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What's your favorite post-apocalyptic novel?

  1. Georgie Lowery profile image95
    Georgie Loweryposted 5 years ago

    What's your favorite post-apocalyptic novel?

    I read a lot of this kind of fiction, and I'm looking for something interesting. It doesn't have to involve zombies, I like stuff like The Stand and The Postman. I also like the new wave of teen dystopian future books like The Hunger Games. Help a girl out?

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  2. nishlaverz profile image61
    nishlaverzposted 5 years ago

    I'm a fan of the old dystopian works like H.G Wells' The Time Machine. Which is  one of the earliest Post Apocalyptic works.

    My other Favorites are The Running Man by Stephen King (It will actually say by Richard Bachman on the book)

    Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell

    1. nishlaverz profile image61
      nishlaverzposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      If you like new works and are not bothered about them being by established authors then pop along to www.writing.com. There are lots of great stories to read.

    2. Georgie Lowery profile image95
      Georgie Loweryposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I've read The Time Machine, good stuff! I think I have an account at writing.com, but I haven't been there in ages. Thanks for the info! smile

  3. dmhenderson profile image60
    dmhendersonposted 5 years ago

    Cormac McCarthy's _The Road_ is a good one. One of the most fun is John Varley's _Millennium_.

    1. Georgie Lowery profile image95
      Georgie Loweryposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The Road is on my Kindle wishlist, I loved the movie! Haven't heard of the other one, but I will check it out. Thank you! smile

  4. JKenny profile image94
    JKennyposted 5 years ago

    Earth Abides by George R. Stewert- such a fantastic story that not only covers the human dynamics of a post apocalyptic world, but also goes into detail about how the natural world recovers without the overwhelming presence of humans.

    1. Georgie Lowery profile image95
      Georgie Loweryposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I've never heard of it, but I will put it on my to-do list. It sounds like a good read.

      Also, look at you with your 100 Hubber score! Awesome sauce! smile

  5. duffsmom profile image61
    duffsmomposted 5 years ago

    Matched, Divergent, Delirium, Forest of Hands and Teeth (Zombie Trilogy by Carrie Ryan)  Hunger Games remains my favorite but I would put Divergent as a close second, and the second one in the trilogy is Insurgent and third to come.

    1. Georgie Lowery profile image95
      Georgie Loweryposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Somehow, I've heard of Carrie Ryan. I hate starting a series when all the books aren't out yet, though! I will put them on my wishlist so I'll remember them. Thank you for answering!

    2. duffsmom profile image61
      duffsmomposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Georgie, all the Carrie Ryan books are out and they are awesome. I love her writing.  Forest of Hands and Teeth, The Dead-Tossed Waves, and The Dark and Hollow Places. I loved all of them.

    3. Georgie Lowery profile image95
      Georgie Loweryposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Which one of her books do you suggest I start with?

    4. duffsmom profile image61
      duffsmomposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      The books I listed are not all by the same author.  Carrie Ryan wrote The Forest of Hands and Teeth bk1, The Dead-Tossed Waves bk2 and The Dark and Hollow Places bk3.  Forest of Hands and Teeth is bk1 and excellent.

  6. Stephen Ulibarri profile image60
    Stephen Ulibarriposted 5 years ago

    The Dark Tower, Stephen King. Not exactly post apocalyptic, but in a sense, it is.

    1. Georgie Lowery profile image95
      Georgie Loweryposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Somehow I'd forgotten about that. Thank you for reminding me!

  7. profile image0
    Old Empresarioposted 5 years ago

    I would say either H.G. Wells' Time Machine or Aldous Huxley's Brave New World.

    1. Georgie Lowery profile image95
      Georgie Loweryposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I've read Time Machine, but not the other. I'll add it to my wishlist. Thank you for the recommendation!

  8. Docmo profile image93
    Docmoposted 5 years ago

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/7069074_f260.jpg

    Walter M Miller's only published novel, A Canticle for Leibowitz, is a true masterpiece of post apocalyptic fiction.( He did write a sequel towards the end of his life but it was completed by Terry Bisson, while ' ST Leibowitz and the Wild horse woman'  a good immensely readable novel , it merely pales in comparison as the original was so dazzling) A prolific sci-fi short story writer, the author based this novel on three stories he wrote for the magazine of fantasy and sf. Acclaimed by critics and equally loved by readers ( Ithas never been out of print for the past 50 odd years- it was published in 1960).

    Set 600 years after a  global nuclear meltdown that leads to the destruction of 20th century civilization, the survivors have turned against any learning or science as they blame the end of civilization to the learned men who led to it. The backlash is called 'simplification' where anyone who can read or exhibits any learning is attacked by mobs and killed. A Jewish electrical engineer Leibowitz from the US Military who survived the war, converts to a monastic life and secretly preserves knowledge in the form of old manuscripts in a hidden military base in the Southwest. He is eventually found, killed and attains martyrdom. The books remain hidden as a means of eventual resurrection of civilisation that has descended to dark ages. The story then leaps to 26th, 32nd and 38th centuries. Each storyline captures the search for and the eventual discovery of Leibowitz's lost abbey and the knowledge within, rebuilding of civilization in whatever form and the aftermath.

    I read this as a 13 year old and it completely blew me away. I re-read this book every few years to remind myself how great stories combine so many themes, science and apocalypse, a quest, heroes and villains, fall and redemption, hope and loss while still being grippingly entertaining. You wont be disappointed - I think Postman, the Book of Eli and others have borrowed heavily from this influential original.

    1. Stephen Ulibarri profile image60
      Stephen Ulibarriposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I own this book! Now that you've convinced me to read it, I definitely will!

    2. Georgie Lowery profile image95
      Georgie Loweryposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I've been looking at this book for a long time. I'll put it on my to-do list, thank you!

  9. Anne-Marie Yerks profile image75
    Anne-Marie Yerksposted 5 years ago

    "Ender's Game" is really good. There's also the Russian novel "We." Both are easy to read and pretty short.

  10. j.brown profile image81
    j.brownposted 4 years ago

    I am Legend by far!  Richard Matheson wrote this way ahead of his time.  It should not have been the film that it was and the film itself, I personally do not relate with the novel.  I AM LEGEND is the most legendary and stands the true test of time.

 
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