile image76
    connorjposted 5 years ago

    Yes; to run away may serve you well. Yet run away only to re-group and confront your problem(s) once again (into the brink). Then face them once again with a fresh heart, mind and if necessary ammunition (yet ammunition to me is insight).

    1. connorj profile image76
      connorjposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      One of the most common responses during an anxious moment is responding emotionally from your amgydala (within your brain); I use "running away" as a metaphor for a temporary escape from emotionality; collect your thoughts then proceed...

  7. BlissfulWriter profile image74
    BlissfulWriterposted 5 years ago

    Depending on the problem, sometimes it helps.

  8. dghbrh profile image76
    dghbrhposted 5 years ago

    I will rather suggest you to make the problem run away from you. Its possible always. Do give it a try and you are sure gonna be surprised.
    good question.

  9. mathira profile image83
    mathiraposted 5 years ago

    Why should you run away from your problems? If you run away your problems will be there to add to your agony. Go towards your problem and amazingly you will find it no so mountainous as it seemed when you stayed far away from it.

  10. Rebecca2904 profile image77
    Rebecca2904posted 5 years ago

    I think it can be especially difficult to face problems sometimes, and running away and starting a new life just to get away from them might seem more appealing than facing up to them. But even if you do run away from them, they're still going to be there and they'll probably get worse the longer you leave them. Plus, on top of that, if they're still there you're probably always going to worry about them.

  11. lburmaster profile image82
    lburmasterposted 5 years ago

    Depends on the problem. An abusive husband, get rid of him. An evil co-worker, face them head on.

  12. CBartelmey profile image76
    CBartelmeyposted 5 years ago

    I don’t think you can.  I think a problem is just that, it is a “problem” and until you fix it, whatever that entails, it will remain.  One thing I would certainly recommend would be to look at the problem from every angle.  Sometimes what one would believe to be a fix could really only stand to make the problem worse.  Problems present us with a challenge, but the good thing is that every challenge I have faced has grown the person that I am.  It may have not happened instantly; most often it happened in retrospect as I looked back and realized that there was a lesson hidden in there.  I think that is the best we can do, face the problem, fix it and learn from it so that you aren’t faced with it again.  I wish you luck.

 
working