Name a great poet, author or playwright who influenced you to write.

Jump to Last Post 1-23 of 23 discussions (57 posts)
  1. amiebutchko profile image87
    amiebutchkoposted 3 years ago

    Name a great poet, author or playwright who influenced you to write.

    I'm assuming that most of us here are writers because we at one point in our growing up thought literature was an amazing thing.  Who's your favorite poet or author or what is your favorite work? 

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/11900927_f260.jpg

  2. dohn121 profile image82
    dohn121posted 3 years ago

    In reference to the pic you posted, Shakespeare was the catalyst to my writing poetry (or what I thought to be poetry) as far back as the ninth grade.  In hindsight, what I was really writing was lyrical prose and in some cases haikus.  Before Will Shakespeare, my heroes, mentors, and luminaries were Ray Bradbury, Roald Dahl, and Shel Silverstein.  They showed me The Way and left me bread crumbs to follow--some too small for even a mouse to devour--but bread crumbs nevertheless.  Their ability to tell a story, describe the fantastic, rhyme with both reason and humor chiseled away the pieces of me that were lost and sculpted me into the writer that I am today...Ernest Hemingway polished me up thereafter.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Wow.  A writer you are; the real deal.  Its funny because you don't really meet every day people who have a passion for poetry and the greats.  I love "hearing" you speak of these men like they are a song for your heart.  You are blessed with this!

    2. Rod Marsden profile image74
      Rod Marsdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Ray Bradbury is an excellent choice.

  3. tmbridgeland profile image82
    tmbridgelandposted 3 years ago

    I actually started writing when I read the first novel of a new writer, and thought, "I can write better than that!" I figured if she could get published with modest skills, so could I. Reading her novel, and being able to see the weaknesses and flaws took away a lot of the mystery of writing for me, and made me see that it was something I could also do.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      You were inversely inspired!  I get that.  That's great.  When you can write, you just can write.  There is definitely a moment when you realize that it is not something everyone else can do.  Magical in a way.  Interesting, original and inspiring!

  4. profile image0
    sheilamyersposted 3 years ago

    I can't answer this with the name of published author. Well, maybe she is, but if so I've never read any of her books or even heard about them. Since she wouldn't be on any list of famous writers, perhaps I shouldn't mention her, but I must. The person who most inspired me to write was my college professor L.A.Smith. I had for English Comp II and Technical Writing. I never enjoyed writing anything up until I sat in her classes. She was the one who taught me to write about the things I know and about which I have a passion. If it wasn't for her, I wouldn't write anything unless it was required for work. Because of her, I write HP articles and have published several books.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Gosh.  What a lady of impact.  What a difference she made!  I wish I could ever do so much for someone.  That woman must have been one great teacher.  How wonderful.  Thank you for sharing.

    2. JayeWisdom profile image91
      JayeWisdomposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I love that you paid tribute to Prof. Smith's influence on your writing, Sheila. Teachers can be more inspiring than anyone by encouraging students to write.

  5. Teeuwynn Woodruff profile image95
    Teeuwynn Woodruffposted 3 years ago

    The first author that really made me see I could use my imagination to create something was a fantasy author called Anne McCaffrey. She wrote a series of novels called the Dragonriders of Pern. The fantasy world she created perfectly sparked my imagination as a young girl.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Isn't it amazing how much an impact a great writer can have on a child?  You must have a creative mind; something I marvel at.  I am going to look up those books for my daughter.  These writers made such a difference!  Its kinda beautiful!

  6. alancaster149 profile image87
    alancaster149posted 3 years ago

    A number of authors in my dim distant past may have shaped the way I write. Let's start off with the anonymous scribe who set 'Beowulf' to vellum (although he took it through the 'car wash' - i.e., cleaned out the heathen element in the original telling), as also Snorri Sturlusson (not for his writing style as such, but for his grasp of history); C S Forrester for his 'Hornblower' series; Bernard Cornwell's 'Sharpe' books and the 'Last Kingdom' series of stories of Uhtred of Baebbanburh; various books by Ernest Hemingway, particularly 'A Farewell to Arms'; Erich Maria Remarque's 'The Black Obelisk' was a biting criticism of the Brownshirts in the 1930's; last but not least, Poul Anderson's rendition of 'Hrolf Kraki's Saga' (much better and more detailed narrative than the Penguin version). 
    Owzat?!

