What is the age that one should achieve some measurable career success?

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  1. gmwilliams profile image84
    gmwilliamsposted 3 years ago

    What is the age that one should achieve some measurable career success?

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  2. profile image0
    anubhavspeaksposted 3 years ago

    It is relative to the field one is in. For Pageants like Miss Universe, you probably need to make your mark in your twenties. If a man or a woman is into physical sports, then you should make your mark before the age of 35.

    For most other fields, I do not think that there is definitely an age by which one OUGHT to succeed because there are numerous examples of multi millionaires who were  broke in their thirties or artists and writers who didn't get their due until their fifties or even after their death. So unless you are into sports or something where youthfulness and agility is a must, I don't think there is any age by which one OUGHT to succeed. It can happen at any time!

    1. gmwilliams profile image84
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      FANTASTIC!

    2. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Excellent point about occupational choice. A pro tennis player should be making waves during their teenage years and early 20s. While a heart surgeon may just be getting his/her feet wet in their early 30s with a boatload of college loan debts.

  3. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 3 years ago

    I'm reluctant to put an "expiration date stamp" on anyone's dream.
    However I imagine most people achieve some amount of noteworthiness by age 35-40 in their career or profession.
    Nevertheless there are exceptions.
    Mark Zuckerberg founder of Facebook became a (billionaire) in his early 20s and Colonel Harland David Sanders born in 1890 sold his KFC business in 1964 for $2 Million at age 74.
    He founded the company in 1952 at age 62.
    Only the (individual) can decide when their time has passed to fulfill their dreams. It's not over until (you say so) or stop breathing.

    1. gmwilliams profile image84
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, that's true.  But on the average, measurable career success is from the age of 27-40.  After that, well........

  4. FatFreddysCat profile image97
    FatFreddysCatposted 3 years ago

    If you haven't achieved some level of success or status by age 40 in the professional world, you're pretty much screwed.

    ...and I just turned 45. Awwww, @#$%.

    1. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Pretty much after hitting a certain age companies/employers aren't going to invest time and training or in many cases even hire a person. This only leaves them with creative pursuits and entrepreneurship endeavors as a path to success. smile

    2. gmwilliams profile image84
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      What you both have elucidated is thus true indeed.  40 is the plateau of success for most people.  However to me(IMO), from 32-35 is when one should achieve some measurable success.  Don't you think so? To me, the EARLIER the BETTER!

  5. unvrso profile image92
    unvrsoposted 3 years ago

    By the age of five, your parents should already noticed your tendencies towards life.

    By the age of 15, you should already master most of the academic studies at school.

    By the age of 20, you should be studying a carreer at a university and by the age of 30, you should already have achieved career success

    1. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Sounds fairly aggressive especially in our current era. There are lots of 30 year olds with college degrees living with parents or waiting on tables. Very few 30 year olds in the U.S. would be considered successful. Success is rarely linear.

    2. gmwilliams profile image84
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I TOTALLY AGREE WITH THIS ASSESSMENT!  Most successful careerists have achieved success by age 30 at the most.  Many have achieved it earlier, esp. in the entertainment field!

    3. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Nevertheless MOST people are in the "rank and file". Very few people are in the 1% or 10% of very successful people. Only 1 in 5 people or 20% of Americans will ever earn $100k in a single year. I imagine most will be over the age of 30. smile

 
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