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jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (8 posts)

Do you think honest person always suffer?

  1. profile image60
    ezba29posted 23 months ago

    Do you think honest person always suffer?

    Is it possible for honest person can survive in this world?  Why they are struggling though noone ready to accept?

  2. Alessio Ganci profile image70
    Alessio Ganciposted 23 months ago

    I don't think so. If you are 100% honest and disposed to suffer anything, obviously other people may take advantage of it. But if someone is honest and, at the same time, ready to become "evil" when it has to do with "evil people" who want to take advantage of him, he can be honest while being also respected by other people.

  3. yssazambo profile image60
    yssazamboposted 23 months ago

    For me, it's a no. Actually in contrast, I think it is the person who is dishonest that suffers the most. A dishonest person tells people what they want to hear which they think may give the other person positive emotions. However, otherwise could be felt by the liars. Sometimes it may not affect them right away, but soon enough, it would make them feel guilt, remorse, and even regrets. The truth always comes out they say, and that is always true. Dishonesty can cause a bigger disaster compared to just telling the truth in the first place.

    It is the other way around for honest people. At first, they will feel negatively especially if what message they want to relay is bad news. But after a long term, they will feel good for not hiding anything.

  4. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 23 months ago

    Everyone lies or has lied first of all whether it's experience on their resume or about how they feel about certain topics with respect to who they are talking to. Therefore what we are really talking about is people who are "predominantly honest".
    No, I don't believe most "suffer" for being honest. However as one old adage goes: "It's not what you say but how you say it."
    Having said that no matter who you are there will be people who like you and others who will dislike you. Everyone suffers in life at times.

  5. WordCrafter09 profile image76
    WordCrafter09posted 23 months ago

    Sometimes what is "honest" is not accurate, so the first thing to think about when it comes to the importance, value and/or disadvantages of being honest is to recognize that there is "honest", then there's "objective/fair", and then there's also (again) "accurate".

    It can be hard to tell the difference between someone who is being honest but believes the wrong thing, someone who is being honest but can't/won't overcome his own ego/interests enough to step outside of those things and get a more objective/fair/accurate picture of what one sees as "the truth", and someone who is just out-and-out lying for one reason or another.

    Over the course of my adult life I've seen times when I would have done better to lie than to aim to present a fair, objective, accurate, and honest picture (complete with being careful not to include stuff I couldn't possibly know; but while kids often lie because they're only concerned about their own, little, individual, "picture"; grown-ups most often are part of a picture that involves people other than just themselves.

    So, while there are situations in which lying (or presenting inaccuracy) may actually serve the individual and/or his interests/ego better than being honest (with others and/or himself) would; it can cause serious harm/damage to those with whom someone shares a "picture".

    How honest and/or brutally honest someone should be generally depends on the situation, the issue, and the people involved; but there may be nothing more destructive than an inaccuracy (or lots of them) presented as "honest"(or worse, "brutally honest").

    Grown-ups are supposed to be careful with what they allow to pass for the truth/facts about someone/something.  Before they allow themselves to call something "true" they're supposed to step outside their ego, interests, and/or emotions and think like a judge, a reporter, and a scientist before deciding what is true about their individual picture.

    If they do that they can place a good amount of confidence in what they see as "the truth", and if they truly care about someone/something other than just their own interests/ego then it will become clear that there shouldn't be room for inaccuracies that others (or life) can punch holes in and that will ultimately lead to one or another "whole picture" to become distorted and/or to fall apart.

  6. MelangeSpace1 profile image44
    MelangeSpace1posted 23 months ago

    I heard from someone I consider a friend once, that life is a tragedy for those who feel, but a comedy for those who think.... honest people don't suffer because they are honest, they perhaps suffer because they have expectations that other will be honest as well.

  7. eirofficial3112 profile image85
    eirofficial3112posted 23 months ago

    I do believe it's a yes. Anyone suffers in this world regardless whether it's the truth or a lie.

    Socially speaking, anyone within moral's perspective would say being dishonest is bad and telling the truth is good. Though the boundaries of such would depend differently.

    Anyways, it is indeed possible for an honest person to survive, though hurdles and obstacles may come in the way especially in the issues of 'bluntness', 'delicacy', and 'insensitivity'.

  8. roselinsojan profile image56
    roselinsojanposted 23 months ago

    Honest people suffer more because God love them."Jesus"  suffered in this world.

 
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