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How do you keep to a healthy diet and improve your food IQ?

  1. Xenonlit profile image60
    Xenonlitposted 5 years ago

    How do you keep to a healthy diet and improve your food IQ?

    It is not difficult these days, to get into a discussion about healthy eating. Without going into extreme health food nonsense, many of us are putting reasonable efforts into changing our bad habits. We are looking for better food and are willing to accept sound information. We do a lot of this by getting and sharing the information.

  2. Laceylinks profile image84
    Laceylinksposted 5 years ago

    It's easier to eat healthy if "good food" is all you buy and keep in the house. If you're looking for something to snack on and all you have handy is apples, oranges, pears, or trail mix, then that is what you will eat. Keeping fresh broccoli, carrots and other veggies in the fridge will spur you to make these foods your meal options as well. A good variety of foods containing phytonutrients (which is any fresh, whole food) eaten several times a day will provide a healthy diet. Improving your food IQ is easy if you spend time on your computer. Go to http://www.healthykidsplate.com/ for food that's healthy for kids, or for adult learning options you can take a look at http://www.choosemyplate.gov/healthy-ea … -tips.html to give your food IQ a boost. Eating healthy is something more people are taking a hard look at. It's good, we are a nation with a huge obesity and illness burden.

    1. Xenonlit profile image60
      Xenonlitposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Great answer and the links are appreciated!

  3. gracenotes profile image89
    gracenotesposted 5 years ago

    I changed my diet rather drastically about 8 months ago.  I do high-fat, moderately low carbohydrate.  It's working for me.  The biggest difference, for me, is I no longer eat wheat, nor any other grains with the exception of occasional rice.  The "wheat-ectomy" has made a positive difference in my health.

    However, even doing the things I am (which I think are prudent), I realize that there is not one diet to suit everyone.  We are all unique, not robot clones.

    I believe any good diet becomes a lifestyle.  Just getting rid of processed foods, and instead making everything from scratch is quite an undertaking, but will certainly make a huge difference to anyone's mental and physical health.

    To eat too much of one food is a recipe for disaster.  We need balance.

    1. Xenonlit profile image60
      Xenonlitposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I cook from scratch more than ever and have been enjoying the fresh summer veggies. In the winter, I find the frozen versions to be a convenient way to keep good food in the house.  Great answer. Thanks!

 
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