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Does depression affect people more during the winter?

  1. aviannovice profile image90
    aviannoviceposted 4 years ago

    Does depression affect people more during the winter?

  2. LongTimeMother profile image94
    LongTimeMotherposted 4 years ago

    In a general sense, I would think yes. However I'm sure summer must also be depressing for people whose personal circumstances don't allow them to fully enjoy summer.

    1. aviannovice profile image90
      aviannoviceposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      So you don't feel it to always be a seasonal factor?.

  3. Jackie Lynnley profile image90
    Jackie Lynnleyposted 4 years ago

    I would think so since that brings the holidays which often causes depression. Think I read sometime about the lesser light also being a factor.

    1. aviannovice profile image90
      aviannoviceposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I had heard that, and it makes a lot of sense that these times would trigger it.

  4. EJ Lambert profile image72
    EJ Lambertposted 4 years ago

    That is a complicated question.  If you mean in northern climates where there is snow and such, then yes.  People by their very nature like to be outside in the fresh air and open spaces.  Being cooped up inside for long periods of time, while tolerable, can get monotonous and hard on the body.  On the flip side, if you live further south where the cold is not a problem, then I would say depression isn't either.

    1. aviannovice profile image90
      aviannoviceposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I just meant in general.  Thanks for your input, too.

  5. Solaras profile image100
    Solarasposted 4 years ago

    Yes, there is seasonal depression that is triggered by shorter days and less sunlight.  People in Northern areas tend to be more frequently affected as their days are substantially shorter in the winter.  A treatment that has had positive results has been to install lights behind the curtains to make it appear as though it is still daylight outside.  People cheered up a bit.

    1. aviannovice profile image90
      aviannoviceposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Glad to hear that the extra light helped people.  Do you know if lightbulbs that have more blue in their light cast(to emulate daylight) help?

  6. profile image52
    viola staggsposted 4 years ago

    Yes take it from someone who has massive depression disorder.The cold weather monthes are very painful.It seems you ache twice as much.The sun warms from the outside in if you know what I mean.
       Even if you never stick your head out the door the warmer days just seems to help some.No one want to be in the gray all the time.Sometimes the sun can burn through the gray in the summer.

    1. aviannovice profile image90
      aviannoviceposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Do you go to a warmer climate for the summer to help battle this in your instance?

  7. Fraise profile image62
    Fraiseposted 4 years ago

    I think it can do due to the evenings becoming darker much quicker especially if you live where i am...and  with less sunlight and dull chilly days and nights it can put a dampner down on your mood especially if you're not as active.

    1. aviannovice profile image90
      aviannoviceposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I used to live in Maine, so I understand what you mean.

  8. sagar phd profile image60
    sagar phdposted 4 years ago

    Depression is psychological disorder and it is so common that it is referred to as the "common cold"  of mental health ....and according to me the affect of depression is same in all the seasons....as it is a psychological thing and it doesn't matter whether it's summer or winter ....there are many depression tests that helps to identify the symptoms of depression.

    1. aviannovice profile image90
      aviannoviceposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      So then, you completely discredit SAD as a depressive disorder?

    2. sagar phd profile image60
      sagar phdposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      it's my personal opinion on this topic and of course SAD is a depressive disorder

    3. Borsia profile image46
      Borsiaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Clinical depression is most often caused by an imbalance in brain chemistry. So it is a psychological disorder with a physical root.

    4. aviannovice profile image90
      aviannoviceposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Borsia, will medication as well as counselling be successful in combating this, or is it not so simple as that?

    5. Borsia profile image46
      Borsiaposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Any really good shrink will tell you that it is a black art. If you are lucky meds alone can be the answer. For some therapy helps as well. For around 50% neither does much and therapy is all there is. It depends on how one reacts to meds.

  9. DDE profile image26
    DDEposted 4 years ago

    Weather can be depressing  especially if it is winter,  we have five months of winter in CROATIA and the worst is when it rains, can't get out and that can be depressing if you let it be.

    1. aviannovice profile image90
      aviannoviceposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Ouch!  That would really hurt me, not being able to tromp around the lake making new discoveries.  At least here in OK(USA), it generally won't rain the entire day.

  10. Borsia profile image46
    Borsiaposted 4 years ago

    The holiday season also has the highest suicide rate. So people definitely feel depression in winter.
    Clinical depression isn't seasonal for most but the added stresses of the holidays can compound problems for many.

    1. aviannovice profile image90
      aviannoviceposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I want to hear more about this, Bosia.  Can you expound a little more on this.

 
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