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      You have such an amazing command of what influenced you!  It doesn't seem to be a dim past at all!!!!  But clearly, these are all great works and I love how you can call them up just off the cuff.  Powerful.  Going to read my "Farewell to Arms" now!

    2. Rod Marsden profile image74
      Rod Marsdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I thought the Hornblower series was great. The days of the tall sails.

  7. Seafarer Mama profile image90
    Seafarer Mamaposted 3 years ago

    My high school English Lit teacher inspired me with the writing and poetry of Edgar Allen Poe. I have a whole collection of his works, and so does my husband. Will Shakespeare's sonnets and plays were also works that I love, as were the writings of more modern poets such as Emily Dickenson. Another playwright I have grown to admire is George Bernard Shaw. His biographical play about Joan of Arc is one I can read over and over.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, I love these authors as well.  Isn't it amazing how talented singular individuals can be?  I love Poe.  And Shakespeare, well, I loved learning all that.  I will have to check out George Bernard Shaw.  Thank you!

    2. Rod Marsden profile image74
      Rod Marsdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      A good selection of writers.

  8. Ashley Ryan P profile image78
    Ashley Ryan Pposted 3 years ago

    Definitely Poe.

    I had a niche for writing short stories and poetry regarding more darker and horrific settings. More often than not, I was being told I was disturbed and needed mental evaluation. Maybe. Maybe not. But I did always find myself reading a LOT of Poe as a teenager and knew I wanted to be just like him.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Poe is hauntingly awesome!  I think that is very cool that you have that kind of creativity.  Definitely would appeal to young audiences today!  "Nevermore!"  Just love his lyric rhythm.

  9. Jodah profile image89
    Jodahposted 3 years ago

    I have always loved poetry from a young age and the poet that influenced me for the greatest part of my life and still inspires me is the Australian bush poet A.B.Banjo Patterson. I have written a tribute poem to him and his work. As far as fiction authors I would have to say the first I read and was inspired by was Edgar Rice Burroughs of Tarzan and John Carter of Mars fame.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I'm going to have to check out those writers!!!  I love how so many people have been influenced so deeply by such different writers.  Thank you for sharing!

    2. Rod Marsden profile image74
      Rod Marsdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Strangely enough Patterson was one of the first Australians to write science fiction. One short story about a mechanical salesman but still...Burroughs is a great choice.

  10. M. T. Dremer profile image96
    M. T. Dremerposted 3 years ago

    There were quite a few authors who influenced me growing up. But none as much as J. K. Rowling. In K-12 school, it's easy to fall into the mentality that reading is 'school work only'. I had always liked reading, to some extent, but it was the Harry Potter series that showed me a book could surpass other forms of entertainment. That one could read from sun up to sun down and barely notice. That had a profound impact on me.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      JK Rowling's life story really is amazing.  There are such talents in this world.  I have always wanted to read those books!

  11. Chris Neal profile image78
    Chris Nealposted 3 years ago

    Ernest Hemingway. I read The Old Man and the Sea when I was only, like, nine or ten years old. I had read great writing before that, and since of course, but that book in particular, as well as For Whom the Bell Tolls and The Sun Also Rises, showed me that you could write a powerful sentence that was still lean and spare. My own style has never been that clean, but when I need to remember that "less is more," I always go back to the Old Man, both literally and metaphorically.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Oh my Gosh!  I totally try to remember the same thing: Hemmingway and short sentences.  I am not, as well, predisposed to write like that, but I try to remind myself the same thing.  But I have yet to read his works - I need to do that!

  12. Rod Marsden profile image74
    Rod Marsdenposted 3 years ago

    I can't just name one writer. Various writers at various times have had their impact on me. As playwrights go I have been influenced by Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream, Macbeth), Bertolt Brecht (The Caucasian Chalk Circle, Mother Courage), and Arthur Miller (All My Sons, The Crucible). An Englishman, a German and an American. On the Australian front there was  Ray Lawler (Summer of the Seventeenth Doll) and Robert. J. Merritt (The Cake Man). All five showed and still show what is possible to do on stage.

    As for poet I suppose Alfred Tennyson (UK) with his poem Flower in the Crannied Wall. In this 19th Century poem you manage to have the world of the microscope and also the telescope described in the wonder of a flowering plant along with the question of how we and God figure into all of this. Not bad going at all.

