What causes some extremely intelligent people to be well.............UNEMPLOYABL

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  1. gmwilliams profile image83
    gmwilliamsposted 3 years ago

    What causes some extremely intelligent people to be well.............UNEMPLOYABLE?

    When one hears the word unemployable, people visualize a person with below average, even low intelligence.  They seldom visualize a very intelligent person being unemployable.  They reason that extremely intelligent people are never unemployable as they have the prerequisite education and intelligence to retain a job/career.

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/12276536_f260.jpg

  2. chuckandus6 profile image76
    chuckandus6posted 3 years ago

    Some times even with degrees and intelligence, even with hands.on training companies are looking for people with years of job experience in that field

    1. profile image50
      Ezkposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Other times, the mere preference of a boss is enough to fire an employee.  Then, the suddenly unemployed is burdened with finding employment, and explaining the reasons for termination - a stigma. Thank you at will contract!

  3. Amanda108 profile image92
    Amanda108posted 3 years ago

    Personality:

    Someone just may not be the right "fit" in a certain work environment.

    Or, intelligence means little if a person isn't willing to work hard or lacks ambition.

    They may be rude or inappropriate in extreme cases; if this is the case then in most fields, from what I've seen and how I feel personally, you could be Albert Einstein and still get kicked to the curb.

    More common are (intelligent) people who don't have the right social skills, which are sometimes very demanding in the interview and then more so later on in the job - be it in a business presentation, on the sales floor, handling employees, or being patient with pressing demands.

  4. word55 profile image69
    word55posted 3 years ago

    They may be strong in one area and week in another. They may be good in one aspect of character and bad in another.

  5. Efficient Admin profile image93
    Efficient Adminposted 3 years ago

    It could be that they have a high level of arrogance and may not have people skills to work with others.  If they are very intelligent but nobody likes to work with them and they are difficult to get along with, and word gets around in the industry, they may not get hired easily.

    1. profile image50
      Ezkposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      woow, it almost looks as if you are painting the portrait of Satan.

  6. pattyfloren profile image74
    pattyflorenposted 3 years ago

    The jobs that intelligent individuals apply for may be jobs that they are over-qualified for and the company may not be willing to pay that type of salary.  The jobs that offer large salaries are fewer than middle-class and entry-level jobs.  Most individuals have a shot of being offered a position with such high caliber, but there is probably a lot of competition.  So when that certain individual gets hired for an under-qualified job they may bring their arrogance with them.

    1. gmwilliams profile image83
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      +1.000,000,000,000,000,000 so true indeed!

    2. profile image50
      Ezkposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      could it be that being arrogant is in the mind of the beholder?
      I mean, you may call someone arrogant, whereas other people may just call it smart, or fast learner, etc.
      Peer pressure encourages conformity, especially when bosses are involved.

  7. peachpurple profile image84
    peachpurpleposted 3 years ago

    good question. My brother in law has a master, a degree for computer engineering. He was a assistant CEO before he resigned. Now, after so many years job hopping, he is still a programmer instead. His arrogance, ignorance resulted him in this state. He thinks that the company success was due to his effort. He was wrong.

  8. KEPitz1005 profile image61
    KEPitz1005posted 3 years ago

    Well, since I AM intelligent yet "hopelessly unemployed", I'll tell you why... I was laid off at age 51 in the middle of an economic recession. I applied for countless jobs every single day of the week, and actually got calls to schedule interviews for at least 75% of them... I have great skills & experience, so with daily interviews, surely I'd be hired in no time. Logical, right? Wrong. Once the interviewer met me, I could see their facial expressions change & felt the interview was just them 'going through the motions as opposed to actually INTERVIEWING. They saw a little grey hair and a few lines on my face & instantly I was no longer a candidate they wanted to seriously consider - despite my qualifications and steady employment history. I was simply too OLD. One company - who I'd applied to 3 different times and was interviewed each time - actually admitted that yes, it probably WAS an age discrimination issue even though that's illegal. After 17 months out of work, I got fewer call backs. According to labor statistics, chances of getting hired with a gap in employment history that long are less than 6%... IF your resume is even read. At 17 months, you're classified as hopelessly unemployed. I'm now 55 years old, and out of work since 2011. I only stand about a 1 1/2% chance of someone even glancing at my resume. I am by no means "unemployable". I'm in the best shape physically I've been in since my 30s, I'm always learning new things online or in a classroom, I'm very smart & learn things faster than most 21 year olds... But I have laugh lines on my face, and grey hair that I have to color just to make sure I have a chance!
    It's discrimination, it's illegal, and it's just wrong to dismiss someone who is qualified and mature!
    So yeah. Age is a factor in employability along with the gaps in your employment history.
    And let me tell you - it really sucks! The frustration is mind bending, and the depression & feelings of worthlessness & inadequacy are unbearable a lot of the time... So much so, that some just give up altogether.
    That's MY personal experience with this issue. It makes me angry because it's so grossly unfair, and this practice is a HUGE hindrance to the economic recovery of our country. Again -labor statistics confirm it.

    1. KEPitz1005 profile image61
      KEPitz1005posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      And by the way, I don't see myself as being self centered or arrogant in anyway. I've always worked hard, been reliable, and extremely flexible - willing to step in to do whatever needs to be done... And my salary expectations have never been ridicul

    2. gmwilliams profile image83
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      It is indeed UNFAIR.  It is beyond horrendous what you are going through.

    3. Cerulean Crayon profile image66
      Cerulean Crayonposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes! This is happening to me! I am 56. I've come to believe they don't want to waste training time and dollars for someone this close to retirement. One friend says the businesses are intimidated by my obvious abilities, which is possible.

    4. profile image50
      Ezkposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      The issue is that if you are "perceived" as smart, then you deserve to be an outcast. People will push their rationalizations as fact. Also, at will employment help exacerbating the situation. A baseless judgement becomes a cash issue once fired!

  9. tamarawilhite profile image92
    tamarawilhiteposted 3 years ago

    They expect to step into a perfect position at high pay with immediate impact to the organization.
    They find entry level positions with moderate pay and months to years of work before being as productive or recognized as they like.
    So they stay home.
    It is like the women who look for the perfect man, and alone at 40, think about the decent ones they left years ago.

 
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