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jump to last post 1-22 of 22 discussions (22 posts)

I know this is controversial, but it is a honest question, I promise. Why does o

  1. Laura Thykeson profile image69
    Laura Thykesonposted 8 years ago

    I know this is controversial, but it is a honest question, I promise. Why does our country feel the

    I know this is controversial, but it is a honest question, I promise. Why does our country feel the need to force democracy on countries that have lived under religious laws for thousands of years? I have asked several people and it has always ended up with an explosion of anger.

  2. seyiari profile image58
    seyiariposted 8 years ago

    religious law is quite different from democratic law, even Jesus said give unto ceaser  what is meant for him and ive unto God what is meant for Him.i don't think we need any prophet to tell us that  democratic rule is better than religion rule .

  3. thesecondadvent profile image58
    thesecondadventposted 8 years ago

    My Dear Sweet Friends,

    This country, having been founded upon the Christian  principles of tolerance as a result of intolerance in England, hast concluded that strict religious rule is intolerable.  Therefore, we built our government upon the rule of wealth and the presumption of equality. 

    So, when we comest upon a nation that is not one of tolerance we reject it. We believe, mistakenly, that democracy, as we see it, is both of tolerance and equality.  We doth practice these to some extent, but democracy is not a complete fact of life in this country. 

    Notice that we use the rule of wealth in governing.  To rule according unto wealth is inequality, yet it is true in America.  Notice how in some countries we doth not bother because of the wealth therein.  Such as Saudi Arabia.

  4. Quilligrapher profile image83
    Quilligrapherposted 8 years ago

    Hi Laura,
    I see nothing in our foreign policy to suggest that its purpose is to promote democracy or to eliminate theocracies.  I only see policies designed to increase US power and influence in the world.  Their sole purpose is to promote US interests.
    Q.

  5. terced ojos profile image65
    terced ojosposted 8 years ago

    You have elements within the United States of a religious nature who believe that their God is with them; likewise that they can do no evil. These people by and large feel that they have been  entitled by God to be the judges of cultures that are not in their minds "Christian enough." So when members of these groups deem a country, a culture as something that is against God they will usually spare no expense in first judging that country which from their perspective is a perogative imbued them by God. Secondly they will mount a campaign using the political arena to launch their military at said culture or country. These groups are often manipulated by the governments they are citizens of who has ulterior motives for invading other countries. As Quilligrapher posted before me to promote U.S. interests.  Ultimately they are pawns used as leverage as the government sees fit.

  6. Laura Thykeson profile image69
    Laura Thykesonposted 8 years ago

    All very interesting answers and some differing viewpoints. I can't seem to understand why our government seems to think everyone should have a government just like ours, when it seems if they had have wanted one, they would have evolved into one eventually on their own. But, I never claimed to be a political genius in the slightest degree. So, all of the input and opinions are both interesting and helpful. I guess I just wanted to see if the rest of America sometimes wondered what I was wondering when I first asked the question. Thanks everyone! The more the merrier!

  7. profile image0
    ThisIsMyNameManposted 8 years ago

    This is a very good question, and you should not feel ashamed to be "controversial" if necessary. The willingness and ability to question the mentality of the herd, or to stand up against the unquestioning majority, is lovely and worthy of respect. I have two observations...

    Having lived in the US for many years in the past, I found it strange and even amusing that in the country that prides itself on religious tolerance (Christian tolerance, as per thesecondadvent), free speech and liberalism of all kinds there are Christian groups and denominations whose outlook on life and others is so fundamental, orthodox and rigorous so as to even put to shame other countries which have markedly higher percentages of Christian citizens. Even in places like Italy (the "home" of the Church, albeit Catholic) you do not hear of the kind of views and intolerance and damnation that you hear in the US, and...

