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jump to last post 1-13 of 13 discussions (16 posts)

Does garlic powder have the any of the health benefits of fresh garlic?

  1. carol7777 profile image89
    carol7777posted 5 years ago

    Does garlic powder have the any of the health benefits of fresh garlic?

    Also-already peeled garlic, minced garlic in a jar or dry?

  2. profile image0
    An AYMposted 5 years ago

    I'm not sure the specifics of which processes break down the good stuff in garlic, but I believe the general consensus for foods is the more fresh the better.  Most processes of drying or preserving will probably involve applying heat, which will cause some of the organic molecules to break apart.

    But then again it could be that you could process it down until you primarily have a concentration of the desired component, with less relevant bits weeded out.

    So in retrospect I don't really know, and my answer isn't especially helpful.  But I hope you find out.

  3. DrMark1961 profile image98
    DrMark1961posted 5 years ago

    Since the compound in garlic that is responsible for many of its properties (allicin) is unstable when exposed to air, it should be used within three hours of being chopped. I realize that this is not easy and I admit that I keep minced garlic in my refrigirator and use it at times, like when I am cooking pasta. When I need to use garlic for a specific health condition, I peel and chop it.
    The only thing garlic powder should be used for is garlic bread. (In my opinion! There is a lot of controversy in this area.)

    1. loveofnight profile image82
      loveofnightposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I did not know about garlics instability and it is a good share indeed.I use a lot of garlic and was not aware of the fact that it looses potency after chopping. I mainly use the powder when I am being lazy, I may have to rethink that.

    2. grumpiornot profile image83
      grumpiornotposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Awesome answer. Any thoughts on whether garlic powder also contribute to the garlic-breath "situation" with the same power as fresh garlic?

  4. Historicus profile image60
    Historicusposted 5 years ago

    The trouble with garlic is that it starts growing just after it is harvested.  Right now my Siberian garlic has a green sprout in each clove as I use them.  Storage of garlic requires a space which is chilled and humidity controlled.  That is how commercial produce dealers store theirs.

    The granulated powder is just another way to have garlic flavor well after the clove would have rotted away.  Fresh garlic is the best for the organics you speak of BUT reasonable flavor can be achieved by using the granulated variety.

    Bon app├ętit!

  5. Handicapped Chef profile image78
    Handicapped Chefposted 5 years ago

    I do not think that either powder or fresh have the health benefits that we need to really help our bodies, not because it's not good for you but because it's not concentrated enough. Garlic for cooking is modified for cooking making it less concentrated I think you should go and buy a garlic supplement ...This is just my opinion.

    1. carol7777 profile image89
      carol7777posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Interesting information and that clears up things somewhat. Thanks for replying.

  6. StandingJaguar profile image79
    StandingJaguarposted 5 years ago

    I rarely use it, but when I do, garlic powder is not nearly as potent as freshly crushed garlic. I imagine this is a sign that it's "missing" something.

  7. epus profile image60
    epusposted 5 years ago

    As we have observed, garlic powder are exposed granules so contamination is present whereas fresh garlic has pure content inside that skin cover.

  8. algarveview profile image88
    algarveviewposted 5 years ago

    I don't think it is the same, like every other food - if you dry it or freeze it or whatever, it loses some of its benefits - not all, but some -and even when it comes to taste it is quite different, for me, at least. I use a lot of garlic while cooking, it's great for our heart, to keep it healthy, and I also love the taste it gives food, but while fresh... Dried garlic simply doesn't do it for me, I just don't like the taste of the food with it...

  9. edhan profile image60
    edhanposted 5 years ago

    Fresh garlic has the benefits and I sometimes eat raw garlic. When that happens, my wife avoid kissing me. Sob!

  10. profile image52
    anusha22posted 5 years ago

    ya it will have but less when compared to fresh one

  11. Cleo Rubino profile image59
    Cleo Rubinoposted 5 years ago

    yes, there is. It can be an anti-oxidant that can help us relieve from pain from our toothache and it is good for our body

  12. FSlovenec profile image59
    FSlovenecposted 5 years ago

    It is not the same as fresh garlic, the value of garlic is lost fairly quickly and the powder needs a preservative of some sort. so no

  13. LoisRyan13903 profile image82
    LoisRyan13903posted 5 years ago

    I wouldn't say garlic powder has many health benefits-especially it is high in sodium-not good if you have high blood pressure

 
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