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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (12 posts)

What do you know about Asperger Syndrome?

  1. backporchstories profile image81
    backporchstoriesposted 5 years ago

    What do you know about Asperger Syndrome?

    Asperger syndrome is a new diagnosis of a form of autism and very hard to diagnose.  A friend of mine has spent the last 10 years putting her son in all kinds of state facility to get help for his odd and unusual violent behavior.  All the places she has taken him too return him home and say his is fine.  However, last night his mother lay dead and his step father is in critical condition because this now 15 year old boy went off his rocker with a pistol!  What do you know of this new diagnosed form of autism?

  2. krillco profile image93
    krillcoposted 5 years ago

    It is not 'new', it was recognized in the 1940's. It is not hard to diagnose at all. It would be extremely rare for a person with Asperger Syndrome to murder. The real diagnosis is likely something very different.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspergers_ … 2.80.937-1

    1. backporchstories profile image81
      backporchstoriesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      After reflecting I have to agree...this was the last diagnosis the boy recieved.

  3. odie_driver profile image61
    odie_driverposted 5 years ago

    Krillco is correct - Asperger's is not a "new diagnosis" of a form of Autism - it isn't really that hard to diagnose - there are specific criteria that professionals would look for. Generally people with Asperger's present only with the social deficits present in someone on the Autism Spectrum - which is why they have a different category.

    From the sounds of the tiny paragraph you've posted, the person very likely has something else - perhaps even Bi-polar, which is extremely difficult to diagnose as a child, and is categorized with violent (and seemingly random) outbursts.

    Its unfortunate that media labels those on the Autism Spectrum as violent - when really, those that have been have likely been violent due to other psychological issues, not because of their Autism. I wouldn't snap to labellling this person as Autistic, or having Asperger's syndrome simply because they behave odd, or are violent.

    1. backporchstories profile image81
      backporchstoriesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      To be honest the boy has been diagnosed with A to Z.....  Asperger was the last diagnosis, but treatments seemed to make things worse.  So sad.  However, it is good to have a clarification on what Asperger is.

    2. krillco profile image93
      krillcoposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      As a clinical counselor, I have so many kids misdiagnosed, and with the symptoms described, I would posit that you take a good look at PTSD. Visit my Hubs for more on PTSD in children as a result of interpersonal trauma.

    3. backporchstories profile image81
      backporchstoriesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That is so true.  Don't know why I did not think of that...but that may have been a label he had before.  PTSD  can cover a lot of disorders.  My spouse is PTSD.  I wrote a hub about living with a spouse who has PTSD.  Would appreciate your input ...

  4. Iheartautism profile image60
    Iheartautismposted 5 years ago

    Aspergers is anything but new. It is a sensory and sensitivity disorder that affects more people than is on record. The difference between autism and aspergers is that by current definition autism requires a delay in speech and language, whereas the definition for aspergers discludes that symptom. A person's behaviour regardless of disorder, mental stability, health or lifestyle is their own making and results from a combination of factors. A person shouldn't be judged based on their challenges.

    1. backporchstories profile image81
      backporchstoriesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I agree on the judgement!

  5. Rebecca2904 profile image77
    Rebecca2904posted 5 years ago

    Obviously I'm not a doctor or a mental health professional but to me it sounds like this boy doesn't have Asperger's so maybe it's something else? My little cousin has Asperger's and he's really kind of obsessed with the rules, what's right and what's wrong, and I really can't imagine him doing something that's 'wrong'. For a person with Asperger's the world is really quite black and white, so even if someone with it did go off the rails, I can't imagine them doing something like murdering someone, even though they do have difficulties with social interactions and displaying empathy.

    1. backporchstories profile image81
      backporchstoriesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I am sure he was miss diagnosed!

  6. Anomalous Minds profile image60
    Anomalous Mindsposted 5 years ago

    I know that people with Asperger Syndrome are more likely to be the victim of violence than to be violent themselves.  Simply put, we're easy targets because we're unusual and we don't pick up on social cues as well as others. 

    A few people (mis?)diagnosed with Aspergers committing violent crimes does not mean that Aspies tend to be violent.  Actually, according to that logic it would make more sense to say that Aspies should be wary of typical people because they are more violent than Aspies.  That wouldn't make for good news though, would it? 

    Even if this boy does have Asperger Syndrome (and he probably doesn't), it is not Aspergers that is making him violent.  All people have the capacity to commit acts of violence.  Some mental disorders do contribute to violent behavior, but Aspergers is not among them.  It is a syndrome - not a disorder.  Many of us are quite orderly, thank you very much!

 
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