    In terms of the novel I grew up with Charles Dickens (UK), Robert. E. Howard (USA) and Isaac Asimov (USA). Later on I became as fan of Terry Pratchett (UK) and his disc world books. Dickens is best remembered for his Christmas short stories such as A Christmas Carol. He also wrote The Old Curiosity Shop and Oliver Twist. Robert E. Howard is best remembered for his creation of Conan and also Red Sonja. In terms of Australian literature it is hard to go past Albert Facey's A Fortunate Life and The Mango Tree by Ronald McKie. Then there's 1984 by George Orwell (UK) that has had a profound and lasting affect on me.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Oh!  Your answer makes me want to go out and read, read, read.  I don't want to miss any of these critical works.  I wonder at the talents of the past - they make me feel so small this morning!!!!!  But I love them all....

    2. Rod Marsden profile image74
      Rod Marsdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      A Fortunate Life deals with an Australian who went to the First World War so it is a very appropriate read for 2014. Every year it seems someone comes up with a new film version of A Christmas Carol.

  13. Old-Empresario profile image82
    Old-Empresarioposted 3 years ago

    If I were a real writer Ernest Hemingway would inspire me most, because he taught me anyone can write a publishable novel. The best fictional authors of high literature I have read consistently are Turgenev and Dostoyevsky, but they aren't my favorite personally. I just respect their brilliant writing, though I am not particularly interested in their subjects. Joseph Conrad consistently wrote books on subjects that most appealed to me and he also had a brilliant style. Heart of Darkness was such a short novel, but such a good one once I read it as an adult and actually understood it. I also liked Lord Jim and Nostromo. Conrad is probably my favorite foreign author. My favorite American author (and favorite American) is easily Gore Vidal. He basically had two subjects on which he wrote. One was history from the standpoint of those in power. His other novels (which I think he preferred to write) were typically whimsical and poked fun at subjects like human sexuality, media and religion. I am more partial to his historical novels.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      You are so informed and well read.  You have me wanting to read all these works.  I'm sure you do them justice as they sound tremendously influential.  I loved The Death of Ivan Illich.  I loved his title and how it represented the story.

    2. Rod Marsden profile image74
      Rod Marsdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Heart of Darkness is a great little book as you say. Apocalypse Now was roughly based on ideas from it.

  14. profile image60
    Edwin Brownposted 3 years ago

    Mark Twain and Flannery O'Conner   Mark Twain for his humor, and O'Conner for her keen insight into human nature.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I  need to get to reading!!!  There is so much to appreciate!

  15. kevin murphy-87 profile image80
    kevin murphy-87posted 3 years ago

    Chaucer! When i studied Chaucer's Canterbury tales in school it inspired me to write a story that rhymes. I quickly gave up but enjoyed trying so it helped me on my path to writing and enjoying the process.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Love Chaucer!  What a great class in college that was.  I miss being able to read and learn like that...

  16. Tusitala Tom profile image65
    Tusitala Tomposted 3 years ago

    I grew up in an age when radio was king (TV not yet in homes) and comic books and access to a public libary were the main ways of influence for children.  So I guess one could say comics with pictures, then comics without pictures.  I recall a book containing four stories of Canadian animals: a Caribour, a Lynx, a beaver and bear,   Those got the imagination going so much that I attempted writing my first book around twelve years of age.  it was, of course, too much of a challenge at the time.  It took another twenty years before I successfully completed my first novel.

    Then there were the stories read out or told orally from memory by our school teachers as a treat:  Tom Sawyer, Hucklbury Finn by Mark Twain, for example.  It is from these I developed my own passion for oral storytelling to audiences.

    There followed such authors as Jack London, Robert Louis Stephenson.   Later, as a twenty-year old, John Steinbeck, Ernest Hemingway.   I was also into everything Ernest Gann wrote because I got a job as an aeradio operator after my time in the navy.  Gann wrote on both the sea and the air.

    Poetry?   The Ryme of the Ancient Mariner.  Alfred Noyes, The Highwaymen.  The Man from Snowy River, Banjo Patterson.  These poems are stories which creates visual images along with emotion.