    While it is true that the aim of US foreign policy is to promote US interests (and there's nothing wrong with that), what is of concern to many in the rest of the world are the means used to achieve or promote those interests. There IS an established history of the use of military power, surreptitious tactics, political assassinations, economic blockades and such to bring about those interests. There seems to be a mentality that the means always justify the ends, which we know isn't always true or right. Additionally, the US doesn't always condone those same means when used by other countries. There's a level of artifice and hypocrisy there that actually sparks resentment against the US in many other parts of the world. We must remember that politics is as much about PERCEPTION as it is about power, and it's those resentment-creating perceptions that the US should address if it is to really deserve that much-repeated "we keep the world safe for democracy" claim.

  8. Aidan James profile image61
    Aidan Jamesposted 8 years ago

    Great question,

    it does seem strange that a democratic society which upholds freedom of thought, speech and religion and supposedly secular does try to force its own way on others.

    Strange too that large tracts of the military of the country swear everything to God, even those individuals within who don't actually believe in that God!

    Tradition is a strange thing...

  9. dabeaner profile image55
    dabeanerposted 8 years ago

    One reason is that despite all the propaganda to the contrary, the U.S. is (unfortunately) a religious nation.  The national religion is christianity.  (Look at all the sex, reproduction, and drug laws.)

    Look at how the Mormons, Baptists, and other christian sects send out missionaries to convert the "heathen" to christianity.  They just can't mind their own business.  (Just like the Muslim wogs can't mind THEIR own business.)

    There are many more aspects.  It could be a whole Hub but, frankly, it would be a waste of my time for no Adsense money to do such a Hub.  There is no cure for stupidity and self-righteousness.

  10. syzygyastro profile image78
    syzygyastroposted 8 years ago

    Real democracy must have this foundation and it can't be coerced. There's no democracy unless there's economic democracy. If resources can't be shared equally, then any religious or political argument concerning democracy or any other ocrcacy is mere chatter.

  11. outdoorsguy profile image56
    outdoorsguyposted 8 years ago

    it all stems from the Cold war with the soviets.. basic history should have taught all of you that.   the Soviets were running around overthrowing Governments, propping up others.  setting up puppet states.   The US responded, by doing the same thing to save others from what was seen as a major threat to the US and the world thru power and land grabs.

    now its almost US canon, to bring what is seen as the greatest freedom and best form of government to the world.   which furthers US influence, power and interests.

  12. eli grey profile image61
    eli greyposted 8 years ago

    Men with power wish to dominate all they can see. It has been done throuhout history. Look at the Crusades. It wasn't all about land but about forcing others into submission. Men with power will do great and terrible things even if it they do not mean to. Religion is looked on as a myth. soon everyone who believes in it will be punished here on earth. Politics are the devil's bread and butter. Why do you think there are so many corrupt politicans?

  13. peterxdunn profile image59
    peterxdunnposted 7 years ago

    I'm sorry to have to disabuse you, Laura, but you do not live in democracy (I'm guessing that you are American). 

    Did you vote for any of the wars to 'democratise' other nations?

    Are you aware of the fact that America has, on occasion, destabalised democratically elected governments that refused to 'play ball' with American corporations?

    The current situation in Afghanistan is a case in point.  It's all about democracy right.  Wrong.  It's all about bringing oil and gas pipelines through Afghanistan: from the Caspian Sea, to the emerging markets of India and Pakistan.  The pipelines will be built and operated by a company called Unacol (look them up).  Construction will begin - if everything goes to plan - in 2014.

  14. Michelle Callis profile image60
    Michelle Callisposted 7 years ago

    Laura, I think that the answer to the question you pose is probably one with many answers depending upon the heart of the persons we have elected to a position of authority to make such decisions that would create an atmosphere of force....which the people elected to office represent the majority of the country as evidenced by votes. So it seems the motive of elected officials would represent most of the U.S. It does seem in some respects that our country does some of the things you mention in your question and some of the things that others have posted here in response to your question.

