Cancer and Diet

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  1. profile image45
    articledirectory1posted 8 years ago

    The issue of is paramount to your health. Without feeding the body the ingredients it needs, it simply cannot produce the processes that combat the cancer.

    Firstly, when looking at nutrition for cancer, we need to understand the role of pancreatic enzymes. These enzymes, including trypsin & chymotrypsin, play a major role in halting the formation of tumours. Unfortunately these enzymes also play a part in digesting animal proteins, so if our diets are too high in animal protein, then our supply of pancreatic enzymes is tied up in digestion and not available for halting tumours.

    Secondly, we need to understand the role of B17 (hydrocyanic acid) in our diets and specifically its interaction with cancer. B17 interacts with the very large amounts of beta-glucosidase in cancer cells to produce hydrogen cyanide and benzaldehyde. These two poisons combine into an extremely deadly poison that targets cancer cells. The reason that it doesn't target healthy cells is that although they have small quantities of beta-glucosidase, they also contain rodonase, a substance that cancer cells do not have, that breaks the poison down into compounds that actually assist the bodies immune system! Clever, hey!?

    So we start to see the crucial relationship between cancer and diet!

    At this point it is interesting to note that one of the most concentrated sources of natural B17 is apricot kernels - that is the kernel INSIDE the apricot seed itself. However it is our understanding that the sale of apricot kernels is illegal in some countries, including ours. Consequently if you are lucky enough to get your hands on a large supply, it will be by word of mouth connections. However if you are prepared to ask friends to eat a lot of apricots or go on a mission to make frozen or bottled apricots, or maybe apricot jam, there is no law to our knowledge that says you can't eat them. The recommended dosage for people with cancer is up to 60 a day, but starting with 2 per meal and adding one per meal daily to ensure there is no intolerance.

    Side note: Apparently the bureaucratic argument for making sale of them illegal is that they will poison you as they are a cyanide compound, (hydrocyanic acid) and produce another cyanide, (hydrogen cyanide) but they fail to follow through and tell us that the hydrogen cyanide then combines with the rodonase to make compounds that actually boost the immune system. Following this logic I have to wonder why then that Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin!) has not been banned. You may be aware they feed B12 to anemia patients!

    So, we can address a diet for cancer from specific angles. Firstly by adding whatever natural sources we can find that contain B17, secondly by reducing (not cutting out!) animal protein intake, and thirdly by adding nutrients to our diets in their most easily & effectively absorbed forms ie in foods.

    The bottom line is our body is at our mercy and what we put in to it can either help or hinder its ability to help us. The beauty of becoming aware of the interaction of cancer and diet is that it is something we can do for ourselves, thereby empowering us in the fight against this horrid invader!

    1. nikki1 profile image59
      nikki1posted 8 years agoin reply to this

      Never smoke. Sticking to the food pyramid can help. Knowing what you health numbers are cholesterol,. Being proactive as well. Avoiding fatting foods and create a healthy exercise routine. Such as dancing,. Recommended close to an hour.

  2. goldenpath profile image72
    goldenpathposted 8 years ago

    Although, I appreciate your determination and drive to bring an awareness to the problem and risk, I still remain neither for nor against maintaining a "diet" as a direct deterrent for cancer.  There are people out there who have spent their entire lives living the great health diet, and have still acquired and died from cancer.  On the flipside, there are those who have smoked all their lives and have not upheld a healthy diet, and have lived to see over a hundred.  Diseases attack us, sometimes at random and sometimes by design.  I am completely open to persuasion one way or the other, but at this time I see no benefit in getting oneself uptight about their intake out of fear of cancer.

    I did enjoy the post though.  Thank you for bringing it to our attention.

    1. urba profile image61
      urbaposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      It was observed that Diet  -everyday vegetables  plus alcohol and tobaco lowers chance of cancer to 0,6 and helthy diet (-everyday vegetables  no alcohol and  no tobaco) lowers probability of acncer to 0,4. Why not to zero? Becouse of poluted surrounding, virus, aflatoxin etc.

  3. Uninvited Writer profile image82
    Uninvited Writerposted 8 years ago

    Yet, people who do get cancer sometimes do all this...

  4. h.a.borcich profile image57
    h.a.borcichposted 8 years ago

    As for the original post : The human body is very complex. There is a massive balance of all kinds of nutrients at work. Old farmers have notoriously eaten diets high in fats and they aren't recognised as an at risk group for cancer. Studies are needed.
    If I had to bet on what ingested substances most effect a likelyhood for cancer, I would bet on the high sugars, lack of raw fruits and veggies, and the contaminants applied to foods.
    I agree with Golden and Uninvited - cancer also is random and some people escape the diagnosis their habits prefer. Others follow healthy guidelines yet are fighting cancer.
    I hope you will be making some hubs about diet as it pertains to cancer. Holly

  5. fucsia profile image57
    fucsiaposted 8 years ago

    The relationship between diet and cancer exists and this is known, but every individual is genetically different and  is different the way which food interact in degenerative or repairers processes. This is why we can not generalize (even if a healthy diet always follows the same ,and very important,rules )

 
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