    I found Shakespeare too challenging to read for pleasure though, of course, I had to study certain plays and write critiques on them to pass various English examinations.   But I cannot recall any particular author that really...well...maybe Steinbeck.  His Cannery Row and Sweet Thursday kept me very amused all through.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I love your unique answer.  I didn't really think about oral storytelling and the impact of pictures.  Of course, both those things could be equally influential. I love the span of time of great authors.  I like to think all writers are connected.

    2. Rod Marsden profile image74
      Rod Marsdenposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I agree with Tom when it comes to Shakespeare. I never did read Shakespeare 'cold'. I got involved in theatre and that way the scenes and the characters came to life. Jack London (The Call of the Wild) and Paterson...great choices...

    3. profile image60
      Edwin Brownposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I would have to say that we are clicking on many of the same authors.  And like you, I never got to really like Shakespeare.  I was more into the moderns you mentioned.  Mark Twain was high on my list.  I am also fond of Walker Percy.

  17. SilentMagenta profile image70
    SilentMagentaposted 3 years ago

    Maya angelou is my favorite poet. She write with passion and a true love for her poetry.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      She wrote so beautifully.  A truly amazing talent.

  18. The Rebeldefect profile image61
    The Rebeldefectposted 3 years ago

    Roald Dahl DEFINITELY influenced me to write smile
    His stories were a part of my childhood.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I have never read him before!  I will have to check out his works.

    2. The Rebeldefect profile image61
      The Rebeldefectposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      You definitely have to! You have a sad childhood if you haven't read his works tongue jkjk xD

  19. Subhra Thakur profile image74
    Subhra Thakurposted 3 years ago

    Well i read a lot of jefferey archer and john grism, and then my life took some very unexpected turns which made me consider writing as an option, though I'm only a teen, but i have had my share of experience enough to keep anyone thrilled for days

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Well that is a very good thing for a writer!  Good luck in your pursuits!!!

    2. Subhra Thakur profile image74
      Subhra Thakurposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      thanks a lot

  20. Darla Dwire profile image60
    Darla Dwireposted 3 years ago

    It was Edgar Allen Poe. The first poem I had ever read that completely transformed my way of thinking about writing was his Poem "Spirits of the dead" Awakened me inside and out. I then began to dabble in poetry myself. Love to write it. A strong release for me.

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, Poe is awesome - especially this time of year!!!!!

  21. jponiato profile image83
    jponiatoposted 3 years ago

    Patrick McManus.  Don't know if you'd call him a great writer, but I love his humorous take on outdoor adventures.  Titles like "They Shoot Canoes, Don't They" and "Never Sniff a Gift Fish."

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Sounds like a funny writer!  I will check him out!  Thanks for answering!!!

  22. manatita44 profile image83
    manatita44posted 3 years ago

    Well, I was influenced by many Bards from an early age. Purely because I liked reading, I suppose. My advice to writers are usually to write, write, write .... read, read, read ... because this is what all the great writers say and what I did without thinking.

    So yes, Keats, Wordsworth, Shakespeare, Milton, Kipling, Shelly, Blake ... Emily Dickenson, Wilcox, Poe and Bradbury ... Wadsworth ..

    Finally, I give all credit to my Guru Sri Chinmoy. I have never met someone a tiny bit as prolific in so many fields of endeavour and the closest to him would also be spiritual poets like Rumi, Tagore, Mira, Rabia, etc. Check some out. Happy New Year!!

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I agree about the reading, reading, reading.  I always notice that when I read more, I write so much more fluidly as well, perhaps picking up little pearls from the authors' styles I have been submerged in.  Happy New Year's!

    2. manatita44 profile image83
      manatita44posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, it happens, Amie, and stays with you without knowing until you need them. So many people, including atheists, quote from spiritual mystics of long, long ago without thinking. Just because they heard and read it somewhere. Much Peace!

  23. Mars M profile image60
    Mars Mposted 3 years ago

    My first favorite author was Jaqueline Wilson because I grew up reading her books and novels. I thought, if she can do it, why not me?
    So I just had a bash at poetry and creative eriting and books, and it just turned out to be the right thing!
    Thanks to Jaqueline! <3

    1. amiebutchko profile image87
      amiebutchkoposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I'll have to look up that author!  She must have written some seriously great stuff to inspire you so!  Thank you for answering!

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)