    Ideally, our country has a responsibility to become involved in the betterment of the world. To whom much has been given, much will be expected. To avoid sharing would be selfishness and greed. However sometimes, as a country, we overstep bounds in our zeal to lead and to help. It's best to first ask a person/country if they want our help --without permission there is force. The U.S. is not only a country blessed with products and services, etc. etc. etc. but one also a melting pot of creative ideas. Though our country may get caught up in various ideas of "ours" being the "only way" ourselves, it may be good for other countries to see that there are other ways of doing things and give them the chance to choose. They might enjoy a new lifestyle but if they are not at first aware of that option they can not fully choose for themselves if they really want or like their old ways or if they are doing simply because it's all they know. I think Americans like to have the freedom of choices and would like to supply others with that freedom. And when they see a country without freedoms they perceive an injustice and feel the need to fix it.

    But of course, there are probably some who have ill intents toward other countries and use the idea of freedom as a method of bargain or black mail to get what they want for free enterprise purposes. Still, I love America - it's my home!

  15. bibi16 profile image59
    bibi16posted 7 years ago

    Because we are less than 300 years old, and are barely in our adolescence historically. We have a lot of capitalism mixed with geneocide in our roots, it still is causing us to act out our tantrums publically. Might take us a while. But I still love being an American. LOL. BB16

  16. Julie Burke profile image52
    Julie Burkeposted 7 years ago

    I don't know of any countries that have been under religious laws for thousands of years. Islam only started in the 600's and Christianity in the 1st century. Judiasm would count, but they spent a couple thousand years without a country to rule. Maybe Hindu?

  17. lawrencebeach2010 profile image59
    lawrencebeach2010posted 7 years ago

    I think we should take care of ourselves first. I understand furthering rights of the people of the world. But it causes the deaths of our soldiers.

  18. Faceless39 profile image93
    Faceless39posted 7 years ago

    Because then we will start to merge toward a one world government.  Also, democracy allows the people in power to manipulate the population, and remove freedoms while everyone thinks they have input.  They don't.

  19. Express10 profile image88
    Express10posted 6 years ago

    I think the people who explode with anger at your question are frustrated that they don't have a quick and clean answer. I admit that I don't either but your question is a good one that doesn't frustrate me. I completely agree with Quilligrapher in that the US only wishes to promote it's interests. I find it strange that so many Americans cannot understand why we Americans are seen through wary eyes in many parts of the world particularly after we push our ways onto others and pressure them to do things for our benefit. They can see that most of our policies are not truly altruistic. Don't even get me started on the negative behavior that many Americans put on public display when they travel abroad.

  20. Robert Pummer profile image61
    Robert Pummerposted 6 years ago

    It may be comforting to pretend that our enemies "hate our freedoms," as President Bush stated, but it is a mistake to ignore the truth.
    President Bush is not the first to ask: "Why do they hate us?" In a staff discussion 44 years ago, President Eisenhower asked his National Security Council about "the campaign of hatred against us [in the Arab world], not by the governments but by the people".

    His National Security Council outlined the basic reasons: the US supports corrupt and oppressive governments and is "opposing political or economic progress" because of its interest in controlling the oil resources of the region.

    "Democratization is not on the American agenda in the Middle East. The reason? Because Washington finds it more efficient to support a range of dictators across the Arab world as long as they conform to U.S. foreign policy needs."- Graham E. Fuller former CIA 8/24/98

    Those policy "needs" are actually the demands of powerful corporations. It is the undermining of democracy that people in the Middle East hate. The people in the Middle East hate the fact that the United States is supporting oppressive harsh governments which block democracy and development and that the U.S. is doing it because we want control of their oil resources.

  21. nanderson500 profile image87
    nanderson500posted 5 years ago

    I can understand the resentment of a nation when another country tries to impose their political system on it. That said, I think the world be a better place if every nation was a democracy.

  22. profile image53
    abt79posted 5 years ago

    When you discover something good, you usually want to share it with others. Obviously the U.S. of A has become a little edgy with foreign policy in the last 300 years. I think it is because, not only does the U.S. view democracy as a good thing, but it also sees non-democratic nations as a threat at times, which has turned out o be true sometimes(Cold War, WWII)...but not always, i guess.

 
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